24

Availability. Guitars are far more available than lutes. You can go down to any music store and buy a guitar for a very reasonable price. Even non-musicians will sometimes keep a guitar on hand. Just from personal experience, but I know someone who only occasionally plays the guitar, but he has 3 on hand. Why? He found them for a couple hundred dollars....


23

I'd recommend just finding a number of fade-out songs and looking for live videos on YouTube (etc.) to see how they're handled. There are a number of ways, but here are some common ones: If the recorded version ends in a vamp, it'll be based off of a repeated harmonic progression. Just end the progression in a cadence at some point. Often there's a brief ...


23

No, not if by inferred you mean unambiguously deduced. For example, organists have developed the reharmonization of hymn tunes into a fine art. Yes, if by inferred you mean finding chords that more or less fit. That's because harmonization is possible at all. Some sequences of chords will fit better (by various criteria) than others, of course. ...


20

Great question! I just happen to have the Prelude on my desk at the moment - you've got a really interesting project on your hands there, but quite a lot of work - good luck! Hopefully I can add to jjmusicnotes really useful advice with some ideas that will make this a far simpler project for you. Firstly, from your question, it seems like you are "half-...


19

The octave your violinist suggested is fine. Another possibility is the following: Why did Beethoven not write the above chord in his piano sonata? Because that major tenth is rather awkwardly wide for a pianist's hand. The chord he did write spans only an octave and so fits the pianist's hand. People writing for the piano prefer what is easier (and prefer ...


18

There are acoustical reasons for not wanting close voicing in the lower register; in short, the upper harmonics muddy each other up and fog up the sound. But in my experience, C4 is a really high limit; I can think of tons of scores with thirds below C4. Every musical environment is different, and sometimes you might want that slightly muddy sound. But if ...


17

Another option is to actually overplay the fade out! The singer slowly stepping away from the microphone, the drummer dramatically only slightly touching the drums, etc. This kind of "comic overdoing" works if the original piece has a really cliché fadeout, and the audience is both familiar with the fadeout cliché, and recognizes that you are lampooning ...


16

An arrangement is about which instruments play what, when and how for a specific tune. The core of a tune, or composition, is the melody/-ies1. Using this core an arranger - i.e. the person attributed by "arranged by" - when creating an arrangement may Decide what instruments, including singing voices, to use Select key (or keys) for the arrangement (i.e. ...


15

MattPutnam's answer covered technical aspects very nicely. Here I have some further thoughts that are often overlooked. String quartets require you to be careful about more than notes. Even though the three (there are two violins in the quartet) instruments belong to the same family, they have each their own perks: they respond differently to dynamics; ...


15

The words denote totally different concepts and the difference lies in the arrangemental intent for the instruments playing tones in parallel octaves: Parallel, or consecutive, octaves If the intent of an arrangement is to have independent voices but two (or more of) them happen to move in parallel at the octave (or in unison, or two or more octaves apart) ...


15

If a live all-acoustic band is trying to perform such pieces, it's not really feasible to do a fade. It's a little-known fact but most acoustic instruments and even vocals are capable of producing a large variety of volumes. In addition, an "acoustic fadeout" does not necessarily require all instruments to fade out exactly the same. It's actually rather ...


13

An arranger specifically changes the music away from what was originally written. This is different from an editor who might clean up notation, clarify the meaning of markings, translate outdated terms, give instructions for proper interpretation, etc. Both technically alter the original but the editor tries to "bring out" the original as much as possible, ...


12

When you have a cover song, what defines it is the melody. Two songs may have similar chord progressions, textures, and accompaniment, but the melody is truly what separates them. As long as you don't mess with the melody, you can do almost anything. Dr Mayhem listed a few, and I'll list a few more: Re-harmonize the accompaniment. Change the "feel" (...


12

What Gustav Holst did in... Neptune, I'm 99% sure ... was he had the female choir in another room, and someone slowly closed the door on them. Of course, that can't quite happen in most concert situations, but it's an idea.


12

Don't be so literal minded. This is easy to play, and effective: If the quartet know the original piano version, they can easily simulate the arpeggio simply by violin 2 playing a bit ahead of the beat. Trying to get Violin 1 to play all four notes as written will probably be sound clumsy at this tempo, and it won't be as "ff" as something easier to play ...


