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2

I think it's so prevalent because it is the smallest and simplest form of alternating sequence we can fit in the most common rhythm structures. The accentuated 2nd and 4th beats comes from the heavy disco and soul influence that carved early electronic dance music, which in turn influenced all the scenes related to sequencers, sampling, and synthesizers. ...


5

Yes, typically what you're hearing referred to as "boom bap" is what's called (to normal musicians) a breakbeat -- which differs from a steady or "four-on-the-floor" beat, in the sense that the lower percussive element (kick) is on a broken beat. So you have four distinctive rhythmic elements in play. As far as I know, all of these have roots in rock/blues/...


-1

Drums, which are also known as membraphone are a part and parcel of the percussion family. Percussion are as old as mankind and have their roots in Africa (the cradle of mankind) even up to this very day they are still being played by the natives and the shamans. The moment when the first caveman could hit objects against each other to produce sound, be it ...


0

Maybe not all that much in 'songs', except where someone's being consciously experimental. But in the big, wide world of music, it happens. Sticking to mainstream Western music for the time being... Anything over 4 beats in a bar generally groups into cells of 2 or 3 though. 'Take Five' is 2+3. Sticking with Brubeck, 'Unsquare Dance' written in 7/4, is ...


0

In addition to @dwilli, indian classical music and also the bollywood music have songs that are based on 12 beats(Ektaal),16 beats(teentaal),10 beats(Jhaptaal) etc.


1

I had a similar confusion when experimenting in Reason today. Thus I did some research on what is defined as a beat in respect to BPM. Turns out, just stating a BPM value is ambiguous and should include a definition of what note value the BPM refers to as well. In sheet music you would see that as e.g. half note = 100 like in the example @Raven Cheuk posted. ...


0

Even two tracks made in a sequencer set to the same tempo will drift apart over the length of a song. That's why the advanced sequencers like Cubase have tools for detecting tempo, aligning and stretching audio clips etc. Forget about finding two versions of a song that fit together perfectly, concentrate on finding and using the tools that will MAKE ...


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