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6

I don't know anything about the tenoroon, but I would like to share my son's experience playing bassoon when he was in fifth grade, hoping it will be helpful information for you and your son. My son was 10 1/2 when he started bassoon in school in September of fifth grade. We didn't know whether he would want to stick with that instrument, and bassoons are ...


5

You could try to remove the metal cap from the boot, open the screws and remove the metal U there. (Reassembly is easy, typically a metal PIN ensures correct orientation.) Then you can inspect whats there and since it is open it should also dry much faster. After leaving it open over the night it should at least be dry (if not clean), and no further harm ...


5

Have you considered a brass instrument like trombone or euphonium? For me, the embouchures share some important characteristics, while still being distinct enough that one shouldn't mess up the other. If you are an advanced player and plan on pursuing music as a career, I would highly recommend continuing to practice bassoon throughout marching season, ...


5

There are several misunderstandings going on in the other responses, and in their comments. First of all, most woodwinds transpose so that they're fingered the most similarly. This is true for flute, oboe, saxophone, the upper register of clarinet (clarinet's first two registers are a 12th apart instead of an octave), as well as standard tin whistle and ...


4

If it is a valuable instrument you might consider hiring a bassoon teacher to go check it out who lives closer to the instrument. There are so many detailed photos you could request, and although they would be useful, the instrument would still have to be taken through its courses (and compared to other instruments) before deciding to buy. When I bought my ...


3

You unfortunately fail to mention the edition you are looking at for comparison, so I won't comment much on its authority or authenticity. Given, how hard it is to find an urtext edition of that concert and its high popularity (leading to numerous editions), some doubt is in order. So as notated is a claim asking for supporting sources. I already ...


3

When the author writes about "solos", I think of solo orchestral passages, not solo concerti. Even with modern keys and reeds, the intonation on a bassoon is extremely flexible. It's all about remaining flexible while playing when trying to play in tune with others. The more important difference between the baroque and modern woodwinds is the available ...


3

The important thing to keep in mind is, that scaled down bassoons are transposing instruments, so they sound differently than they are notated. This means, that for ensemble play a different edition of sheet music is required. I participate in an annual bassoon workshop with groups in all ages in Germany link to page, German only and there are many children ...


2

Bassoon is non-transposing and is just called 'Bassoon'. Contra-bassoon is written an octave above sounding pitch (like double bass) and is just called 'Contra-bassoon'. There are 'Tenoroons', originally in a wide range of sizes, now (Wikipedia tells us) only made in Eb, F and G, and largely aimed as children's training instruments. Maybe these are what ...


2

The teachers in my region recently started encouraging children to start with a tenoroon or other smaller versions of the bassoon instead of going for the real thing from the get go. A bassoon is very big and expensive while a tenoroon is playable even by smaller children and much more affordable. He will probably be more comfortable starting with a smaller ...


2

The bassoon has some wonderful solos written in the lowest registers. A leak in the boot joint of a bassoon would destroy the intonation in its low register.


2

Never heard of this. But you should be able to find evidence for this being true or not true. If I were you I would be taking a look at orchestral scores and solo bassoon pieces. If what you have been told is true then it should be well known and composers will have mostly avoided using notes in that range. If, on the other hand, it's not the case then ...


1

Welcome to Music P&T. I'm hearing - I'm not hearing it shoot up two octaves at all. There are violin harmonics up there but I don't think the bassoon goes so high. Did they re-record it? I'm listening to the 2011 remastered version.


1

Richard Barber has given you a very good answer. Perhaps not the one you wanted though, so i will add som alternatives. First, if you are buying a professional level instrument we are talking a major investment (a recent Heckel might be advertised at 40.000 USD or more). In that case, you should absolutely test play the instrument. Any serious seller will ...


1

The writer is wrong about the repertoire, but quite right about instrument development. Most modern instruments went through a long phase of design improvements, usually to increase both sound and playability. (Even the violin, which has been essentially the same for centuries, had a long design phase, it was just earlier.) In particular, the complicated ...


1

My take on this, amateur bassoon and contrabassoon player. I believe the comment should be taken into context. It might be that in a beginners wind band the low notes tend to be sharp. This is a common situation with the bassoon with beginners. The low D is often a difficult note, not quite sounding like the others. With training these problems can be ...


1

Tessitura is not all. It's not as much how low your notes go but what you do with them. There is a difference between having a moving bass line jump to the dominant below occasionally and asking for a sustained pedal point.


1

My take on this, amateur basson and contrabassoon player. Start by asking the teacher. The basson is a very quirky instrument, with lots of specials, and is not recommended to be learned without instruction. If going on your own, you will most likely learn habits that you need to later unlearn. Some teachers like to use smaller bassoons for smaller ...


1

Choose whichever instrument you believe you will find most joyous to play! This is to ensure that you will enjoy spending time practicing. Spending time practicing something you don't enjoy I believe will be bad for your overall joy of practicing music. I think all other aspects are of minor importance to this. In my opinion the only thing that would mess ...


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