10

Usually this is notated with the comment "let ring" above or below the staff; optionally you can include a dashed line (similar to an 8va line) that indicates the span of music where it should be played this way. Here's a good example


10

Actually you might be on to something. I know from teaching beginning guitarist (and from my own personal experience) that learning to contort your fingers and hands into the correct position to instantly finger a given chord is very difficult. Nothing in the natural everyday world provides any advance training for those type hand formations and movements -...


10

The order of the notes in a chord rarely affect its name. B D# F# make B major. Adding A (b7) makes it dominant 7th. The E is the 4th, which could be a sus 4 but since there is the maj 3 (D#) that can't be sus. E becomes the 11th. but since there is no 9th (C#) it must be B7 add 11.


9

Okay so if I understand you correctly you are not having any trouble with chord changes when using a pick (presumably to strum) but if you are playing fingerstyle one string at a time with a pattern or using a pick to pick out individual notes of a chord (in a pattern) - then your transitions between chords simply fall apart. If that is what is happening ...


8

There are a lot of good answers here but I didn't see what I was primarily looking for in them, so I will add it. In addition to patience and practice, there is a technique for making the chord change more smoothly. When stumming, we usually have to nail the chord change completely in the very small amount of time between the last strum of the old chord ...


8

Fingering is entirely crucial, yes, and the benefits flower over a long period of time. It is often difficult for a beginner piano player to understand why on an intuitive level, but here are a few reasons: Good fingerings make sure that there are always fingers available for the notes that you need next. This makes you more dexterous in the long run. ...


8

It's not so much making your thumb go underneath the fingers/palm as moving your whole hand. As soon as you've played the first C, the whole hand should have started to move right. By the time your middle finger hits the G, your thumb should be under that part of your palm. Whole hand then continues gently right, putting the thumb onto the next C. The thump ...


7

This sounds to me like you do not have the picking technique down yet. This makes you focus on the right hand which leads to you struggling with the left-hand chord changes. My advice for you would be to maybe first forget about chords and just play open strings. Make sure you have got the finger picking down to the extent where you can look at your left ...


7

The arm places the thumb. Using just your arm and gravity - not your thumb's abductor, play your thumb down on C, then from the arm, lift up the arm and hand and leading with your elbow play the octave higher C. Regarding your wrist pain, a lot of times when a pianist crosses the thumb under the palm, they anticipate the next finger position and twist the ...


6

I assume you are using this fingering... Obviously, you are having trouble with the transition from finger 3 to 1, the G4 to C5 move. First thought: if playing the C major chord is considered easy, because so much beginner stuff is in C major, reconsider that all white key passages can be harder than a mix of black and white keys. Try playing this ...


5

I suppose that happens in the left hand in the songs you're referring to, while the right hand plays something different? Then it's a kind of alternate bass.


5

Finger Style I would suggest you practice right-hand patterns. Your note that the exercises you found are "useless" suggests to me that the area you truly want to improve is your right-hand finger picking technique. There are 3 fundamental patterns you should master with the right hand to begin with: 1) Ascending arpeggio: Thumb, Index, Middle, Ring. ...


5

Good choice of song! I Asked about the very same passage to my piano teacher, and it's actually not as difficult as you might imagine. Ok, here goes. Notice that the beginning arpeggios are all just a D major, and you have the exact same shape on the keys for each chord. I don't know what fingering you are using, but if you take 3 notes per hand(...


5

You need to reduce your cognitive load. The other answers have some good ideas, but here is another quick one: Simplify the picking pattern you are practicing with. So instead of practicing an arpeggiated pattern, just pluck the bass with your thumb, then three treble strings at once with three fingers held together. That's it. PLUCK-twang, PLUCK-twang, ...


5

Keys are descriptive, not prescriptive. This means that they help the person reading/interpreting the music to understand it. Also, the key does not absolutely force hard rules on the composer — it provides a toolset to work with, and some mental shortcuts; guidelines, basically. In the key of C, something like a D Major 7th would be fairly rare ...


5

There are two types of formulas you can use to find the relation between notes— just intonation, and equal temperament; both of which have their benefits and trade-offs, which I will not go into in much detail in this answer, as it seems outside of the scope of your question. First, a general rule, that holds true in both systems To find a note an octave ...


5

I think the important distinction here is that between "the diminished-seventh chord on C'' and "the diminished-seventh chord in the key of C." You're correct: the diminished-seventh chord on C has B♭♭. But the diminished-seventh chord in the key of C is going to be b°7: B D F A♭. This is because, when one considers the diatonic seventh chord, the only ...


5

I’m assuming that everywhere you said A and E you actually mean Ab and Eb, right? The answer definitely isn’t c), glissando should only be used for sweeps across all strings, but there’s no pedal position that can produce exclusively 2 pitches. In fact, out of all 2,187 possible pedal combinations, the fewest distinct pitch classes possible is 4, and only 42 ...


4

I don't see any way to finger that chord other than using the index for the bass note, and I don't see any way to play the arpeggio other than using the index finger on G string fret 7, so I don't see how you could keep the bass note ringing. If you MUSt keep the bass note and don't mind changing the octave of one of the other notes, then you could play the ...


4

More often you go over the top, because there's a lot less room under your hand than over it. Sometimes if the moving hand is on white keys and the other hand is on black, it makes sense to go under. Hold your hands to minimize movement. Position your fingers over the notes before playing them. (If I may say so, that's probably where you're having ...


4

Fingerpicking style on a guitar is essentially arpeggio all over. Typical fretted string instruments (including a number of viols) are essentially arpeggio instruments. With regard to instruments not specifically built to facilitate arpeggio, most keyboard instruments would qualify. It's probably a tossup between piano and chromatic button accordion: the ...


4

Simple answer: Two weeks is not enough to be effective at fingerpicking for the first time. Have patience. Practice consistently, every day. Take breaks during your practice to let your fingers forget (within the same practice session), and then relearn the pattern for a more concentrated effort. Your memory is key. Memorize, and practice for memory's sake. ...


4

I'll borrow the arpeggio definition from wikipedia: An arpeggio (Italian: [arˈpeddʒo]) is a musical technique where notes in a chord are played or sung in sequence, one after the other, rather than ringing out simultaneously. So, let's say you have the C major chord, which consists of the notes C-E-G. If you play these 3 notes together, they will form ...


4

I'm not entirely familiar with that term but I believe I can provide some insight. There appear to be two things happening in your example. The first is the idea of arpeggio superimposing and the second being an alteration to the G7 chord. If I'm properly understanding what I briefly looked up just now, arpeggio superimposing is basically playing an ...


4

Fingering is crucial when learning piano - and lots of other instruments. However, it's more productive to know why certain fingerings are important. Sometimes they are just the product of a helpful printer, sometimes they are the only fingerings that work in that situation. Working out what is the best fingering for you is the most important, as you're the ...


4

More usual would be to practice arpeggios in C major just using the notes C, E, G. Using a pattern something like this: C E G C' E' G' C'' G' E' C' G E C (using C' for the octave above C etc.) Using fingerings: 1 2 3 1 2 3 5 3 2 1 3 2 1 Also practice the same thing with the left hand, and then with both hands together. The do the same thing in other ...


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