12

Typesetting baroque music from primary sources is also something I do, and I can give the decisions that I've made on these questions. However, it is ultimately up to you. As Laurence Payne says, it does depend on your purpose. In my case I am doing it partly for my own use and partly for general use (e.g. for IMSLP). Ideally I would like to play from the ...


10

How do you define your "complex"? In your description above, I saw only sheer numbers of pieces composed. This is not a very good measure. I suggest you first make yourself sound understanding to some fundamentals of music: timbre, beat and tempo, meter, pitch and mode, intervals and tunings, tonality, key signature, melody, texture and harmony, etc, etc. ...


9

In a relative major key, VII - i would become V - vi which can be viewed as a deceive cadence. Because of this, you can think of certain sections of this progression dipping into the relative major where VII - III can be looked at as V/III - III and the deceptive resolution as a non functioning secondary dominant V/III - i which is expecting to have the V - ...


7

As usual, imslp.org is your friend! If you go there and view or D/L one of the early editions, you will find several pages of instructions in the preface. In particular, there are examples of how each marking is to be played. Herewith is yours: Now you just need to translate the blurry French, or just look at the expanded lower line. There are ...


7

That's exactly what I use to do even when I only read a piece: Change the clefs and also the modes. This is probably not correct in a puristic historical sense but as long as you know what you're doing everything is allowed if it is fun, challenge or more comfortable to you. The result will be: You learn reading the historical clefs and modes by this ...


7

Depends whether you're attempting an urtext version or a practical performing edition. Both are acceptable.


6

It's a demilune trumpet. There are lots of images on google. Item 72 from the Natural Trumpets catalogue of the Bate Musical Instrument collection. Demilune trumpet c.1840 This trumpet is made of brass. It has a central tuning slide. It is also curved probably to make hand stopping easier. It was made by Dubois & Cie. If you look carefully you'...


5

Figured bass written when it was a living notation is often not so neatly formalized as modern figured bass used as a teaching aid for learning common practice harmony. Also, most music editions published in this era have plenty of typos, so if something seems totally incomprehensible, it may just be nonsense! The horizontal lines are continuation lines, ...


5

Baroque music is for life, not just for Christmas. Your association of baroque music with Christmas is probably because of the increased prominence of church music in the mainstream listening palette at that of year, although unaccompanied sacred vocal music spans a far wider time period than the period usually referred to as the baroque. Bach's ...


5

"Anon" here does not imply there is no "exact version." The composer or copyist referred to as "Anonymous of Schwerin" was most certainly a particular individual from that town. The only "anonymous" thing about him (almost certainly him, not her) was that we don't know his name. I would guess that the original manuscript was written in tablature. The piece ...


5

Both terms have come to be interchangeable. Chaconne from Spain, and passacaglia from either Spain or Italy. Both in slow three time, and both apparently using a ground bass. Danced to in France into the early 18th C. So mixed up that in Gluck's opera 'Paris and Helen', it was called a 'chiacone', but the same piece in 'Iphigenia in Aulis' it became a '...


5

I have seen the basic "La Folia" described as a "double tonic" progression. The patterns i-V-i alternate with III-VII-III or i-V-i in the minor key followed by V-I-V in the relative major. Contemporary theorists mostly thought of this progression as a bass line with some stuff above it. The bass line is 1-V-1-7-3-7 with the melody 1-7-1-2-...


4

"The greatest of the dance tunes is probably the Ciacona, Chaconne, with her brother, or her sister, the Passagaglio, or Passecaille. " (Johann Mattheson: The Perfect Kapellmeister 1739, p. 233.) In the musicology of the 20th and 21st centuries, much has been written or speculated about the difference between Ciaccona and Passacaglia, or Chaconne and ...


4

It would make sense to play them on authentic instruments, at the original pitch, and many performance groups make a speciality of doing this. But there's more to authenticity than just the pitch. I don't see a lot of point in tuning modern instruments down. Maybe if voices are involved. There's also the question of styles of performance. Even within ...


4

Mixed set of gut and steel (what most soloists now try to emulate with synthetic and a steel E). Gut strings only doesn’t have tone color and power enough to project into a large hall, the common venue where a late romantic symphony was played, specially when you’re dealing with winds and brass a 3 or even a 4, and percussion. After Paganini and Ernst era, ...


3

How would you define complexity? Polyphony? Counterpoint? Harmonic progression? Rhythm? This answer might be pretty opinion based. I’d say a crucial criterion is the redundancy. And this also depends on algorithms and fixed schemata, melodic and harmonic patterns, modules and empty phrases. The answer is easy if you want to compare Mozart with Vivaldi, ...


3

At least for dances from the Romantic era and backwards, music for different dance types in the same meter and tempo are not quite interchangeable. For example, even though they are both fairly slow dances in triple meter, the polonaise uses an 8th-16th-16th rhythmic pattern more often, emphasizes the first beat more, and often sounds more stately, while the ...


3

A huge amount of scanned, period music at imslp.org is parts only. That's frustrating to me when I just want to study the compositions, not perform them. I've assumed the absence of an ensemble score is because: the music was printed primarily for performance where each player only needs their part, and printing was much more expensive then so they wouldn'...


3

There are two books which I would recommend for dealing with this voice-leading. It is best to approach the subject in order of the texts. The first is a book which describes the actual methods and instruction of composers of the era, from a historical and theoretical point of view. There is much in the book for instructing oneself to write in the style. It ...


2

I have started practing Goldberg since November 2019 and now I am on Variation 11. To be honest I was not feeling Goldberg was impossible for me to learn because each variation is short and the wide variety of the variations make it so appealing to learn. It was not until lately do I find how demanding the work is. Because first of all the structure is very ...


2

This has to be a mordent - as you say: You say you can hear and you've found music dictionaries explaining this. I've never seen this symbol before and I'm always sceptical to dictionaries too. But in this case - the symbol is always on the same note and is not remaining to the 1. ending - you can trust the information you have found. Riemann has ...


2

My guess would be that the parentheses indicate that something is optional. Since most of them occur on a dot before a lower note I'd say that they indicate that its up to you to decide whether to hold the first note over the lower one or not. Also since the piece is Anon, probably there's no exact version and so on the top line in your example the parenth ...


2

Any baroque music fan can provide feedback, really, and every classic musician is usually a good reference too. There is plenty of forums with classic musical as a topic in mind which I'm sure you will be able to find your general objetive. Unfortunately, stackexchange is not meant to be a opinion based recommendation system not even for websites. Hope it ...


2

I've been researching the difference between Baroque and Classical and every time it mentions that the former is far more complex than the latter. What are you reading? In music appreciation type writing you get descriptions along the lines of fugue epitomizing the Baroque era - sometimes called the learned style - and the technical procedures of fugue ...


2

All the answers agree on the same. The definition of "complexity" is really subjective. So in some part, you're on your own if you say "This is complex". In order to not repeat what the other amazing answers have showed, and maybe to justify what you've read, I want to give you another examples. Opera is a good one. Just listen a pair of Classical operas ...


2

One aspect not yet mentioned is, that some of the instruments easily associated with the sheperds of the Christmas story, such as recorder or traverse flute (not the modern concert flute, but the wooden predecessor without any keys) fell out favour in the late baroque era and had to be rediscoverd for some different than children learners in the second half ...


2

Melodic activity in the bass doesn't necessarily imply frequent root changes. The melody may jump from one chord tone to another, or it may move from one to another by way of passing tones. Both techniques appear in the example you've chosen. How did composers of the era solve this apparent paradox? It's only a paradox requiring a solution by the ...


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