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It's a fun experience to play with a convex Baroque bow, but if you've ever tried to use it for anything romantic or later, you'll quickly want to get back to the concave Tourte design that everybody has nowadays. The thing with convex bows is that they bounce around like mad. This can work quite well for the elegant-rhythmic dance feel of Baroque and early ...


9

Even if you angle the bow quite strongly, the entire breadth of hair does touch the string as soon as you put some pressure on the bow (the outermost hairs will get stretched and give way, i.e. the bow sinks deeper and the other hairs touch the string too. Only at very low pressure, i.e. very low dynamic level, is it really only the outermost hairs that ...


8

First off, I would seriously consider having it done by a professional. Violin bow rehairing can cost about $50 with cello and bass bows costing a bit more. Given that it is quite a skilfull operation, that might be a consideration worth your while because there is always a risk of damaging your bow. I would suggest, however, that if the $50 rehairing fee ...


6

If you trace the development of the orchestra, you'll see that there has been a shift toward larger groups in larger spaces between the baroque period and now. A natural consequence of this is that instruments had to adapt to project more sound to fill those spaces up. The modern bow is just one of those adaptations. The concave design can hold significantly ...


2

As posted in this article: Here's what you'll need: Horse hair (like this $7 pack on Amazon) needle-nose pliers scissors super glue gauge (like this one) thin wire wire cutters hair clips or slides comb Here's how to do it: Remove the old hair by cutting it with your scissors. Leave a few inches at each end. Using ...


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