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18

I'm pretty sure LilyPond can do what you want. It's not the easiest thing to use but since you've already used a text-based system it might not be too bad. Here are some examples and this is also relevant in this case. MuseScore is another free option, which is easier to use and might also be able to do this. EDIT: Here's a lilypond version: And code: ...


12

You're right it's just a dotted eighth note and a sixteenth note. The bar across the top is called a beam and it is typically used to group smaller notes by beats. For example that pattern in 4/4 would take up one of the four quarters note beats. Grouping them together clearly shows they make one beat in 4/4.


9

The one six note phrase is correct, but instead of putting a 3 over the phrase you would put 6 because you are playing 6 notes instead of 8 (just like on a standard triplet you play 3 notes instead of 2). This site shows a few good examples of grouped 16th note triples in examples 2, 6 - 9 with example 2 shown below. The idea is you want to keep the ...


8

I believe that that's just to do with the typesetting and not at all to do with anything technical. If anything, then I think that it may be to help you group those 8 notes together and think about them as a group.


7

MuseScore 1.3 will not create the sub beam like in the first measure. The rest should be doable. If you are not afraid of using a development version, you can try a development version of MuseScore 2.0. I did the following with the current dev version.


7

This to me looks like eighth note triplets. The idea would be to play 3 eight notes where two should be. To notate this you would beam the three notes together and put a 3 over them to signify it is a triplet. Presuming the numbers in your score are scale degrees, it would look something like this: If you were counting this you would count: 1 - trip - let ...


7

Your example seems somewhat artifical, since 5/8 is a strange meter. Typically fractional beams occur in combination with dotted notes and in that case the beam extends towards the dotted note to make connection to this note visible, which adds up to a multiple of 1/8 notes. I verified that in Elaine Goulds "Behind Bars". There an additional strange case is ...


7

That's an easy one: It makes no difference. If there were two voices on this staff, upward and downward stems might be used to distinguish them, e.g. to show whether the two voices cross or merely intersect briefly. But as it is, stem direction has no meaning and is chosen solely for aesthetic reasons.


6

With vocal music, beams are traditionally following the lyric syllables. This is not uniformly so these days and does not match the beaming used for non-vocal instruments. Beaming direction is used for distinguishing voices when several are present. The manuscript (and consequently the Urtext) of the preludio in Bach's Partita III for solo violin shows ...


5

A Voice can change Staff (the respective Staff has to exist at that point of time, if necessary by using \skip as appropriate). Try \new PianoStaff << \new Staff = "treble" { \new Voice { \repeat unfold 8 { \change Staff = "treble" c''16 \change Staff = "bass" c,16 } } } \new Staff = "bass" \with { \...


5

In a single line of notes - one voice, it's only to tidy up the presentation. Notes which are on the middle line and above generally have stems down, notes below, stems up. In your example, the first is slightly easier to read. There's also the thought that in 4/4 and 6/8, bars could be split in half, again easier to read, so if, for example,(4/4) there was ...


5

This kind of beaming often indicates that that very passage in Violin II has a displaced accent when compared to the other instruments: while they follow the time signature changes, from 2/4 to 3/4 and back to 3/4, the second violin keeps a metric accent likewise to 3/4 throughout all the selected excerpt. The beaming serves to guide the player through the ...


5

Answering specifically on the 6/8 signature. The rule given in the ABRSM is inspired from tradition and is sound in most cases. In most "classical" music, this time signature was intended as a convenient way of notating triplets, especially in a suite of pieces with different signatures in a logic of diminution and augmentation or to match model dance ...


5

The present answer is actually very good, but one fatal flaw has resulted in its downvote, so I thought I'd offer a full answer. The best version is: The reason this is the best is because—as you guessed!—it clearly shows each quarter-note beat; note that each beamed group corresponds to exactly one quarter-note pulse. Even if this means using ties, do it! ...


5

Yes, it’s a way to signify another level of phrase grouping. Just as your beaming within a bar can indicate groupings of beamed notes beneath the level indicated by the slur, this shows that the composer or editor wanted to indicate this grouping that extends across bar lines. The beaming itself is already a kind of editorial decision because each quaver ...


4

I did this in Sibelius: It's not an exact copy, but perhaps the possibilities are good enough for you. I had to create a lot of (implicit?) triplets and hide their markings to get it this way. Sibelius istn't free though, in case that was a requirement. (I am not affiliated with Sibelius, but I enjoy the software very much.) Edit: He, I just noticed that ...


4

Looking at the phrase mark itself, it would appear that it is because of phrasing. Although it's not that clear where the phrase mark in bar 3 goes, being at the end of a line. I guess it goes on to be a phrase over 4 bars - bar 3 to the start of bar 6.


3

In 2/4 it's hardly a problem, with four notes maximum when they're all quavers. One beam across all, or two beams is o.k. - according to ABRSM. However, if there were more, shorter notes (semis, for example), it is easier to read when the bar is split into two halves. The same applies to 4/4, where it's easier to read when a bar can be seen split into two, ...


3

Different times, different conventions. In Bach's time it was customary to beam to the syllables. I think this stopped more or less in the Romantic period. Advantages are better recognition of the relation to the meter (which can be a curse rather than a blessing for Baroque and Renaissance music) and less head-scratching for instrumentalists trying to ...


3

The notes are also grouped differently in the two bars. Technically this doesn't make any difference to what's written, but depending on how pedantic you want to be they "should" be grouped correctly for the time signature (see e.g. mymusictheory.com). Insisting on correct grouping may seem like nit-picking but it can make all the difference to someone ...


3

I didn't find n°6, but you can find several others at http://musescore.com/sheetmusic?text=paganini+caprices All made with MuseScore. Also check out this video tutorial on how to make tuplets in MuseScore:


3

Beaming per-beat is widely accepted as a standard; many sources would disagree with the decision to beam across two beats in 3/4. There are a lot of standards floating around--your best bet is to see what your specific "audience" prefers, be that certain performers or a teacher, pick a system, and be consistent. At some point, you'll probably develop a ...


3

Here is an opinion from a designer: When you beam notes, you create gestalt groups and the beamed notes are perceived to be together. Beam your notes in a way that makes sense in the context of the music that they be perceived as a single group of beats. In other words, let your notes conform to your music, not the other way around.


3

What you have looks like 8th note triplets to me as well, since that's what makes it come out right in 4/4 time. However, correct numerical notation (as far as I can see with a bit of research) should have a 3 over the top of the bar. As you have it it is incorrectly notated. This is a great summary of musical notation. It's appropriate for a beginner ...


3

There have been various fashions over the years. There seems no justification for syllabic beaming in a modern edition. I sometimes, semi-jocularly, wonder if the practice might be responsible for singers' notorious inability to count! This is what Gould has to say...


3

One possible problem may be how you organize your voices in the score. Without seeing your code, I'm guessing you have something like this: sample = \relative c'' { g4. e8 << { c8 b a g | } \\ { g''4. e8 | } >> } \score { \new Staff \sample \layout { } } The above code produces: But remember that the ...


2

Note the distinction between a sextuplet (an irregular grouping of six notes) and the corresponding pair of triplets. At least conceptually these are two different things. But if you could actually hear a difference from a performance is another matter (what you could do is to make small accents on the first, third and fifth notes in the sextuplet and ...


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