50

Jazz is an unbelievably expansive genre with over 100 years of musical tradition; a big part of this tradition is an ever-increasing list of sub-genres that fall under the larger umbrella term of "jazz." Your "(I'm guessing it is)" is encouraging; it suggests you realize it's maybe a little silly to think you can mimic such a broad tradition by "just ...


25

It's called a tailpiece. It's there to keep the strings' ends in their right places. Instead of the strings stopping directly behind the bridge, their ends are trapped in slots, and the tension they produce is taken to the end of the guitar, which saves it from pulling on the body of the guitar.


22

Music theory is primarily an analytic tool rather than a synthetic one. It helps you understand better what is happening and recognize patterns and structures. But your question is akin to asking whether working through a book on perspective and geometry will enable you to draw good pictures. There is more to the creative process than understanding what ...


21

From a pedagogical standpoint, consider all of the things an "absolute beginner" would have to learn in order to perform this piece: Note names in treble clef Note names in bass clas Note values of whole, half, quarter, eighth, and sixteenth Dotted note values Rest values of eighth and sixteenth (and result syncopation) Ties Accidentals Fermata Notation ...


20

You can absolutely look at the strings and frets until you build up the muscle memory and then learn to play without looking. I can't imagine trying to learn guitar without looking ever. Professional guitarists look. It's good to learn to play without looking, but it's not something that should be 100% avoided from day one.


18

Ninths are good too! Even thirteenths. Yes, there's more to jazz than extended chords, though you'll certainly need more than triads to play it, so start learning m7, maj7, 9, b9 etc. chords so they're ready for when you work out what jazz IS. And that's a big question. Start with a New Orleans Blues, travel to Miles Davis and beyond... But whatever ...


16

The type of music you intend to play and whether single or in ensemble/band has an influence, but in general sight is important for (in increasing order): Monitoring, what your hands do. This is a bad idea anyway on most instruments (exception may be keyboard/organ setting buttons), since muscle memory or perception of fingers is preferred. Decode the score....


14

The notation reflects the voicing (if you are having two staves anyway, why write the voicing in a single staff?). But actually executing the voicing with both hands is not the worst idea: it makes it easier to maintain consistent per-voice articulation, phrasing and volume. In this particular case, you'll likely have your hands playing staggered and the ...


12

You need to think of that measure as if it were two instruments playing. The higher of the two is playing a dotted "Β" which lasts for 3 beats, while the lower voice is playing an "Ε" for 2 beats and a "D" for the third beat. It all works out exactly when you look at it that way.


12

Apart from years of practice, which will bring this sort of ability out naturally (eventually), there are a few things you can do in order to help the process along: One is learning to play scales while blindfolded or in the dark, so that you cannot see the keys at all. I would recommend starting with B-Major which uses all the black keys and just 2 white ...


12

The chord built on the sixth degree of the major scale is closely related to the I chord, and similarly the chord built on the second degree is closely related to the IV chord, and the chord built on the third degree is closely related to the V chord. The I, IV, and V chords have tonic, subdominant, and dominant functions, respectively, and the vi, ii, and ...


12

First, I completely disagree that beginners should start with acoustics. I'm not sure where that idea came from, it makes no sense to me. I learned on electrics and to this day I rarely play acoustic, which leads to the advice I give my students on electric vs. acoustic: buy the one you want to play, based on the genre/style(s) you want to play. If your ...


11

Playing deeply between the black keys can be problematic. Suppose you want to play a C major scale; only white keys. Now you don't need to play any black keys, but you need to move your fingers over them. If you want to play this at larger speeds, this becomes a major obstacle. Another example is playing a large chord, say, B flat - E - G - C (C dominant ...


11

How much should lessons cost? The cost depends on the teacher (if they are famous / in high demand / highly educated) as well as where you live. Lessons in the city cost more. Lessons can range anywhere from $20-150/hr on average. Personally, I'd recommend you look in the $30-50/hr price point. Is it alright that I have zero musical knowledge, instrumental ...


