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My thoughts on the matter are that metronomes are useful when practicing exercises and they probably help develop a feel for rhythm, but when performing a piece of music, we should be allowed to play what we feel and sometimes that may mean slowing down or speeding up. Don't get me wrong, I think uniformity can be an important skill, but I think flexibility ...


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I would say that your student slows down because she has a problem with the theory, technique, coordination or fractions of that passage. A metronome could make things worse as it would force her to keep the tempo at the risk of sacrificing or glossing over something which could become hardwired improperly. A dozen lessons in theory, physics or math is order....


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We can argue about how to use the metronome while learning a piece. But once you feel you HAVE learned it, I see no possible objection to checking that you can play it at a constant speed.


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We've all slowed down during more complicated passages! Chances are she doesn't need a metronome to keep time. She just needs to play the better known parts a little slower! Metronomes have their place - although in 60+ yrs of playing and 50 odd yrs of teaching I've never been compelled to use or advocate use of one. With a fairly good sense of rhythm and ...


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Imagine the strings are railways and the fingers are the wheels of a train. You can't displace one wheel after the other. The whole wagon has to be moved at once. *1) Start with Am and E changing tonic and dominant (pattern 123) or C - G7 only changing the index (1) and the Bass (C-G) then play the full chord 123 and turn softly the wrist diagonally that ...


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This depends on what you are trying to play. Some day you may want to play one of those notes along with a note on the other string. Then the touching will be bad. There are a lot of subtle manipulations required for playing clean guitar. Sometimes we use our fingers to dampen strings so they don't vibrate with the one we played. Other times we need the ...


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l don't know how to nicely place and play my fingers on the neck Can anyone please suggest to me a recommended list of steps to follow in my learning? It is worth noting, in passing, that if you had a half hour lesson with a real, flesh and blood teacher (something which I know isn't allowed in these times of almost universal lockdown) then your ...


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It's not bad at all - unless that other string sounds! In fact, it's a technique most guitarists (particularly electric using overdriven sounds) use all the time. It effectively stops extraneous noises from other strings sounding. Occasionally, you may want that top string to be still sounding, or leave it clear to vibrate as a sort of overtone from a lower ...


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A bit more detail following piiperi's good suggestion. First play a good clean chord. Try to have at least some fingers touching others. Then release pressure, but still keep fingers touching the strings. press down again, and strum, to check the sound is still clean. Do this with each chord several times. Next, play a chord, but this time, take your ...


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If you know the chords well that is a plus. When changing chords during strumming, quickly lift all your fingers simultaneously off the strings of the first chord and with the shape of the next chord in your head try and make your fingers change to the new shape all at once and land simultaneously on the next chord. The idea is to make it one consolidated ...


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Practice the instantaneous pressing-down of the chord shape with your left hand fingers, without doing anything with your right hand. The pressing-down of strings makes a "hammer-on" sort of sound. It can't be as loud as fingering normally with your right hand, but try to make it reasonably loud, or at least loud enough to hear each of the fingered strings ...


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One possibility is that you are releasing the string too slowly, so at some point, when the string is no longer pressed firmly against the fretboard, but not yet completely released, it buzzes against that fret. A similar buzz will happen if you are fretting a whole chord, but some of the strings are not pressed properly against the fretboard


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As I understand the question, you play a chord or a note, and when you lift your finger/s it causes an open string to vibrate straight after. You might have sticky fingers, which will pull the string as you let go. You might be inadvertently doing a pull-off, and moving a finger slightly sideways as it comes away from a string. In very slo-mo, do what ...


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If you only want to play the F, you have to stop the string from vibrating when you want the sound of F to stop. When a string is vibrating, it takes a few seconds to stop and if you release the note you are holding, it's quite understandable for the open string note to sound, because most likely the string won't stop vibrating! In addition to this, you ...


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I agree with the above answer if you truly want something that feels close to a real piano. Some of the best brands are Yamaha, Roland and Korg. Casio isn’t bad either. The Yamaha you mentioned has a lot of bells and whistles but will not have the same feel. If the feel is more important than having a ton of sounds and beats then go with a basic 88 key ...


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Look for 88 notes and a weighted keyboard. In your price range that probably means going second-hand.


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12-8 is compound, split into 4 dotted crotchet beats, or 4 x 3 quavers, whereas 4-4 is 4 normal crotchets and splits into two quavers. It's just the difference between wanting a simple time signature, where the beats all split into two, or a compound, where the beat (most often) splits into 3. If you have 12-8, you can have 4 lots of 3 quavers in a bar, 12, ...


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The control of your arm, hands and fingers is very difficult concerning playing the violin. To avoid bad habits I would renounce to practice the violin and study meanwhile elementary music (melody, rhythm and especially sight reading, ear training and harmony. To practice these abilities you could buy a cheap second hand keyboard (max. 100 $). My advice ...


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There are 3 components to making a nice sound on the violin. Contact point Bow speed Bow pressure The contact point is whereabouts on the string the bow makes contact. It should be somewhere between the bridge (the light coloured thing that holds the strings up) and the fingerboard (the long dark thing that provides counter pressure when you hold a string ...


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Usually concerts are played live. Some pop concerts do not feature a band, so only the singer(s) is/are singing live. Except when they don't and their voice is recorded as well. If you think the live sound is shit it was either a bad band, a bad soundsystem or a bad recording. Or it's simply not what you're accustomed to. A good concert, by a band that can ...


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