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10

The three eighth notes (not 16th notes) with the "3" above the beam are a "triplet": three notes in the space of one beat. There are exactly four beats in the measure. For instructions on how to enter triplets in Sibelius, see the Sibelius manual entry "Tuplets - how to create".


5

A beat histogram is a two dimensional chart of how often signals above a certain threshold occur in a segment of audio. The idea is that after plotting the number of occurrences of audio events at certain rates (in BPM) the greatest value on the plot indicates the most likely tempo for the music. A beat histogram is an analytical tool for tempo extraction ...


4

In written music there's a simple way to write some notes longer. It involves a dot after the note. Not to be confused with a dot above or below a note. That dot increases the note value by 50%. So, the minim you circled would normally be 2 beats long, but with the dot there, it's increased by 50% (another 1 beat), making it 3 beats long, thus filling the ...


4

The target frequency (F4) is approximately 349.23Hz. You have to find a common divisor between those two frequencies, which coincidentally is the bar. So, assuming the frequency above, you can find that each bar happens at frequency/4. Then, you can find the frequency for the beat by multiplying it by 3 (since the meter is 3/4 - aka, 3 beats per bar), and ...


4

It's called a sidestick. It's made by resting the rear end of the sick on one edge of the skin & tapping the rim on the far side. Not to be confused with a rim-shot, which is a full down-stroke, hitting both skin & rim simultaneously. I'd point you to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rimshot except for the fact I disagree with half of what it says [...


3

Dotted-quarter = 128bpm means "there are 128 dotted quarter-notes per minute". A dotted quarter-note is equivalent to three eighth notes. Thus, dotted-quarter = 128bpm is equivalent to eighth-note = 128*3bpm = 384bpm. A quarter-note is equivalent to two eighth notes. Thus, eighth-note = 384bpm is equivalent to quarter-note = 192bpm. The proposed ...


3

That is (or is supposed to imitate) a "rim click", or "cross-stick" or "side-stick". It is played by holding the tip of the stick on the drum head, with your (usually left) hand on the stick used to both play the other end against the rim and mute the head to avoid resonance and obtaining a dry sound, similar to that of a pair ...


2

Some way to get this automatically: #(define (Beat_counter_engraver context) (let ((measpos #f) (grouping #f) (basemom #f) (beatmom #f)) (define (mom->dur mom) (let ((pair (moment->fraction mom))) (/ (car pair) (cdr pair)))) (define (is-beat-moment? count gping beatcount) (if (= (* count (mom->dur basemom)) (mom->dur ...


2

The top and bottom notes are in a speed ratio of 4:3. This means that if the upper pitch is F4, the lower pitch will be C4. Since BPM = quarter-notes per minute, and one quarter-note = one frequency cycle, then to convert beats to Hertz, we divide BPM by 60. (That is, convert quarter-notes per minute to quarter-notes per second.) C4 is approximately 261.63 ...


2

A professor of mine in graduate school liked to use the phrase elevator operator to demonstrate that there is a subtle metrical hierarchy. Imagine that phrase set in eighth notes in a 4/4 bar. "Op-" comes on beat three. It carries the principal accent of the word "operator," but it (normally) receives less emphasis than the first ...


2

172 divided by 2 is 86 not 94 so it doesn't work. The reason why is its documented that greenday wasn't very experienced at this point so they actually spliced a bunch of different recordings together since they couldn't stay on beat. The song changes tempo throughout and thats why its difficult. I'm trying to learn it and having difficulty with the ...


2

Why is the ''backbeat'' called the ''rock beat''? ...Why is it called ''the rock beat'' then? I have not heard that specific phrasing. Backbeat is just a general description of putting the accent on beats 2 & 4 in 4/4 time rather than the usual accent on beats 1 & 3. Rock music uses a backbeat. Other styles can use a backbeat too. Certainly you can ...


2

The basic beat of all music (with the exception of Gregorian chant and some modern experimental music) consists of quarter notes, eighth notes or half notes. Sixteenths or whole notes as the basic beat are possible and "permitted" in principle, but are hardly ever used - for reasons of readability, one would notate a 3/16 bar as 3/8 and add a ...


2

1-2-3-4, 1-2-3-4 is actually called common time - it's the most common! Other often-used times are 1-2-3,1-2-3 - waltz time, and 1-2,1-2 - march time, as it equates to left-right,left-right. You're correct that each beat can be sub-divided, making for example 1&2&3&4&, 1&2&3&4&. Or sub-divided again so each beat has four sub-...


2

In order to notate 60 BPM where the actual duration of the sounded pitch lasts only 1/2 second, you would notate uses pairs of eighth notes and eight rests. X: 1 T: 60 BPM Example #1 T: Sounding durations = 1/2 sec. M: 4/4 K: none Q: 1/4=60 !tenuto!B z !tenuto!B z !tenuto!B z !tenuto!B z | The lines above the notes are "tenuto" marks, which mean ...


1

Terms are confused in this question. I and V in key C, for example, are chords C and G. You probably mean notes C and G - quite different - and shown as 1 and 5. In 4/4 it's common to play 1 - C chord - 5 - C chord. on the 4 beats in a bar. Doubling up, using quavers instead of crotchets, often sounds too busy, and would work better playability wise, in a ...


1

Changing your time signature will change your tempo. Having a time signature of 4/4 at 120 BPM for 20 bars will give you a song 20 seconds long. Having a time signature of 3/4 at 120 BPM for 20 bars will give you a song 15 seconds long. Having a time signature of 2/4 at 120 BPM for 20 bars will give you a song 10 seconds long. If there are less beats in a ...


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