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1

A look at primary sources would make sense in this instance. At the outset, anyhow, and as Gregory Proctor discusses in his important Ph.D. dissertation ("Technical Bases of Nineteenth-Century Tonality: A Study in Chromaticism," Princeton Univ., 1978), enharmonic tones such as B-flat and A-sharp do not have the same signification in the music of common-...


5

It seems to me that the purpose of the notation is to show the performer how to interpret what is happening. After the ambiguous passage, we do arrive at the start of what appears to be a new section, in a new key, with a new rhythm (cut time not 3/4), at a new tempo (Presto) - though it's not quite clear what the new key actually is, since we only hear one ...


8

The key signature change aligns with the Presto, to emphasize that the harmony at that point is still B D F#, because the bare B's aren't enough to show that. His other late sonatas also modulate briefly and surprisingly, but with more than just unisons, so they needn't compensate with such brief key signature changes. Changing key signatures in the third ...


3

Well, we don't know Beethoven's considerations. I am wondering why Beethoven actually did make a key signature change which only lasts four bars. For such a short while you would often use accidentals instead. But since there is a key signature change I would say it makes sense that the change happens at the same time as the time signature change and the ...


0

Polyphony is one of the key parts of a fugue. It is a main part of any Bach work you take. This would fall under a very loose definition.


1

Yiruma is the 'River flows in you' guy? Sure, you can have lots of fun playing in that style. But, as you've discovered, that's just one small area of what a piano can do. If the dramatics of Beethoven or Chopin don't attract you, how about Debussy? Or the elegant simplicity of Mozart? ...


2

It can be sometimes that music which is unfamiliar to us in style doesn't sound like "music". What "sounds like music" to people is often that which is familiar to them, and often in a style that they heard a lot when quite young. (When I was young I became a jazz fan by listening to older style artists like Louis Armstrong and Count Basie - but the first ...


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The topic of Beethoven's tempi is a controversial one that has prompted a huge body of discussion. Here though are some factoids: Beethoven clearly cared deeply about tempo and seems to have intended his markings literally rather than contextually. See quotes like "...first performance of the Ninth Symphony was received with enthusiastic applause, which I ...


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