14

I've been playing the drums for almost 18 years now, so here's my two cents: This is definitely a matter of preference, and has to do with how you use your foot to strike the bass drum. Generally there are two styles, heel-up and heel-down, and they're pretty much how they sound: Heel up players (generally found in more aggressive styles of music such as ...


9

The 808 was an early drum machine and has many sounds. One of the more famous sounds is the bass drum which I believe there were several of, varying in length. Since these were not real drum sounds but synthesized sounds it does have a low pitch to it and a lot of sustain. If I recall the actual 808 had only one pitch to the bass drum however you can ...


6

Using a third channel as a loop bed to be used as a foundation for decks 1 & 2 transitions is not uncommon. The fluid transitions are the result of EQ mixing. Which can be done by gradually cutting out the mid band on a 3 or 4 band mixer from the playing track and gradually bringing in the mid band from the incoming track. There are other aspects of ...


5

Thus spoke Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roland_TR-808 The Roland TR-808 Rhythm Composer, commonly known as the 808, is a drum machine manufactured by the Roland Corporation between 1980 and 1983. In electronic music, pitched drum sounds such as kick and snare sounds, are often tuned to fit the key of the song, so that they support the ...


5

Working on single kick drum technique is akin to practicing your single strokes with one hand or a wind player practicing their single tonguing. At some point it's easier to bounce or double-tongue. The threshold you're asking about is actually the threshold you yourself described: 160-180bpm. This varies according to the individual but it is also a pretty ...


5

That's actually not a snare drum but a “huge-diaphragm microphone”. This was a gimmick some studio engineers built out of, indeed, a snare drum shell by mounting a subwoofer in it instead of the drum head. (Note that a loudspeaker and a dynamic microphone capsule are by construction basically the same thing, just the latter is normally much smaller, lower ...


5

I'm pretty sure everybody finds their own best method. I'm a toe-down player, I can barely play at all heel-down, I just get cramp in my shin... So, for me, it was Get a lighter beater [I got a SpeedBall, I'm sure there are lots of different ones out there] & use it slightly shorter than centre-skin. Tighten the spring [quite a lot] to make the ...


4

First off, you shouldn't be discouraged to continue playing over not being able to play patterns you haven't worked on before. New patterns are generally going to be very difficult at first because you haven't built up the muscle memory necessary to be able to play it effortlessly. This was true for me when I started playing drums over 20 years ago and it's ...


3

As Stated in the comments, any pedal would likely fit the kit you linked to One thing I'd say first is for Metal and Heavy music you may require a Double Kick pedal. This will still work on the kit you want. I'm not going to lie there is a lot more to a bass pedal than you think. They also take a lot more maintenance. There are a wide range of pedals that ...


3

I've played with both and never really noticed a difference. As I've never managed to wear out or break either kind (I'm not a heavy metal drummer!) I can't say which lasts longer.


2

I have two pedals with straps and I've only had one strap break on me ever. I find chain drives too stiff and I vastly prefer the feel and responsiveness of a strap pedal.


2

A few comments from someone who has been playing about five years but can't play 16ths on the kick at that speed... Double bass is a whole realm of technique on its own. Just as getting single stroke rolls with sticks to sound great at speed takes work, so too does double bass. Double bass practice does help footwork in general of course, but I'd view it ...


2

I used to use a regular kick drum pedal attached to a Yamaha electronic kit standalone bass drum pad. At least you can practice dynamics on the pedal/kick drum more effectively this way. You may be able to pick up an old one or create something yourself to emulate this.


2

Staying balanced while moving both feet essentially comes down to proper setup and practice. If your drum seat is set too low or too high that could cause balance problems. Experiment with your seat hight to find the position that gives you the best balance. Next, make sure your pedals are in a comfortable position and aren't putting you off balance. A great ...


2

Practice slowly and accurately to a metronome click. Check with your teacher that you aren't doing anything silly. If you haven't got a teacher, get one, if only for a few consultation lessons.


2

Trap producers (along with practioners of many other and earlier styles) revere the sounds of the old Roland TR-808 drum machine, particularly the bass drum. They use it 'as is', and they process it into a pitched sound by adding harmonics. So it's both (as you said in your question). '808' seems to be also sometimes used as a generic term for the whole ...


1

The TR-808, and other machines in the TR series were drum machines. The TR is an acronym for "Transistor Rhythm". Another machine in the TR series, TR-606, was designed to be paired up with the legendary bass synthesizer, TB-303 (Transistor Bass). They could be synchronizes using a special synchronization cable (this was before the MIDI standard was ...


1

There is no "right" answer. You can use both techniques you mentioned, depending on the end goal. Playing with a whole leg vs foot-only can create a huge difference in dynamics, i.e. accents. Also, playing successive fast notes usually requires a combination of both types of strokes. I've collected a few tips on my bass drum page, including useful videos ...


1

It's up to your own preference, but I have never seen a drummer solely use his ankle to strike the kick drum. This seems rather exhausting to me. I mainly use the muscles of my upper leg to lift the leg. Then I use a combination of my ankle muscles + upper leg muscles to hit the kick drum. Between strokes I rest my legs on the pedals. YourMusicMuse has a ...


1

I used to do 16th notes pretty consistently on single right foot at about 100 bpm when after about 5 years of playing. On double peddle my left foot lagged and could only do consistent 80 bpm but I could snap a higher speed like 140 bpm with that laggy foot, just not consistent because a lot of music doesn't require that. I didn't do a lot to purposefully ...


1

Double kick pedals are not specific to 32nd notes! It also makes playing 8th, 16th and 32nd notes far easier to play... your best bet is to get one and practice using two feet. you are essentially only playing 8th notes with each foot then halving the effort it takes. You could also use the "Heel Toe" technique. In regards to the comment, to perform Heel ...


1

It could be a problem of your sitting position and your body balance. If you're sitting too low or unbalanced on the stool, you might get problems because you need one leg to stabilize yourself while playing with the other one. Try practicing at very slow tempos first, as slow as you need to go to be able to play it. Think of quarters and eighth and try ...


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