15

First off, let's start with the definitions of the terms. False Bass (or "Fauxbourdon") is a French term relating to the harmonization of plainchant melodies in which the bass would be a 6th below the melody; thus creating a serious of first-inversion chords as the organum would typically be harmonized a perfect-fourth below the melody. I believe you ...


11

Vocal cord nodules are benign (noncancerous) growths on both vocal cords that are caused by vocal abuse. Over time, repeated abuse of the vocal cords results in soft, swollen spots on each vocal cord. These spots develop into harder, callous-like growths called nodules. The nodules will become larger and stiffer the longer the vocal abuse continues. Some ...


9

It's almost like you answered your own question! Yes, a single line of music can act as both the "bass line" and the "melody". The term "bass line" usually refers to the set of lowest sounding notes in a piece of music that has some form of harmony or counterpoint or other tonal structure. If there isn't much of a tonal structure, then that meaning has less ...


9

I suspect you're coming at this from a guitarist perspective? Suppose you play a C major chord. C, E and G. Suppose there's a bass player and they play C. The overall harmony is a C major chord. Now, suppose the bass plays A. Now we've got an Am7 chord. Perhaps they play D. Now we have C/D - sometimes rather inaccurately labelled as D11 or D9(...


8

According to this Reddit post, the numbers are roughly as follows: Men: 20% Bass / 45% Baritone / 35% Tenor Women: 15% Contralto / 35% Mezzo / 50% Soprano For males, the ordering implied by these numbers agree with this statement in Merriam-Webster, which is listed under the entry for "baritone": baritone In vocal music, the voice or register ...


5

Yes, it's at the composer's discretion, and no there are no Rules of Thumb. However, there are some commonalities in certain genres. Most pop music genres there is a chord change at the beginning of each new measure, with an occasional change mid-measure. In RAP and Hip-Hop, the changes tend to be farther apart, or sometimes not at all. I've heard a few ...


5

Not being able to hold certain notes as well as others could have to do with a number of things. 1) Range - it is very possible your range is higher than these notes you mentioned. I would recommend having a vocal coach determine your range for you. Sometimes after years of singing, your range can go up or down. Sometimes you might lose the ability to sing ...


5

You'll probably find the lowest bass voices in Russian choral music, reaching down to C1 (32.7 Hz). Such low basses are called Oktavists: The Power of the Russian Oktavist


4

You can sing lower when you have a cold for the same reason that your speaking voice often lowers when you're sick - your vocal folds are swollen or inflamed, thicker, and vibrate at a lower frequency. The same is true of being able to reach lower pitches in the morning except for it's caused by mucous or simply from the folds being in a very relaxed (and ...


4

People don't normally call a bassline 'the melody' as such, because... it's a 'bassline'! Nevertheless, it's absolutely possible for a bassline to be a focal point of a tune, and it's a standard feature of funk, disco, and especially hip-hop genres, some reggae, dubstep.... and more.


4

Both are nice. Both can be (and have been) used with the same root progression. Take the "La Folia" progression: i,V,i,VII,III,VII,i,V,.... One bass progression is 1,5,1,7,3,7,1,5.... Another is 1,#7,1,2,3,2,1,#7,1. The second case makes a nice discant to the first bass line.


3

A bass can absolutely play the melody. It's not "standard," but that doesn't mean an aspiring bassist can't do it. Rush would be an excellent source of countless examples.


3

Where do chord changes occur? Is it at the composer's discretion or are there any rules of thumb like it must change every bar, every measure, or every beat? As L38 says, it's at the composer's discretion - with a frequency of change that can range from changing not at all, every few measures, every measure, or every beat... or in theory, even faster, ...


3

It's hardly what one could (or would) call a melody. It's just a recurring pattern - an ostinato. But, I suppose, yes, in the absence of any other instrument, it's the 'lead'. Although to me, it's crying out for something else to go over it all, with a melody... Sounds to me like a bass guitar going through a synth patch, or indeed, a synth itself.


