12

Typesetting baroque music from primary sources is also something I do, and I can give the decisions that I've made on these questions. However, it is ultimately up to you. As Laurence Payne says, it does depend on your purpose. In my case I am doing it partly for my own use and partly for general use (e.g. for IMSLP). Ideally I would like to play from the ...


10

How do you define your "complex"? In your description above, I saw only sheer numbers of pieces composed. This is not a very good measure. I suggest you first make yourself sound understanding to some fundamentals of music: timbre, beat and tempo, meter, pitch and mode, intervals and tunings, tonality, key signature, melody, texture and harmony, etc, etc. ...


9

In a relative major key, VII - i would become V - vi which can be viewed as a deceive cadence. Because of this, you can think of certain sections of this progression dipping into the relative major where VII - III can be looked at as V/III - III and the deceptive resolution as a non functioning secondary dominant V/III - i which is expecting to have the V - ...


8

In Couperin's time, a dot after a note-head didn't always mean to extend the duration by exactly 50%. Here, each dot means to extend the duration by just the right amount so as to make the durations in the top line match the bass.


8

I've found this pdf with an analog notation 3/2 like yours with 6 beamed white notes. They say that these notes have the double value (quarter notes, not eighth) and they must be played almost legato: The example on the far right is notated with white notes. It says “On la note aussi de cette façon6 ". In fact, Couperin notices three of the four ...


7

Depends whether you're attempting an urtext version or a practical performing edition. Both are acceptable.


7

That's exactly what I use to do even when I only read a piece: Change the clefs and also the modes. This is probably not correct in a puristic historical sense but as long as you know what you're doing everything is allowed if it is fun, challenge or more comfortable to you. The result will be: You learn reading the historical clefs and modes by this ...


7

It might be drawn a bit scribbly but it certainly looks like a K-clef, (a stylistic variant of the C-clef). In particular it's an alto clef (which makes sense for viola). So those first few notes in the image are at the pitch of E above middle C. (With the two treble G-clefs directly above, the chord made (E, G, B) is an E minor chord in close position.


7

As noted in comments, some of this is dependent on genre. As Albrecht notes in another answer, military music made use of drums and sometimes other percussion in all periods. Same thing with ceremonial music that often had militaristic ensembles playing at it. It seems like dance music for popular use also made frequent use of percussion. However, ...


6

Baroque music is for life, not just for Christmas. Your association of baroque music with Christmas is probably because of the increased prominence of church music in the mainstream listening palette at that of year, although unaccompanied sacred vocal music spans a far wider time period than the period usually referred to as the baroque. Bach's ...


6

It's a demilune trumpet. There are lots of images on google. Item 72 from the Natural Trumpets catalogue of the Bate Musical Instrument collection. Demilune trumpet c.1840 This trumpet is made of brass. It has a central tuning slide. It is also curved probably to make hand stopping easier. It was made by Dubois & Cie. If you look carefully you'...


6

It looks a bit like a hand-written C-clef. Reading as such seems to make sense harmonically.


6

There are different versions in various editions for a number of reasons. Sometimes different editors start with different sources, either different manuscripts or different early editions of a work. Sometimes editors adapt the work to suit the people who are likely to use their editions, either by simplifying or by following the musical tastes of their time....


5

I have seen the basic "La Folia" described as a "double tonic" progression. The patterns i-V-i alternate with III-VII-III or i-V-i in the minor key followed by V-I-V in the relative major. Contemporary theorists mostly thought of this progression as a bass line with some stuff above it. The bass line is 1-V-1-7-3-7 with the melody 1-7-1-2-...


4

Mixed set of gut and steel (what most soloists now try to emulate with synthetic and a steel E). Gut strings only doesn’t have tone color and power enough to project into a large hall, the common venue where a late romantic symphony was played, specially when you’re dealing with winds and brass a 3 or even a 4, and percussion. After Paganini and Ernst era, ...


4

One name for this is white notation, although that term is typically associated with mensural notation. To distinguish this from that, one may call it French baroque white notation. See for example http://www.sibelius.com/cgi-bin/helpcenter/chat/chat.pl?com=thread&start=692692&groupid=3&&guest=1: No, this will be French Baroque "white ...


3

One aspect not yet mentioned is, that some of the instruments easily associated with the sheperds of the Christmas story, such as recorder or traverse flute (not the modern concert flute, but the wooden predecessor without any keys) fell out favour in the late baroque era and had to be rediscoverd for some different than children learners in the second half ...


3

There are two books which I would recommend for dealing with this voice-leading. It is best to approach the subject in order of the texts. The first is a book which describes the actual methods and instruction of composers of the era, from a historical and theoretical point of view. There is much in the book for instructing oneself to write in the style. It ...


3

A huge amount of scanned, period music at imslp.org is parts only. That's frustrating to me when I just want to study the compositions, not perform them. I've assumed the absence of an ensemble score is because: the music was printed primarily for performance where each player only needs their part, and printing was much more expensive then so they wouldn'...


3

How would you define complexity? Polyphony? Counterpoint? Harmonic progression? Rhythm? This answer might be pretty opinion based. I’d say a crucial criterion is the redundancy. And this also depends on algorithms and fixed schemata, melodic and harmonic patterns, modules and empty phrases. The answer is easy if you want to compare Mozart with Vivaldi, ...


2

Echo (see Collins dictionary) derives from the Greek word ἠχώ, and means a softer, delayed repetition of the same sound, in the physical sense caused by reflection. So it does not relate to a dance. I learned, that in the French Ouverture the Echo movement is no softer repetition of an earlier movement, but alternates between stronger and softer passages (...


2

Echo pieces usually have, as in this one, a short phrase that is repeated, often softer, as if an echo. In Bach's piece the repeat is not literal. You will hear it at the end of longer phrases when the last beat is repeated softer and without harmony. Bach cleverly messes with the metre during these echo moments.


2

I have started practing Goldberg since November 2019 and now I am on Variation 11. To be honest I was not feeling Goldberg was impossible for me to learn because each variation is short and the wide variety of the variations make it so appealing to learn. It was not until lately do I find how demanding the work is. Because first of all the structure is very ...


2

Melodic activity in the bass doesn't necessarily imply frequent root changes. The melody may jump from one chord tone to another, or it may move from one to another by way of passing tones. Both techniques appear in the example you've chosen. How did composers of the era solve this apparent paradox? It's only a paradox requiring a solution by the ...


2

I've been researching the difference between Baroque and Classical and every time it mentions that the former is far more complex than the latter. What are you reading? In music appreciation type writing you get descriptions along the lines of fugue epitomizing the Baroque era - sometimes called the learned style - and the technical procedures of fugue ...


2

All the answers agree on the same. The definition of "complexity" is really subjective. So in some part, you're on your own if you say "This is complex". In order to not repeat what the other amazing answers have showed, and maybe to justify what you've read, I want to give you another examples. Opera is a good one. Just listen a pair of Classical operas ...


2

When you are practising on your own, separate from the other members, then an individual part book is more convenient. You have less music to look at and follow, fewer page turns to make. When you are playing together, having to co-ordinate what you play with the other members of the group then a full score is essential so that you can follow what the other ...


2

A cursory look at the Wikipedia article for opus number gives me the impression that publishers generally trusted the opus numbers composers assigned to their own works, to the point where they did not further renumber by genre or piece type first. Notably, opus numbers are generally in ascending publication order, revealing insightful information a ...


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