11

The main difference is in the price and the quality. The fender guitars are more expensive and tend to be of higher quality, whereas Squier guitars are made more cheaply and have lower quality. By this I don't mean that the Squier guitars are low quality and bad, but (usually) they are not so good as a Fender guitar. By good and low quality, I refer mostly ...


11

If you have the option of an intrinsically easier piece that will teach them the same things, that's definitely a fine choice. However, yes I do believe that you are worrying too much. Playing different styles and arrangements of the same song is something I've always enjoyed doing, and I think it's actually beneficial. Something about the contrast allows ...


10

Your question is very vague, but I'll try to answer it to you anyway. You are actually pointing at three different skills: Songwriting Composition Musical Knowledge I'll explain to you what these skills are and how to learn them. Songwriting Have you ever seen a dude with a guitar playing love-songs in a corner surrounded by pretty girls? Yeah, that's ...


10

I’m a player, not a teacher, but the topic of how to teach young children comes up fairly often on the discussion boards at www.violinist.com. I’d suggest searching for ‘Teaching young children’, and ‘5 year old’. Some of the high points that come up repeatedly: Don’t expect the child to concentrate for more than 5-15 minutes. Some kids will be on the low ...


10

Yes. Now that does not seem like an overly helpful answer. The most important thing is that you feel the importance of the beats and the way they structure the music, and that your feeling is allowed to express yourself in its interpretation. For any instrument, there are a number of ways of putting expressiveness in, and all of those are, of course, ...


10

Exactly what constitutes a good guitarist? If it's someone who can play like some other guitarists, then maybe yes. If it's someone who can play just about everything, and put his own slant on new stuff, then no. Being able to play some songs isn't a bad thing, although playing them from tab is similar to painting by numbers, but all it does is give you ...


9

I do not believe that learning both picking and finger-style concurrently will negatively impact your progress. One of the hardest things to do when learning an instrument is to stay motivated. My advise is: grab onto whatever you can to stay excited and interested. There are so many things you can work on when you have time to practice that, especially in ...


9

I would say that those ranges are a good guideline. Of course, their range upwards is theoretically infinite (or at least until you run out of fingerboard, for fingered notes), but it's somewhere around there that they start getting screechy and it takes a professional quality section to play in tune. You can expand those ranges a bit for soloists (...


9

Okay so if I understand you correctly you are not having any trouble with chord changes when using a pick (presumably to strum) but if you are playing fingerstyle one string at a time with a pattern or using a pick to pick out individual notes of a chord (in a pattern) - then your transitions between chords simply fall apart. If that is what is happening ...


9

When we bought the first flute for our daughter, her teacher recommended open keys and the difference was even hearable for us as uninformed listeners, even if their main purpose is microtonal adjustments in pitch by partial covering. There are two further reasons, which I consider as striking: You are enforced, to set your fingers carefully and correct ...


9

Learning music theory is a great way to better understand the nuts and bolts of how music works, broaden your horizons and give you a bunch of tools to make interesting and varied music, but won't in itself teach you how to write; much as how studying creative writing theory won't teach you how to come up with a great story. Imagine studying creative ...


9

Ironically, I did exactly that with one young adult who had never played the piano before. You are looking for objective reasons. Hard to do but I will give it a shot: Pros: motivation: The C prelude provides an infinite source of pleasure and can be played, listened to at length and not lose its original appeal. Many beginner pieces don't provide that ...


8

A dot adds half of the note value to the note. Not necessarily half a beat. In this case you have a minim (2 beats) with a dot which adds a crotchet (one beat) Remember dots adds different things to the note value depending on what dotted note it is.


8

There are a lot of good answers here but I didn't see what I was primarily looking for in them, so I will add it. In addition to patience and practice, there is a technique for making the chord change more smoothly. When stumming, we usually have to nail the chord change completely in the very small amount of time between the last strum of the old chord ...


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