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1

Robert Gjerdingen used to have a website called monuments of Solfeggi. While it seems that website is no longer maintained the Achieve-It service has a saved copy... https://wayback.archive-it.org/org-1018/20170928202641/http://faculty-web.at.northwestern.edu/music/gjerdingen/solfeggi/aboutSolfe/histOverview.htm If I follow the overview, solfeggi include ...


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It would make sense to play them on authentic instruments, at the original pitch, and many performance groups make a speciality of doing this. But there's more to authenticity than just the pitch. I don't see a lot of point in tuning modern instruments down. Maybe if voices are involved. There's also the question of styles of performance. Even within ...


3

At least for dances from the Romantic era and backwards, music for different dance types in the same meter and tempo are not quite interchangeable. For example, even though they are both fairly slow dances in triple meter, the polonaise uses an 8th-16th-16th rhythmic pattern more often, emphasizes the first beat more, and often sounds more stately, while the ...


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Figured bass written when it was a living notation is often not so neatly formalized as modern figured bass used as a teaching aid for learning common practice harmony. Also, most music editions published in this era have plenty of typos, so if something seems totally incomprehensible, it may just be nonsense! The horizontal lines are continuation lines, ...


1

I would think of it as written. The 16th notes at the end of m.14 are a pick-up into the next bar, which would not really make sense if the previous three beats were a 3/4 measure, making the last beat of m.14 a downbeat. If you are having a hard time hearing the groupings, I recommend that you read and play through this with the 8th note as the beat. This ...


3

As a matter of fact, Baroque music does sometimes get a half-bar "out-of-phase" with the barlines. I've addressed this phenomenon in a previous answer here: Can you introduce fugue themes in the middle of a measure? If so, how?. In fact, just last night, I was noticing this happens in the final movement of the 3rd Brandenburg Concerto. After two bars of ...


2

Hearing bars 13-19 as shifted by half a bar may be due to the prominent low C's on the offbeats. But Bach rarely plays games of rhythmic ambiguity like, say, Beethoven. More important is to preserve the rhythmic structure of the melodic phrases. Bars 1-8 hammer home a phrase that starts just after the downbeat. If you hear the bars as written, then when ...


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