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You'll probably find the lowest bass voices in Russian choral music, reaching down to C1 (32.7 Hz). Such low basses are called Oktavists: The Power of the Russian Oktavist


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The lowest vocal note produced by a male is G -7 (0.189 Hz) and was achieved by Tim Storms (USA) at Citywalk Studios in Branson, Missouri, USA, on 30 March 2012. Timothy is the bass singer for the vocal group 'Pierce Arrow'. The attempt was witnessed by two college music professors and an acoustician. The frequency output of Timothy's voice was measured ...


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Just wait & see. At 17 I had an easy 3½ octaves - full voice, no falsetto, down to a low E♭. The next 30 years gave me another tone below that... that was it. At the same time, of course, I lost half an octave off the highs. In compensation, the tone I now have is better than it ever was. Time will tell. You can't force it. It is, when push comes ...


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You can try turning this question around and see how voice leading paradigms result in the different root movements. Basic voice leading holds common tones between chords and moves the other voice the smallest distance to the tones of the other chord. With triadic harmony there are only 3 possibilities for moving the voices: move 1 voice, 2 voices, or 3 ...


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The technique described in another answer is called subharmonics and is not what the OP was asking about. Pavel uses subharmonics on notes below B1 however he is said to use a kind of "forceful strohbass" for notes between E2 and B1 according to a fellow Oktavist who performs with him and the Kovcheg ensemble. What exactly is meant by that I do not know, ...


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Okay, Nick. We've got to unpack some things. Your voice doesn't mature at the same rate as the rest of you. Believe it or not, your voice won't really reach full "maturity" until your early-mid 30's. It is very common for people's voices (especially trained singers) to change several times before it matures (i.e. "settles"). Do you have to practice? Well, I'...


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As a VERY general rule, yes, you'll lose some top range. It would be most unusual for age to bring an EXTENDED high range! I make no further predictions.


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As Todd Wilcox commented, many many things can change vocal range for a few days. Permanent changes happen much more slowly: puberty, aging a few decades, deliberately using bad technique for many months.


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When I have to hit low notes below my normal range, I cheat with vocal fry: The vocal fry register (also known as pulse register, laryngealization, pulse phonation, creak, croak, popcorning, glottal fry, glottal rattle, glottal scrape, or strohbass) is the lowest vocal register and is produced through a loose glottal closure that permits air to bubble ...


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Is it because of my age? Do I have hopes of getting down to a C#2,C2 or even hopefully a B1 as I get older? In short, it is likely you will be able extend your lower range to an extent. Certain vocal exercises will help with range on the higher and lower spectrum of your voice and while you are able to extend that range to a point, the lower range is ...


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I am also 17, what a crowd, and I am able to sing from alto, all the way down to lower bass tones. This was all because I had a teacher that taught me how to stretch my vocal chords. If you google it, you can find many exercises to lossen up your vocal chords. After this, find a song that goes quite deep. (I used "far over the misty mountains cold" from the ...


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While I agree a voice teacher is a good idea, telling someone they can't learn to song on their own is bs. Most people who sing learn w/o a vocal instructor, and some learn to sing extremely well on their own. Telling someone they cannot learn to sing on their own is extremely classist. Not everyone is fortunate enough to afford a vocal teacher, and your are ...


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To hit the low notes, you will need to train your high notes. You will need as much support and muscle training for the lowest notes as the highest notes. Source: my experience: I am a bass and have always trained the high notes more than the low notes. Both ends of my tessitura have strengthened over the years and my vocal range has grown. It is common for ...


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