10

Dr Mayhem gives you loads of great ideas here. I can't really add much. But, as a counterpoint to his answer, I would say you need to think about what you don't change when doing a cover of a song. This might seem really obvious, but often you can work out what is most important about a song by trying to strip it back to absolute basics. A great song will ...


9

Unfortunately, the answer to your question is one that you can only ultimately provide. Orchestration is an art form unto itself, and your choices are personal and unique to your sense of nuance and knowledge of the music. For example, a particular melody or line given to a cornet will sound differently if given to the flugelhorn instead; though the same ...


9

Adding to the narrative in other answers, here is a chart that might help further explain why brass players tend to prefer sheet music written in keys with flats. As is shown, written keys that exclude the “worst-to-play usual notes” (elaborated below) on common brass instruments (except French horn) are overwhelmingly keys with flats. This is ...


9

Closed vocings aren't bad, but you need to be aware of the register you are in no matter what you compose. In lower registers, having notes close together isn't always what you want. Specifically intervals that are supposed to have color like 3rds and 6ths both will sound "muddied" to most. Perfect internals typically don't observe this problem. This is also ...


9

Disclaimer: I'm not a violinist. What follows is all head-knowledge, not practical experience. As you know, since a violin bridge is curved, no more than two strings can sound at a time, so any chord will of course need to be arpeggiated. This isn't that big a deal, and is part of the characteristic sound of violin stops. However, you also need to consider ...


8

A simple shortlist of obvious ways to make it at least different (which may mean more interesting) is: change the time signature (have you ever tried playing a rock song as a waltz?) change the tempo (speeding up or slowing down can dramatically change a song) change the instruments (use guitars, ukeleles, bagpipes etc) change the vocal style (male voice ...


8

First off, every progression is valid. Whether it sounds good, makes sense harmonically, or is what you want is entirely different. So every progression you list is valid, however some things should be noted. When substituting closely related chords the function will be similar to that of what you are substituting, but not serve the exact function. For ...


8

You certainly don't want to just leave out one of the parts; it will almost certainly have at least some vital musical information that will hurt the final product. Typically with arranging for three voices, you want to make sure you have a bass line, the melody, and enough harmonic support in the inner voices to fill out the texture. This means that every ...


8

The lute has a very pleasant part of the audio spectrum in the classical repertoire. It is much easier to get a lute working with a string ensemble than it is a guitar. It just seems to fit the spectrum better. Unfortunately, that is often overshadowed by the sheer impractical nature of the lute. It has a number of strings more than a guitar. You have ...


8

There will be differences in the tone quality, because the baritone/euphonium is a conical bore instrument whereas the trombone is a cylindrical bore. (Generally speaking, this means that the trombone will have a brighter tone than the baritone/euphonium.) But in terms of range, the two instruments are pretty similar, and the baritone can certainly play the ...


7

Having faced this issue some times, the best reccomendation i can give you is first of all, listen to your recordings in various systems, the more, the best, because if you want the world to listen to it, you can never test every system in the world, so, try as many as you can and try to balance for the best in all the systems. Particularly, one of the best ...


7

You have a couple good questions here. Parallel Fifths and Parallel Octaves occur primarily in realizing functional harmony; whether it is in a chorale, a fugue, or any number of traditional forms of the European Classical tradition. They are the result of two voices moving in parallel motion - hence the term "parallel fifth / octave." They are forbidden ...


7

It will absolutely be noticeable, because the arranger wanted to have a clear, deep bass line. Moving the line up one octave removes that effect. Now, if you did play your variant, nobody would stand up in the back of the room and shout "YOU'RE PLAYING IT WRONG". But having the deep bass line is fairly important in this music. You should, if at all ...


7

As Richard said, such fade-outs usually go over a repeated vamp. Rock bands tend to cycle that vamp as long as they think the audience can bear it, then the drummer plays a fill to cue the others into the final chord, which is then simply held for a couple of seconds (often with tremolo guitar flailing and more drum-roll filling), culminating in a fat ...


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