15

It's actually a suspension, which is to say that the actual chord is F Minor (F, A-flat, C, in first inversion) but the G and B-flat are held over from the previous chord before moving to F and A-flat. Dissonant suspensions resolving to consonant chords are very common in Baroque music. In jazz, 9th chords are treated as normal chords, so a G#maj9 might ...


11

What a well-researched and well-sourced question! This is a very common pattern in tonal music that we call a circle-of-fifths (or descending-fifths) sequence. Some would call it a circle-of-fifths progression, and they're correct, but sequence will be a little more specific. Let's break both of these points down: The "circle of fifths" is a pattern where ...


7

As usual, imslp.org is your friend! If you go there and view or D/L one of the early editions, you will find several pages of instructions in the preface. In particular, there are examples of how each marking is to be played. Herewith is yours: Now you just need to translate the blurry French, or just look at the expanded lower line. There are ...


5

As the other answer point out you mis-identified the suspension as the end of the phrase, but the resolution is the end of the phrase. Bach's Prelude #1 from the Well Tempered Clavier, book I is super clear example of extended chords and dissonances. This particular prelude started as an instruction piece for is some Wilhelm so it's original purpose is ...


5

Figured bass written when it was a living notation is often not so neatly formalized as modern figured bass used as a teaching aid for learning common practice harmony. Also, most music editions published in this era have plenty of typos, so if something seems totally incomprehensible, it may just be nonsense! The horizontal lines are continuation lines, ...


5

"Anon" here does not imply there is no "exact version." The composer or copyist referred to as "Anonymous of Schwerin" was most certainly a particular individual from that town. The only "anonymous" thing about him (almost certainly him, not her) was that we don't know his name. I would guess that the original manuscript was written in tablature. The piece ...


4

The 5 is not redundant, and it doesn't mean you have "a four note chord." The point of the notation is that the 7b 5 intervals from the new bass note are the same notes as the 6b 4 intervals from the previous bass note. In other words, since the continuo is for organ (which can sustain notes indefinitely), you simply hold those two notes down, and only the ...


4

It would make sense to play them on authentic instruments, at the original pitch, and many performance groups make a speciality of doing this. But there's more to authenticity than just the pitch. I don't see a lot of point in tuning modern instruments down. Maybe if voices are involved. There's also the question of styles of performance. Even within ...


4

Both terms have come to be interchangeable. Chaconne from Spain, and passacaglia from either Spain or Italy. Both in slow three time, and both apparently using a ground bass. Danced to in France into the early 18th C. So mixed up that in Gluck's opera 'Paris and Helen', it was called a 'chiacone', but the same piece in 'Iphigenia in Aulis' it became a '...


4

"The greatest of the dance tunes is probably the Ciacona, Chaconne, with her brother, or her sister, the Passagaglio, or Passecaille. " (Johann Mattheson: The Perfect Kapellmeister 1739, p. 233.) In the musicology of the 20th and 21st centuries, much has been written or speculated about the difference between Ciaccona and Passacaglia, or Chaconne and ...


3

At least for dances from the Romantic era and backwards, music for different dance types in the same meter and tempo are not quite interchangeable. For example, even though they are both fairly slow dances in triple meter, the polonaise uses an 8th-16th-16th rhythmic pattern more often, emphasizes the first beat more, and often sounds more stately, while the ...


3

Non instrument-specific music was standard in the era of Renaissance for several reasons: The number of instruments was far bigger (think of bagpipes, shawms, Gemshorn, hurdy-gurdy, some of these even being built in families) so the chance of a match was smaller. Printing of scores only got wider use in late 15th/early 16th century and manual copies were ...


3

The part as written is for a natural trumpet (clarino) in F. You could theoretically play it on any high trumpet. There is some evidence that the part might have been intended to sound an octave lower then it is normally played. (See this discussion): Thurston Dart postulated the part was intended for "Tromba, o vero corno da caccia" but this would put ...


3

"256th notes appear in Vivaldi: Concerto in C for ottavino, archi e cembalo, F. IV n. 5." -- Extremes of conventional music notation. A complete answer would be a histogram of note lengths counted from some corpus such as Yale's, which standardizes on the MIDI quarter note. As with word frequencies in a prose corpus, the histogram would likely have a long ...


3

As a matter of fact, Baroque music does sometimes get a half-bar "out-of-phase" with the barlines. I've addressed this phenomenon in a previous answer here: Can you introduce fugue themes in the middle of a measure? If so, how?. In fact, just last night, I was noticing this happens in the final movement of the 3rd Brandenburg Concerto. After two bars of ...


3

What ever this is - a slur or not - the E has to be played on the second eight of the bar and preceding the mordent, as in the right hand are first to be played A and G. In my opinion the editor wanted to propose the idea to attack the mordent GF#G with an approach from the upper note A I have the Urtext Edition of Bärenreiter and here in this measure is ...


3

One possibility is to go the stereotypical Bach route: prepare a normal cadence in the tonic C minor, but instead of cadencing on C minor, cadence onto a C7 chord. The following example is in C major, but you still get the idea. Hear it here.


3

You don't need to smuggle B♭, it's in C minor already. The note that needs to be introduced is E natural. If you want something a bit less obvious, try Cm, B♭, B♭m, C7♭9, Fm.


3

I wish the IMSLP had another source beside the Martin Straeten version. It could help confirm the meaning. I notice the key is C minor and this notation uses the modern three flats rather than two flats which was common in the Baroque era. Straeten may have modernized some things in the score. Perhaps too he changed bass figures? Usually a modification of ...


2

shouldn't the the circled notes in the 1st violin part be considered an example of parallel fifths? Not 'considered' parallel fifths. The are parallel fifths. is there a special exception...? In this style parallel thirds and sixth would be the norm, but occasionally parallel fifths and octaves were used. I wouldn't want to hazard even a guess at what ...


2

The site slweiss.de dedicated to Weiss offers an exhaustive PDF of works with this explanation: Following the SW [the offical catalogue of works], the term Sonata is employed throughout. The term Suite is reserved for personal assemblages of movements by performers (now less common than in the 70s & 80s). For me this translates to: just ...


2

The tie is irrelevant to understanding the notation. If you have a figure part way through the duration of a long note, you play the new chord but you don't repeat the bass note. That is very a common notation - for example 64 53 figures over the dominant at a cadence. The only reason for the tie is that modern notation conventions don't have any other ...


2

Your first guesses are correct: you hold the C in the bass between measure 1 and 2, and from measure 2 to measure 3, the C in the bass is held over, and the chord remains the same, C, F, Ab. Btw- "Es" in English is "Eb".


2

Hearing bars 13-19 as shifted by half a bar may be due to the prominent low C's on the offbeats. But Bach rarely plays games of rhythmic ambiguity like, say, Beethoven. More important is to preserve the rhythmic structure of the melodic phrases. Bars 1-8 hammer home a phrase that starts just after the downbeat. If you hear the bars as written, then when ...


2

This has to be a mordent - as you say: You say you can hear and you've found music dictionaries explaining this. I've never seen this symbol before and I'm always sceptical to dictionaries too. But in this case - the symbol is always on the same note and is not remaining to the 1. ending - you can trust the information you have found. Riemann has ...


2

Any baroque music fan can provide feedback, really, and every classic musician is usually a good reference too. There is plenty of forums with classic musical as a topic in mind which I'm sure you will be able to find your general objetive. Unfortunately, stackexchange is not meant to be a opinion based recommendation system not even for websites. Hope it ...


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