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You can play the tune of any song, and add some sort of accompaniment. You'll be limited when trying to play sheet music literally though. Please don't label the keys.


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A lot of melodies have a range of around 1 and 1/2 or 2 octaves. Your keyboard seems to have three octaves. You should be able to play many songs, but some things to consider... You might need to transpose some songs to get them to better fit the limited range of your keyboard. If a part of the melody goes too high, you can try dropping it down one octave. ...


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I suspect this is going to be considered backwards to many here, and may elicit some down-votes, but it is not unique. Also my explanations below are more in general than in relation to this particular song, which doesn’t start with a rhythm guitar playing chords in the intro section, though it does kick in a bar or so into it. Many of us have foundations in ...


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I see someone is learning Enter Sandman. Classic riff. Most music for electric guitar has both stave and tab notation. As you say, this makes it easy to find the right fret on the right string. Classical guitar music tends to be just stave. On that, notes to be played on a specific string have the string number marked next to the note; you are expected to be ...


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The staff notation tells you what notes to play, but doesn't instruct you HOW to play them on guitar. (Though, in context of the notes around it, it's hard to see where ellse you could have positioned that E?) As you say, the Tab notation adds information specific to guitar technique. In this case, I think the chord symbols are just for reference.


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First what is the purpose of the chord's names above the staff? They denote the harmony of the song, in case you want to provide a fuller arrangement, or to play it with other people. They can even give you a hint regarding which underlying chord shape is under the current melody / lick. Also if you look at the first E note ( third note ), how I am ...


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Writing chords over staves is very common - it gives the rhythm guitarist or piano player information as to what accompanies the piece. As far as notes on frets/strings and numbers on tab, yes, of course you could have played that E on 2nd fret D string (or 7th fret A string, or 12th fret E string instead). On guitar there will usually be several places you ...


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You may use either a TS or TRS to the line/guitar input of the Bose either way. The input is probably TS since it is set up to accept an instrument level or Line level and nothing indicates that it is balanced input. If you send a balanced signal through a TRS jack to a TS input, the second signal will be sent to ground and not used. If the Bose does accept ...


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Wrap up the previous note. Do nothing for a suitable amount of time (but don't drop your hands. Keep the orchestra's attention). Give an upbeat into the continuation.


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Kudos to @Aaron for giving a detailed answer to this question. I would like to add that these are all excellent jazz musicians from the modern era that have taken the time to study the history of the music and the styles that led up to what jazz has evolved into today, such as blues, swing, bebop, hard bop and modal to name a few. I just wanted to add that ...


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This is straight-ahead 12-bar blues. The opening melody and saxophone solo are in the style of a jump blues, although in the later part of the solo, he moves into a more modal/free style a la John Coltrane. The piano solo is hard bop, similar to Horace Silver. The bass solo also is best described as hard bop. The closing melody is still hard bop, but in a ...


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I think that this -- or something quite similar to this -- used to be called "hard bop"


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Bop getting on for modern I'd say. (I don't think this question will survive long, but you might as well have an answer. And thanks for giving us some good jazz to listen to!)


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