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I have not yet played the Liszt-etude, but have succeeded with the Chopin-etude in the past. Below are my personal tips. Good technique Before you think about stamina, make sure that your technique is efficient. With a non-ideal technique, the etude becomes significantly harder to play. I've both seen people struggle with it, who seemed really tense, and ...


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Not enough rep to comment, but to me (probably because I'm not a guitarist) F D A and E♭ C G are inversions of Dm and Cm respectively, making your chord progression I7 - V - IV in the key of G (natural) minor.


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To me the chords look like: Gm7 - F6 - E♭6 and it could continue for example like this: B♭/D - Cm7 - B♭maj7 - Am7 - D7 Translated into three-note combinations like in your question: G - F - B♭ (Gm7) F - D - A (F6) E♭ - C - G (E♭6) D - B♭ - F (B♭/D) C - B♭ - E♭ (Cm7) B♭ - A - D (B♭maj7) A - G - C (...


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...so it's almost C minor but with sixth degree raised half step @awelotta's answer already points out the collection of tones is the Dorian mode. But I think the more important thing that makes this almost minor - as in the key of C minor - is not the sixth degree but the seventh degree. The general minor family is first defined by a mediant (3rd degree) ...


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A minor scale with the raised sixth degree is called the Dorian scale. It is actually a mode of the diatonic scale, which is the same as starting the major scale from the second degree, or starting minor from the fourth degree. As a sidenote, G F B♭ could be considered a G minor 7th chord without the fifth. The fifth can often be omitted since it's not ...


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Some things to consider are: play lots of chord tones or large interval leaps definitely look at combining downbeat rhythms with syncopation, a lot of downbeat rhythm can give it drive, but a few syncopations add contrast and energy hold the "chord" while the bass or second guitar changes to another chord, exploit the resulting dissonance (sort of like a ...


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Quartal harmony may be something interesting to explore. I stumbled into it while studying Alan Holdworth, who uses quartal harmony to build arpeggios. I was always (and am still) fascinated by Holdsworth's note selections, arpeggios and scale runs. "Use of the terms quartal and quintal arises from a contrast, compositional or perceptual, with traditional ...


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B♭ chord is the first, third and 5th notes of the B♭major scale. That's B♭, D and F. B♭6 adds the 6th note of the scale. So that's B♭, D, F, and G. Not sure quite how that fits in with the notation you showed us. But that's what B♭6 means. I guess you know what an arpeggio is?


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B♭6 means B♭-D-F-G (the formula for a major 6th chord is R, W+W, W+H, W, where R is root, W - whole tone and H - semitone). As for arpeggios and how they are notated - I do not know for sure. I play 2 monophonic instruments and rarely deal with this sort of symbols. I think notation depends on time period and what instrument it was written for (I vaguely ...


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I can only provide advice based on my experience as a guitarist, not a pianist. But I do play pieces that are several pages long and require stamina in both hands. This first thing I'd say is to check if these pieces introduce new techniques or patterns that you are unfamiliar with. That can put a strain on you. If so, I'd isolate those and drill them ...


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This is why you were suppose to practice scales and arpeggios! If you want to build up stamina for these pieces, don't "wear out" the pieces themselves. When you can play scales and arpeggios continuously at the same tempo and dynamics for the same duration as the pieces, you will have the stamina you need. Don't just stick to "standard" scales in octaves -...


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