21

Through @Michael Seifert excellent super-sleuthing on identification of the music edition (in comments on original question), the mark is spiccato. The editor Joachim Stutschewsky explains this in another piece he edited: Divertimento on Swedish Themes, Op.42 (Romberg, Bernhard) On 2nd page has the following:


11

One of the things my first piano teacher taught me when looking at Bach was to isolate the voices and play the parts by themselves to get to know how the individual lines sounded like, not just their congregation. Because we are limited to only two hands of five fingers only, we have to make some sacrifices sometimes, as you correctly noted. In your example, ...


8

The short, general answer All things (all voices) being equal, solution #1 is the correct technical approach. The shorter note should interrupt the longer one, but then continue to be held (allowing for additional interruptions) for the duration of the longest note.1,2 Solution #2 is appropriate in some situations (see below). Solution #3 is never ...


7

Legato as an articulation is needed, because it is not the default "goes without saying" articulation, at least not universally for all instruments and styles. And legato slurs are needed to show which notes should be played as a single phrase, which couldn't be done by writing a single word "legato" somewhere. If you listen to players ...


3

Probably more to do with phrasing. From beginning to end of a legato phrase, all the notes will be joined 'in one breath', but at some point, that phrase will end, and a new one start. Those end and start notes won't be legato. There are several stages between staccato and legato, so it's rarely one or the other.


3

You basically play the eighth note the same length as a sixteenth note because it is staccato. Chopin did this to make the section seem light. And light you should play it so you can play it fast.


2

Several people have suggested thumb position, but it does not seem likely given it doesn't reach high enough, in my opinion. Possibly it could mean left hand pizzicato, where the string is tapped energetically in the position of the note indicated, creating a very soft sound of that pitch. I have seen that marked with Xs in place of the note head. I have ...


2

Ad 1) Yes, it certainly is a very good practice. Larger scores would be a pain to manage without this. (It's also good for cases when you need a dynamic that does not attach to any particular notes in the music, e. g. you can write c1 in your music and s2\< s\> in your dynamics to make a crescendo-decrescendo pair on the single note.) Ad 2) You have ...


2

Ta-ta-ka is the standard, but the primary concern is that each tone receive its proper emphasis. So if this can be achieved with ta-ka-ta or even ka-ta-ta, then ultimately the technique is of less importance. I practice all three just because it's good practice. In performance I've always fallen back on ta-ta-ka. In the specific case mentioned, I use ta-ka-...


2

As @Howlium says, the legato applies only to the "melody line" in the top voice of the left hand, not to the staccato chords. As for execution... Execution EDIT: It's significant that the chords in measure 32, from the beginning of beat 2 until the "grace-chord" on 4, all lack staccato markings. Alexander Kobrin In addition to the legato ...


2

As I understand it, this is the common approach when writing multiple voices in a single staff, for example with choral music you will have four voices (Soprano, Alto, Tenor, Bass), and each voice follows its own independent rhythmic markings. In this case, there is a melodic voice (played with fingers 2-5 of the right hand) and the accompanying chords, ...


1

On many instruments, connected notes do not have to be attacked. On those instruments, a slur means to only attack the first note in the group. For example, on the flute, one would only tongue the first note in a slur. With instruments like piano, there are several possibilities: Phrasing. Legato not only means connected notes, but also notes diminishing in ...


1

There's nothing wrong with writing an accent on a tremolo. Musicians will interpret it exactly as you would expect


1

Certainly not 3. We mustn't hear a note struck that isn't in the music. 1. seems about right. At a faster tempo it might tend towards 2.


1

The legato mark applies to the phrase in the upper voices in the bass clef, not to the bass notes that have the staccato marks.


1

Almost every book about piano playing treats expression and articulation. Why looking for one that focusses on this? Just google for piano playing and technique, you’ll find a lot of practices, advices and youtube tutorials. E.g. this one: The mechanics of piano technic; a primer of the movements and forces used in piano playing, with precise analysis in ...


1

The high A staccato eighth note (R.h.) must be played with the pinky finger and the following second sixteenth note with finger 4. This means the staccato 8th notes have to be played as 16th notes. Hands and fingerings as notated.


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