24

A broken chord like this is notated with double stems for each note. One set of stems corresponds to the eighth-note onsets of each pitch. The second set of stems corresponds to the duration of each pitch and shows the tie to the final, full chord. It is acceptable to use shared note heads in this kind of situation. For example, the first note could have a ...


21

Just based off of the span of these pitches, most players can't play all of these pitches with one hand (assuming either a B♭–D or B–D♯ span). As such, I would argue that pedaling is the best bet. Just write the pitches as normal eighth notes, but indicate to the player to hold down the pedal, thereby sustaining the pitches until the pedal sign changes: It'...


16

When it comes to fingering questions, the broader the question the more the answer will be: "it depends." That is probably why you find conflicting information online, too many answers that don't provide the specific context for one fingering approach versus another. You can say that generally your fingers get placed about mid-way along the length ...


12

Grace notes are the proper way to do this. Including ties from each grace note to its corresponding main note indicates that each grace note should be held. The core of the answer can be found in What's the proper piano notation for adding one note at a time to a chord and holding all the notes?, but since this specific scenario isn't addressed there, the ...


11

Usually this is notated with the comment "let ring" above or below the staff; optionally you can include a dashed line (similar to an 8va line) that indicates the span of music where it should be played this way. Here's a good example


10

Actually you might be on to something. I know from teaching beginning guitarist (and from my own personal experience) that learning to contort your fingers and hands into the correct position to instantly finger a given chord is very difficult. Nothing in the natural everyday world provides any advance training for those type hand formations and movements -...


10

Fingering is entirely crucial, yes, and the benefits flower over a long period of time. It is often difficult for a beginner piano player to understand why on an intuitive level, but here are a few reasons: Good fingerings make sure that there are always fingers available for the notes that you need next. This makes you more dexterous in the long run. ...


10

A minor scale with the raised sixth degree is called the Dorian scale. It is actually a mode of the diatonic scale, which is the same as starting the major scale from the second degree, or starting minor from the fourth degree. As a sidenote, G F B♭ could be considered a G minor 7th chord without the fifth. The fifth can often be omitted since it's not ...


10

Stagger the notes, so play them as an arpeggio, one after the other, top to bottom (as the arrow shows direction).


9

Okay so if I understand you correctly you are not having any trouble with chord changes when using a pick (presumably to strum) but if you are playing fingerstyle one string at a time with a pattern or using a pick to pick out individual notes of a chord (in a pattern) - then your transitions between chords simply fall apart. If that is what is happening ...


9

There are a lot of good answers here but I didn't see what I was primarily looking for in them, so I will add it. In addition to patience and practice, there is a technique for making the chord change more smoothly. When stumming, we usually have to nail the chord change completely in the very small amount of time between the last strum of the old chord ...


9

Answer is - it depends!. Since our fingers aren't all the same length, each will press down its individual note at a different point anyway. Thumb, being a couple of inches less reach than the middle finger, will usually press near the end of the key nearest to the player, while middle will generally press close to the black keys' ends. But - there are going ...


9

To understand the brackets, see What does the L-shaped symbol attached to C5 and G4 on the top staff mean?. In terms of execution of both cases, you'll play the bottom octave with your left hand, then jump to play the left-hand bracketed part (upside-down L) and right-hand bracketed part (right-side-up L) as a single arpeggio.


8

It's not so much making your thumb go underneath the fingers/palm as moving your whole hand. As soon as you've played the first C, the whole hand should have started to move right. By the time your middle finger hits the G, your thumb should be under that part of your palm. Whole hand then continues gently right, putting the thumb onto the next C. The thump ...


8

One on one. Tonic on first beat of a bar. Other main notes from tonic triad also on the main beats of each bar. Key C major. For the second example, the anacrucis is inconsequential (sorry!), again, main notes on main beats. On the dominant. Key E minor. It's very possible to use exactly the same notes to produce different key feelings. Modes do it all the ...


8

Arpeggios are an incredibly common figure in violin music. Most of the limitations you seem worried about simply don't exist. Arpeggios are just notes to us; there are no special rules about which strings or fingerings are expected. If you want to be extra nice to the players and make everything easy (or if you have very fast arpeggios that need to be easy): ...


7

There are two types of formulas you can use to find the relation between notes— just intonation, and equal temperament; both of which have their benefits and trade-offs, which I will not go into in much detail in this answer, as it seems outside of the scope of your question. First, a general rule, that holds true in both systems To find a note an octave ...


7

The arm places the thumb. Using just your arm and gravity - not your thumb's abductor, play your thumb down on C, then from the arm, lift up the arm and hand and leading with your elbow play the octave higher C. Regarding your wrist pain, a lot of times when a pianist crosses the thumb under the palm, they anticipate the next finger position and twist the ...


7

I have played this particular section in the Mendelssohn before, so I have some knowledge about it. Mostly, the fingering depends on the speed at which you are going to perform the arpeggio and the bow stroke. For example, most violinists (including me) would play this section of the Mendelssohn with a ricochet or a brush stroke. For those types of bow ...


6

This sounds to me like you do not have the picking technique down yet. This makes you focus on the right hand which leads to you struggling with the left-hand chord changes. My advice for you would be to maybe first forget about chords and just play open strings. Make sure you have got the finger picking down to the extent where you can look at your left ...


6

You need to reduce your cognitive load. The other answers have some good ideas, but here is another quick one: Simplify the picking pattern you are practicing with. So instead of practicing an arpeggiated pattern, just pluck the bass with your thumb, then three treble strings at once with three fingers held together. That's it. PLUCK-twang, PLUCK-twang, ...


6

I’m assuming that everywhere you said A and E you actually mean Ab and Eb, right? The answer definitely isn’t c), glissando should only be used for sweeps across all strings, but there’s no pedal position that can produce exclusively 2 pitches. In fact, out of all 2,187 possible pedal combinations, the fewest distinct pitch classes possible is 4, and only 42 ...


6

I assume you are using this fingering... Obviously, you are having trouble with the transition from finger 3 to 1, the G4 to C5 move. First thought: if playing the C major chord is considered easy, because so much beginner stuff is in C major, reconsider that all white key passages can be harder than a mix of black and white keys. Try playing this ...


6

The long one in the first example sounds starting from the bottom note in the left hand and runs through to the top note in the right hand. In your second example, you start and finish both arpeggiated chords at the same time.


5

Finger Style I would suggest you practice right-hand patterns. Your note that the exercises you found are "useless" suggests to me that the area you truly want to improve is your right-hand finger picking technique. There are 3 fundamental patterns you should master with the right hand to begin with: 1) Ascending arpeggio: Thumb, Index, Middle, Ring. ...


5

Good choice of song! I Asked about the very same passage to my piano teacher, and it's actually not as difficult as you might imagine. Ok, here goes. Notice that the beginning arpeggios are all just a D major, and you have the exact same shape on the keys for each chord. I don't know what fingering you are using, but if you take 3 notes per hand(...


5

I suppose that happens in the left hand in the songs you're referring to, while the right hand plays something different? Then it's a kind of alternate bass.


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