3

Lower notes require more breath. To see for yourself, blow up a balloon. Pull the neck out to make that squeaking noise we all loved as children. Measure the time it takes for the air to run out with a high note, and the time it takes for a lower note. The vocal cords work on pretty much the same principle.


3

I think that it is possible for anyone to develop nodes, but it's more about whether you care enough to try not to encourage it. Also, some people try to avoid people who might have it but it should be understood that nodes aren't contagious. You can't catch them per se, but you do have just the same chance of getting them as that person who has them, just ...


3

Very quickly & very broadly - anything that needs to "carry the tune" needs to be mixed "thin". Don't emphasise the bass frequencies, use the bow attack & main harmonics to make it cut through your mix. You can - though gently - dip those same frequencies out of your 'pad' strings at that point to let your melody shine though better.


3

The bass stands out as the lowest (in general) note (like the melody stands out as the highest.) I'm limiting the discussion to music with a structure having a bass line (whether played by a bass or bank of celli, etc.) and a melody (like a song or a solo; harmonized melodies are for the most part treated as a single entity) with some "filler" in ...


2

I've found this to be quite a challenge personally. Developing the bass tone is difficult precisely because focusing attention tends to induce muscular tension and raises muscle tone making lower vibrations more and more difficult to achieve. If at all possible, do your practice first thing in the morning and stop when you notice tension rising. Bass note ...


2

Add sulfur hexafluoride to the air you breathe while singing the part. Find a concentration that lets you nail your lowest note, then fill a balloon or bag with that mix.


2

For longer-term development, there's vocal fry and false-cord vibration. But probably the best thing you can do short-term is lots of rest. If you can manage to take a 2-hour nap before singing, it should make the low tones easier to achieve because the muscles are relaxed. The "two hour" part is to try to get one full 90 minute sleep cycle. The deep-sleep ...


2

Bass voices continue to mature and deepen into their thirties and beyond, so your true potential as a bass singer depends on maturation and on training. A singer develops muscle strength and mass as well as muscular skills. As you mature and develop more muscle, you need to learn to use it. This is a process that takes time and work over many years. As Paul ...


2

Male voices come in bass, baritone and tenor, usually.Not many men have the ability (or tone) to sing too high and too low. Whatever your range is, that's it. It will increase, probably both ends, as you take more lessons and sing more. If the key of a song needs to be changed to accommodate your vocal range, so be it.If your teacher (not you) is ...


2

Every voice is different. Every voice is unique. I think you should keep practicing and always do it while you enjoy singing. Sing if you have a wish to sing, stop if you don't have a wish to sing. If the song is in a bad key/tonality for your voice, change it. If you have a Bass or Baritone voice it will be difficult to reach more high pitches. As its ...


2

According to the Wikipedia article on vocal range, E2-E4 is the general range for a bass, whereas the general range for a baritone is G2 - G4. I've been singing in choirs for over 40 years and have always sung bass. My range is roughly E2 - E4 as well and I'm most comfortable from F2 - A3. That said, there is a fair amount of overlap between bass and ...


2

Something that you may want to do is slowly work your voice into a higher range, by slowly trying to make yourself sing higher. For example, try practicing something that you think is slightly higher than you're comfortable with. You could try singing a Bass 1 or a Tenor 2 part if you sing Bass 2 for a majority of your choir's pieces. Another ...


2

If someone told you that, they told you incorrectly, I can and do sing into basso profundo range, and that's not a correct procedure. First, irregardless of what you sing, you never activate the digastric (Swallowing muscles of your throat ) when you sing, that's poor singing technique. What's actually happening is a harmonic, it's literally the reverse ...


2

The technique described in another answer is called subharmonics and is not what the OP was asking about. Pavel uses subharmonics on notes below B1 however he is said to use a kind of "forceful strohbass" for notes between E2 and B1 according to a fellow Oktavist who performs with him and the Kovcheg ensemble. What exactly is meant by that I do not know, ...


2

Not a lot to say except that yes, V - I bass lines are good and strong, and so are stepwise ones. I wouldn't consider 'traditional theory' preferred one or the other.


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