21

From a pedagogical standpoint, consider all of the things an "absolute beginner" would have to learn in order to perform this piece: Note names in treble clef Note names in bass clas Note values of whole, half, quarter, eighth, and sixteenth Dotted note values Rest values of eighth and sixteenth (and result syncopation) Ties Accidentals Fermata Notation ...


9

Ironically, I did exactly that with one young adult who had never played the piano before. You are looking for objective reasons. Hard to do but I will give it a shot: Pros: motivation: The C prelude provides an infinite source of pleasure and can be played, listened to at length and not lose its original appeal. Many beginner pieces don't provide that ...


6

I don't think there is such thing as having to learn an instrument before you can learn another. Of course, if you had experience in similar instruments it would be helpful, but since you don't have, there is no point in "torturing" yourself learning an instrument that you have no interest on. IMO one of the key aspects of learning new instruments is ...


6

Yamaha are a reputable company who make musical instruments of almost every sort,in all price ranges. But it sponds as if you're a long way from knowing enough about guitars to make a sensible choice. Take your first lesson before choosing an instrument. Ask the teacher's advice.


6

SSS is the original pup configuration, as Leo saw it around 60 odd years ago. At the time, the pup selector switch was simply 3-way. Bridge/middle/neck. We found out that by careful positioning of the switch, it could work as a 5-way, introducing bridge + middle and neck + middle combinations. After a while, Fender changed to a proper 5-way switch, as we see ...


6

You can get an accurate score here: https://www.mutopiaproject.org/cgibin/piece-info.cgi?id=263 , and you can hear a public domain recorded performance here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Entertainer_(rag) (box on the right). Here's the part you're talking about: The score you're working from is simplified, and in this particular bar it's inaccurate. ...


5

Posting online to random unqualified sources will earn you random, unqualified feedback. Yes, college might not be an option for you, but there’s nothing wrong with reaching out to the graduate students of a college and asking for lessons. I suggest emailing a professor at a local college and ask if there are any graduate composition students interested in ...


5

Scales are very useful, as they are a 'list' of diatonic notes. That 'list' is a set of notes recognised to work well together (with a little prudence). I guess the majority of pieces, if examined, would comprise notes from a particular scale - which then can be construed as constituting a particular key. 'Mixing scales' - is one way to put it, but it's ...


5

...Is comparing the key signatures the only way to quickly find a relative chord? Not necessarily for relative chords. Relative chords are always a minor triad below a major triad with the root separated by a minor third. The example above shows relative chord pairs - C & Am, G & Em - we don't really need to know the keys that are indicated ...


4

You need to develop two skills or behaviors, both of which are a requirement for improvisational soloing: Idea generation : your "inner self" (or whatever you want to call it) has to generate musical ideas that would be nice to hear. In a way, you hear things in your head. Ability to play the ideas. Being able to realize the ideas your inner self wants to ...


4

You definitely don’t want to start off with a 12 string, which requires a lot more finger strength and dexterity. My thoughts would be to just go to your local guitar shop and buy something cheap. That’s why I did anyway, 2 years later and I’m still playing on my crappy $120 steel string. You can also check out pawn shops. Gear doesn’t matter much as a ...


4

You've got a lot of opinions, some disagreements, and a few answers. Or an attempt at an answer. I'm going to put my 2 cents in and try to add to the proceedings. First, my answers to your questions. If I'm most interested in the ability to create progressions of notes that will sound "well", I should focus on learning scales, right? Right. You are ...


4

I actually have an HSS Squier. I have not played an SSS however I can say the following. Firstly, for clarity, a traditional strat has an SSS configuration. Getting the humbucker (HSS) version makes the guitar more versatile as it is your first guitar, although personally I have found that the bridge position is not the most useful position for a humbucker....


4

If I understand, you do about 2-4 hours each day. That's a lot at the beginning. I think you should carefully gauge the level of pain/fatigue. The general idea is that you should not feel pain. Fatigue is different. Give yourself enough rest to recover from fatigue. If you feel actual pain, I think you should stop and assess what is going on. A while back ...


