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3

Solo is when you are the only one playing the part. For soli, it is when your entire section is playing. It is literally the plural of solo, which means that more than one person is playing the solo, or a soloist is being accompanied by a section of the ensemble.


5

'Solo' is a featured passage for one player. 'Soli' is a featured passage for more than one player or instrument. It may mean the whole trombone section play it. Like 'Heads up, guys! You've got the tune!' Or that just one player on each part is to play. I think we can assume that if it's in the third part, at least SOMEONE from that section will ...


5

'Soli' generally refers to an exposed, soloistic part but played by several players or a whole section. Without seeing the score it's impossible to generalize, but it's possible that it's intended that only one player from each part plays. Your band director will explain what they want, but you should probably have the part prepared in case you have to play ...


0

If you are in one tempo which then changes to another slower tempo, which stays in time, then that's what you rehearse. If it needs doing with a metronome, so be it. Set that metronome to the last verse slower tempo, and start it on beat one of the slower part. Repetition is the only way. Keep doing it until that new tempo is assigned to the last part in ...


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To my experience, the drummer/percussionist is responsible for deciding the tempo of a song, and he/she is also responsible for tempo changes. Other band members follow the drummer's/percussionist's tempo and their responsibility is not to differ from the drummer's tempo. Yes, I think it is his job to dictate the tempo change but it is not a simple task. ...


1

Do one or more of the following Right before the tempo change, have everyone play a long note on e.g. the first beat of the last bar and let it ring. (perhaps except for the designated tempo announcer player/instrument) Designate one of the players like drummer, percussionist or guitarist, to announce the new tempo as a "... three, four" count-in into the ...


2

That’s a big question and I’m sure I won’t cover every possibility, but here goes with my thoughts ... The tempo change is owned equally by everyone, not just the percussionist, and it is everyone’s responsibility to make it work. It’s partly down to our old friend practice, in that if you rehearse it enough and listen to each other it will become more ...


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