12

You can easily change the key of a song by transposing it. Going from major to minor is a bit more difficult, although there are pieces of software that can do it. You would need to lower every instance of the 3rd Scale degree, to turn it into a minor 3rd. To get the full transformation, you would need to lower every 6th and 7th scale degree too, if you are ...


8

It was recorded too loud and is clipping heavily. The top's been chopped off the waveform (see picture). The information above that 'brick wall' is lost. If there's just an occasional clipped peak, restoration software can sometimes make an intelligent guess at the lost information. But there isn't really a fix for this degree of distortion, particularly ...


6

Funny, I have been doing some recording this week - first time for several months - and found the takes to be sloppy, particularly on bass, which never came over during the gigs each week. It may have been due to the new set of headphones, but that's no excuse! So, I had to clean up my playing - taking care changing frets, etc, to eliminate as much of that ...


6

I figured it out! đź‘Ź In the left inspector channel strip (this is where you will find your plugins), select "Gain" ("Stereo", not "Dual Mono"). When you receive the Gain pop-up menu, turn on "Mono", and the audio should now play out of both sides.


5

So, this is actually a mono file that has erroneously been rendered as single-channel stereo. So one fix is to convert it back to mono, which can then be used like any other mono file (panned to either side). Any DAW worth its money, or even its freeness, will have an easy way to do that. (Logic is IMO not worth its money, but still pretty sure it can do ...


5

If your guitar has a piezo transducer, then it's likely to be accentuating string & fret noise because of the way it works. Miking it up would probably sound a whole lot sweeter.


5

Some songs lend themselves easily to this. 'Silent Night' is an example (little late, but hey ho). Those three main chords -I IV and V are simple to move onto i iv and the choice then between v or V - the latter sounding more convincing. With, obviously, any m3 notes sung as M3, etc. Changing songs that use, in the major, ii, iii and vi (I'm omitting vio) ...


4

Strings with flat winding do exist. They have disadvantages, but they eliminate the sliding sound to a great extent. Disadvantages may be narrow vibrato, higher price and shorter usable life. You may or may not like their sound as well. Try different positions and orientations of the piezo transducer. There should exist an orientation where it is almost ...


4

I read online that AI really improve the sound quality Studio listening equipment shouldn't improve sound quality. Its purpose is to reproduce the sound as neutrally, as possible. If you hear a difference when using your laptop sound output, most likely the laptop colors the sound in some way. It is indeed a concern that the consumer equipment often colors ...


4

I suspect that may aspects of sound that might subjectively be thought of as warm will (as so much in life) lie not in the extremes, but somewhere in the middle of the spectrum of various possible sonic characteristics. For example.... People often associate having strong low-end frequencies with warmth, but some very strong bass might seem unnatural or ...


3

The most important thing is to start producing if you aren't already. I'm guessing you are. But if you aren't or you are getting hung up on things that you don't know instead of finishing something, just finish it. Do the best you can on what you're working on now and then ask "how could this be better" and use that as a guide for what to learn ...


3

While a piece of music in a major key can be changed to a minor key merely by lowering the third, sixth, and sometimes seventh scale degrees, there will often be places in the melody where this doesn't have the desired effect. For example, if a piece is in C major and part of the melody only uses C, D, F, and G, that part of the melody will be completely ...


3

There are thousands of options. Here are some: Books Mixing Secrets for the Small Studio by Mike Senior Recording Secrets for the Small Studio by Mike Senior Behind the Glass by Howard Massey Fundamentals of Musical Acoustics by Arthur Benade Handbook for Sound Engineers by Glen Ballou Here, There and Everywhere: My Life Recording the Music of the Beatles ...


3

If you recorded it as audio rather than Midi, then the only tool I'm aware of that can change the pitch of any single note is Melodyne (& editing one note in a chord is only possible in the highest editions*, the basic can't do that) so you're looking at minimum €399 for that functionality. Alternatively, play the incorrect part again & edit it into ...


3

The most obvious thing is consistent levels. You don't want jumps in volume, and you don't want plosives. Start with the recording. You need a good pop filter, and you want someone with the right kind of voice who knows how not to pop their plosives too much. Then a large-diaphragm microphone is your friend, ideally a dynamic mic like an SM7 (the classic ...


2

Yes editing takes in some manner has been and still is big part of the production of record music in nearly all musically genres. In the liner notes J.S. Bach Two- And Three- Part Inventions, It is written that Glen Gould confessed to the Columbia manager Ronald Wilford in 1973 "A good session will consist of 2.5 to 3 minutes of music per recording hour ..."....


2

I am afraid I don't have reliable sources discussing modern professionals' editing practices. I can only share what I know from interacting with 2-3 professional pianists who have recorded a number of CDs. From what I gathered, yes, each track is typically the result of mixing a number of takes. Some musicians go to an extreme in literally splicing every ...


2

TL;DR: sends are treated in parallel, so there is no concept of order as opposed to FX chains (inserts) which treat the audio signal in series. Unfortunately I don't have a schema ready to show you, but I'll explain with words as best as possible, hoping I understood your question properly. I could describe a very generic model of audio processing, made of ...


2

There's a versatile plugin called Scaler from Plugin Boutigue. It's available as an AU. Also there is InstaScale by WA Production. This is more a scale learning and composition support plugin, available as AU as well. Another composition support plugin helping with scales is MelodicFlow by feelyoursound. This is available as VST only.


2

If you are going to be a sound engineer then MAYBE, harmony and arrangement skills are not necessary, but that is a big IF. If you want to produce actual music with a holistic approach then you need all of it. You don't need to be a savant in an instrument, but decent piano and guitar chops are very useful. If you can get your head around basic vocal ...


2

Phase cancellation is really only an issue when there are several instances of the SAME instrument, playing the same notes. And, of course, the ultimate manifestation of this is multiple instances of the same sampled instrument. It's why we don't build up an orchestral violin section with 8 tracks playing the same notes, and why a good sample set has ...


2

I already commented on the OP but will expand a bit here. If you have a guitar with a built-in piezo pickup, a good way to record is to double it with an external mic recording. They won't give the same sound at all and, what is interesting with the external mic is that, depending on its angular response and where you put it, you can achieve very different ...


2

I'll add a tip, with the disclaimer that I'm a performer not a recording engineer: Pay attention to envelopes. In particular, if the goal is to avoid anything too jarring—crash, bang, click, pop—then you want to avoid "plosives," and probably want to soften the attacks of impulses. At the same time, my (limited) understanding of ASMR is that it's ...


2

One thing that tends to make almost anything sound "soft" is compression, possibly with just a touch of reverb. So, try applying a compression to the different instruments in the mix, testing different levels and settings, and you will probably get something useful. Of course, there's a lot more to it, and various other answers contain important ...


1

Amplification amplifies everything! But yes, a microphone will 'hear' differently to a pickup. And different microphones, placed differently, will all sound different. Experiment. But a wired pickup is so convenient! Try to clean up your playing technique too! You mention a 'sound table'. A mixer? Does it have a specific guitar input? Using Line In ...


1

A contemporary music school or conservatory offers courses in music and computer. If this doesn’t exist it might be up to the students to ask for workshops or organize them. What we did as teachers: we organized courses together with music centers, producers like steinberg, klemm and others, regional and national workshops. But this was 30 years ago before ...


1

The lines represent some level. You haven't told us WHICH audio editor you're using, and you haven't shown us the whole screen, so we can only guess WHAT levels. Here's a more useful screenshot from Wavelab where the labelling shows that the lines are at -6dB. That's a typical level for this sort of line. The 0dB line, the clipping point, is at the top ...


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