4

Here are two pictures that show you the notes and fingering for the Bansuri. The first one is probably better for you, to understand it clearly and easy the first time you play. After that, I like the second one probably more, because it's simple and handy. In the second picture you should just write the western notes besides the original notes to make it ...


3

Schoenberg's Fundamentals of Music Composition offers an approach that goes from small units like motifs up to larger phrases show how to develop ideas. But, about your comments... I don't know how to play any instruments I accidentally wrote a cadence You should start to learn an instrument. Even if you plan to do all your music with electronic gear, ...


3

On the contrary, I think the first option does a fine job of representing the two beats, and it's also how I would expect to see those rhythms in band or orchestra music. I would not want to sight read the second example. IMO, the correct notation is always going to be whatever will most easily get your players to perform the way you want. You needn't show ...


3

Diatonic harmonicas are capable of playing in multiple keys. This is done a few of different ways. The most common type of blues playing is called "cross harp," which involves using a harmonica in one key to play in a different key (usually a major fifth away). For example, it is common to use a C harmonica when playing blues in the key of G. You can also ...


3

You should play right-handed. At least give it a solid try. Mainly for two reasons : Not endangering more your wrist : From my experience, the fretting hand is the one that requires the more strength and put the more pressure on your forearm and fingers. Given that you have tendinitis, you should use your right hand to strum, as it requires less strength ...


3

Chords and scales really go hand in hand. Each note of a scale has a specific chord built around it. These are called diatonic chords. They naturally have a tendency to "fit" together. There are even certain patterns they tend to appear in (called harmonic function). But they are far from the only options. Here is my recommendation: Learn what a scale ...


3

It depends on what kind of music you want to play. An HSS strat has a humbucker in the bridge position, an SSS strat has a single-coil pickup. As the name implies, the humbucker by design suppresses hum (annoying noise picked up through electromagnetic induction from the mains electricity, amps etc.). It usually has a higher output level (adding the output ...


3

The bridge has feet which need to be properly in contact with the violin body. If it tilts, then chances are that it's not completely so. It can be moved, slowly ('untilting') so that it's perpendicular to the body - upright - without slackening the strings, although you may be more comfortable sliding the bridge if they are loosened slightly. The other ...


2

Even "good enough to play for other people’s pleasure at family events and stuff" is a fairly arbitrary level but I think it's possible to give you an idea. You can take normal curricula like ABRSM or RCM as a baseline. They have a system of grades or levels each with a repertoire assigned to it. My experience is that you can read those grades or levels as "...


2

It's impossible to say. Given that you played clarinet in a school band means your treble clef reading should be pretty good, so it's a head start. Learning to play an instrument is divided into two tenuously linked parts. One is the music itself, whether it's tadpoles on washing lines or listening and trying to repeat what's heard. Two is the instrument ...


2

I am an advocate for learning about triads first, before putting too much energy into working with scales. There are four fundamental triads: major, minor, augmented, and diminished. But you could gain much from just an understanding of major and minor triads. A C major triad contains the notes C, E, and G, while a C minor triad contains the notes C, E♭, ...


2

Most important is to learn some scales. Yes, it sounds boring, but certain sets of notes are often used to make certain styles and thus certain solos. Once you can play up and down these scales, you'll soon realise that if you mix up the notes from just one, you're on the way to making up tunes and solos. Let's take the first two - major and minor ...


2

"I just want to play cool solos and licks" I'm going to assume that you want to learn how to improvise cool solos, and put licks into your songs. So, here we go. I'm going to focus mainly on the soloing part, since I've never really experimented with licks myself and will probably get stuff wrong. The short answer: Find out what key you're playing in and ...


2

If you're talking about the 10-hole 'blues harp', the answer's 'yes and no'! You get the notes of one major scale. Obviously you can play diatonic tunes in that key. But we're in blues country. Use an F harp for a blues in C, that Bb will come in very useful! Or use a C harp for a blues in D, now you've got the flat 3rd and flat 7th. And notes can ...


2

The first thing to do is let him hold the guitar any way he likes. he has a 50:50 on this one! My take is that the guitar was better suited to lefties as it was originally, for several reasons explained in previous posts. Then take him along to a teacher. (Someone like myself who teaches guitar and keys!) Try out a few lessons - with guidance from the ...


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