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23

Without. Point blank. Lights look fun to start with, but a beginner will end up watching them rather than learning to read. Note, you can usually switch them off, so you don't have to choose a keyboard that doesn't have them. I have no recommendations on mobile teaching apps, I've never used them.


20

Alas, string instruments notoriously lose tuning for seemingly trivial reasons, especially classical guitars and wooden bowed strings. Temperature, humidity, looking at it... so, better get used to tuning. Good news is, like with the actual playing, practising tuning helps getting it done a lot quicker! Experienced players can completely re-string and tune ...


15

Your question assumes that the current standard is to use electronics as an aid. They can be helpful but a musician must be able to hear the correct tones. This takes time and practice to get right and there are exercises and techniques for achieving very good relative pitch. Relying on electronics to do this is actually detrimental to a musician's ...


14

Don't bother with lights. The player will be forever chasing them. In fact, for a few weeks I recommend not trying to read dots either. Just get used to the instrument, what it can do, and have fun. I would hope that pound for pound, a keyboard without lights would have other, better features.Most will have speakers or a headphone port. Buying pre-loved ...


12

I agree with other answers that the speed to practice scales at is the speed where you can play them accurately, evenly, smoothly, and cleanly. Beyond that, when you ask what the goal should be in terms of speed or where "diminishing returns" set in, I would counter by asking you, "Why are you practicing scales in the first place? What are you trying to ...


10

In tonal harmony, all major (Ionian) scales follow the same pattern of whole steps and half steps: W-W-H-W-W-W-H. When you want to play all of the major triads for a particular key, you stack each chord up in thirds and use the notes from that specific scale. For example, if you are playing the D Major scale, the D triad would have the notes D-F#-A; D to F#...


9

The bridge has feet which need to be properly in contact with the violin body. If it tilts, then chances are that it's not completely so. It can be moved, slowly ('untilting') so that it's perpendicular to the body - upright - without slackening the strings, although you may be more comfortable sliding the bridge if they are loosened slightly. The other ...


7

Unfortunately, notes and chords (triads especially) are often called by the same names. When someone says 'play a D', it could mean play a D note, or play a D major chord.That's confusing, and it's where you came unstuck. You already know the note names for the D major scale, that's fine. The first answer explained the triads. From a major scale there's ...


7

Probably a more important factor is your whole body level compared with the height of the keyboard itself. If you sit too low, it will inevitably cause your wrists to be low, as gravity works on your forearms. I encourage sitting so that the elbows are about an inch higher than the top of the white keys. That way, my students can let gravity help with their ...


7

You are missing the difference in society between 1800 and today. In 1800, people learning the violin would usually either be the children of professional or amateur musicians, or members of the upper class who employed private tutors for every aspect of their childrens' education, including music. So the student would be learning in an environment where ...


7

The strings should have been tuned up to pitch before it was packed up for sale, otherwise there is a risk that something would shift out of alignment. You may not realize that the bridge, the tail piece, and the internal "sound post" that stops the top and bottom of the instrument from collapsing under the tension of the strings are not actually fixed in ...


7

The speed you should be doing them at is the speed at which you can do them accurately and evenly. Once you get comfortable doing them at that speed, notch it up a bit - never going faster than you can handle. Don't just practise the ones that you are good at and know well. Spare time and energy to get the trickier ones just as good. There is no rule ...


6

Since you have no guitar experience it may not matter. You have not provided enough data on your mobility issue to really make a determination. For a guitarist both arms need to be mobile to some degree, especially for certain techniques. I suspect you might think that the picking arm does not need to move as much as the fretting arm but that isn't ...


6

SSS is the original pup configuration, as Leo saw it around 60 odd years ago. At the time, the pup selector switch was simply 3-way. Bridge/middle/neck. We found out that by careful positioning of the switch, it could work as a 5-way, introducing bridge + middle and neck + middle combinations. After a while, Fender changed to a proper 5-way switch, as we see ...


6

You can get an accurate score here: https://www.mutopiaproject.org/cgibin/piece-info.cgi?id=263 , and you can hear a public domain recorded performance here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Entertainer_(rag) (box on the right). Here's the part you're talking about: The score you're working from is simplified, and in this particular bar it's inaccurate. ...


6

Its only my opinion, but my observations in the music store are such that they lead me to think the lights on these keyboards serve one purpose, to sell keyboards. I've never known any teachers that use them to teach with, and I've never met anyone that actually learned to play music that way, so in my opinion the lights are a sales gimmick but an effective ...


6

The first bar could be written like this. The extra C just establishes that the melody starts on that note.


6

What's really bad technique is having a wrist that stays low below the level of the keys, while you are playing with your fingers. This is a very common beginner mistake that can result in painful wrists and eventually RSI. Don't do this. That's why in the beginning many tutors try to keep the wrists level above the keys. It's a good starting point, but ...


6

Yes, your instrument will require more tuning from its original set up. As it settles in it will require less tuning to get it in tune, but all string instruments require regular tuning. Initially the strings haven't been stretched yet, so under tension they will "relax" some as they stretch out. Even steel strings will do this, although less than nylon ...


6

My husband suspects (...) that it is because it is new and the strings are so new. Is that possible? Not only possible, but almost always generates a great deal of disappointment with new strings on a variety of string instruments. The instrument itself being new is less important. Don't worry, the strings will settle in a few days. Or week. Just keep ...


6

leftaroundabout touched on this briefly but no one else has, so I thought I'd point it out specifically. The tuning knobs may be loose. My daughter's first guitar experienced this. I would tune it up and it would immediately slip. Coming from a guitar world, I'm used to ratcheted tuners, but the violin appears to just rely on friction alone to keep the knob ...


6

Scales are great exercises and warm-up material. They help get fingers flexing, and also help one understand which notes go together diatonically, but that will depend on which scales one plays. As far as speed is concerned, it is as important to be able to play them slowly and in time as it is to play them fast, albeit accurately. If it's for exam purposes,...


5

...Is comparing the key signatures the only way to quickly find a relative chord? Not necessarily for relative chords. Relative chords are always a minor triad below a major triad with the root separated by a minor third. The example above shows relative chord pairs - C & Am, G & Em - we don't really need to know the keys that are indicated ...


5

Your question contains a crucial misunderstanding in the two words piano keyboard The defining feature of a piano keyboard is weighted keys, emulating the hammer mechanism of a real piano. Most teachers recommend learning with weighted keys, because otherwise kids get used to keys which take little-to-no force to press, and this makes it significantly ...


5

Lighed keys are unnecessary and counterproductive. For some serious piano learning an 88 key with hammer action is essential. Entry level digital pianos made by Yamaha, Kawai, Casio, Roland, Korg are available, but you have to double the budget. A Casio CDP-S100 is the cheapest option at the 360 Euro price and could run on alkaline batteries. Roland FP10, ...


5

On the face of it, it does appear to be rather a silly thing to write! Play one note for only one beat, while holding that exact same note for four! In fact, the bass clef in that bar could have been written the same way - or the treble notes written in a similar way to the bass clef notes. Makes more sense! However... a lot of piano music is written like ...


4

Several thoughts. It primarily depends on what mobility restrictions your left hand has. If it's grip, then it doesn't have to be a problem - you don't need to throttle the neck in order to play notes or chords! If it's finger mobility, then you're better off using the right hand to finger notes and chords. If it's wrist/elbow mobility, then start with a ...


4

Here are two pictures that show you the notes and fingering for the Bansuri. The first one is probably better for you, to understand it clearly and easy the first time you play. After that, I like the second one probably more, because it's simple and handy. In the second picture you should just write the western notes besides the original notes to make it ...


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