New answers tagged

2

I took a slightly different route to getting proficient at leads and soloing, and I actually ended up creating a guide book called "PentaBox Overlay Method: Guitar Soloing Drastically Simplified". The idea is this: Take the basic 1st position minor pentatonic scale pattern, and overlay it onto different degrees of the diatonic scale (ie. the full major and ...


0

If you can play scales, that's not much. Think of it this way: a keyboard player gets the scales of the white keys as given. They also get the pentatonic scales of the black keys as given. Hit only white keys, or only black keys ... good music? Scales are just a frame of reference to build actual music on. For some reason, guitarists think that they have ...


1

When you can do what you say, the next step is to find others to play with. Form a band. Guitars are one of very few instruments which can be used for ingle note playing and chords. So make yourself familiar with chords. Major, minor, dominant 7, major and minor 7, will see you through most pop type songs. In this band, there may be another guitarist, with ...


3

Do you just "go up and down the scale" w/o any musical context? Learning scales first, and that's what it seems like you are saying, probably isn't necessary. A better approach would be to learn some songs that you like that are not too difficult. That will give the scales context. Musical patterns are more conducive to learning than straight scale ...


4

Lighed keys are unnecessary and counterproductive. For some serious piano learning an 88 key with hammer action is essential. Entry level digital pianos made by Yamaha, Kawai, Casio, Roland, Korg are available, but you have to double the budget. A Casio CDP-S100 is the cheapest option at the 360 Euro price and could run on alkaline batteries. Roland FP10, ...


0

In my opinion, you should not consider buying a keyboard with key lights. The lights do not help in any way to learn how to play keyboard. I would even say they distract from learning because your child will only watch the light patterns and try to "catch" the right keys in the right moment. It will not understand the connection between keys and ...


0

Sure. https://yousician.com. And it seems they have a 50% discount for new subscribers and a 30 day trial. I use it and it's certainly for beginners and certainly worth the small fee. I've learned from the guitar, bass, singing and now I just bought a piano. I wish they had drumming but how many people have a midi drum set. (But it could be with just one ...


4

Your question contains a crucial misunderstanding in the two words piano keyboard The defining feature of a piano keyboard is weighted keys, emulating the hammer mechanism of a real piano. Most teachers recommend learning with weighted keys, because otherwise kids get used to keys which take little-to-no force to press, and this makes it significantly ...


6

Its only my opinion, but my observations in the music store are such that they lead me to think the lights on these keyboards serve one purpose, to sell keyboards. I've never known any teachers that use them to teach with, and I've never met anyone that actually learned to play music that way, so in my opinion the lights are a sales gimmick but an effective ...


13

Don't bother with lights. The player will be forever chasing them. In fact, for a few weeks I recommend not trying to read dots either. Just get used to the instrument, what it can do, and have fun. I would hope that pound for pound, a keyboard without lights would have other, better features.Most will have speakers or a headphone port. Buying pre-loved ...


22

Without. Point blank. Lights look fun to start with, but a beginner will end up watching them rather than learning to read. Note, you can usually switch them off, so you don't have to choose a keyboard that doesn't have them. I have no recommendations on mobile teaching apps, I've never used them.


1

Learning to play music is about developing techniques and learning to sight read and count the rhythm, not really so much about the arrangement. The focus should probably be on the process of learning and not so much how advanced a beginner the child might be. Simple songs are a tool that is used to facilitate learning through repetition and the performance ...


7

Unfortunately, notes and chords (triads especially) are often called by the same names. When someone says 'play a D', it could mean play a D note, or play a D major chord.That's confusing, and it's where you came unstuck. You already know the note names for the D major scale, that's fine. The first answer explained the triads. From a major scale there's ...


10

In tonal harmony, all major (Ionian) scales follow the same pattern of whole steps and half steps: W-W-H-W-W-W-H. When you want to play all of the major triads for a particular key, you stack each chord up in thirds and use the notes from that specific scale. For example, if you are playing the D Major scale, the D triad would have the notes D-F#-A; D to F#...


2

In general, someone with the skill to handle a hard piece of music will be able to learn it regardless of whether or not they've previously learned an easier arrangement. In most cases where someone who has learned an easier version finds a hard version frustrating, the problem is simply that they lack the skill to handle the hard version, and starting with ...


-2

Start with the chromatic scale. Depending on how severe your mobility issue is, keep in mind that you can play with a guitar pic.


6

Since you have no guitar experience it may not matter. You have not provided enough data on your mobility issue to really make a determination. For a guitarist both arms need to be mobile to some degree, especially for certain techniques. I suspect you might think that the picking arm does not need to move as much as the fretting arm but that isn't ...


4

Several thoughts. It primarily depends on what mobility restrictions your left hand has. If it's grip, then it doesn't have to be a problem - you don't need to throttle the neck in order to play notes or chords! If it's finger mobility, then you're better off using the right hand to finger notes and chords. If it's wrist/elbow mobility, then start with a ...


2

For a guitar, both hands play an important role. The primary hand (normally right except for left-handers) plucks the strings while the other hand grips the chords in case of accompaniment. In my opinion, if you just want to learn to pluck some chords for nice evenings at a campfire, you could really try your luck with a left-hand guitar. Notice that the ...


Top 50 recent answers are included