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If you just mean the power structure of the band then it depends. I was in a band where myself and another musician had more knowledge of booking shows, recording, promoting, writing, etc. - so we both shared duties. In another band I was playing strictly guitar and backups - I didn't make decisions that didn't involve my parts or my playing. As far as ...


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Both @Albrecht Hügli and @James Whiteley have good points in their answers. I would say that it is very similar to classic chamber music like a string quartet. The similarity is that it is a small group where you can all be creative and discuss things. I have played a lot of chamber music of various kinds and we never "announced" a leader. Well you do agree ...


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I would discuss and define the rules before I enter in a band. The rules can be defined by all members - like we know from a democracy-institution, they should be accepted and respected like a couple living in a married couple-ship. (Do you call this The commitment?) The role of leadership can also be discussed: The leader role can change each ...


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Rock bands don't typically have leaders in the way that classic orchestras/ensembles do. Rock bands can have a manager/managers, who organise the administration side of things and triage tasks away from the band members (amongst other things). Some bands might have overbearing members who assert themselves as leaders and almost lead the band as a ...


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As others have said, there is no particular thing. However I'd suggest that being able to play reasonably in time is going to help a lot. Because you can play the wrong note at the right time, you may well get off with it, but if you play the right note at the wrong time - well that just doesn't work at all with other people. (And that's also why everyone ...


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