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18

How do I understand the mixture of the major and minor blues scales in an applicable way? The short answer is that the mixing of major and minor tonalities is the essence of blues. Many people draw a distinction between "major" and "minor" blues scales, where in C the major blues scale is A C D E♭ E G and the minor blues scale is C E♭ F G♭ G ...


13

That is a bend or a dip. You make a clear attack on the note and then do a very slight glissando around a quarter or half step down and then return to the original pitch.


13

How bluesy is Ravel's Blues actually? I would say enough to justify putting "blues" in the title of a violin sonata. A little history background. WC Handy published the "first blues" music in 1912 with Memphis Blues. The style is basically ragtime in rhythm and piano texture and uses chromatic approach tones (like G# and B natural ...


9

After hearing the audio and seeing your examples, the written example 2 is rhythmically accurate BUT I would suggest this rhythm be written in quarters and eighths, not eighths and sixteenths. My reasoning for this is it doesn’t FEEL like 8ths and 16ths, it feels like a faster 4/4 with a backbeat on 2 and 4 as opposed to a slow 4 with the back beats on the ...


9

It's a bend: an articulation mark representing a brief flattening of the note.The note is attacked in tune but is immediately flattened - by up to a semitone - before coming up to pitch again.


8

I think the source of your confusion is the notion of "switching" between major and minor, and the resulting question of when to switch. I would suggest to view things differently, i.e., not to think in terms of "switching" between major and minor. If we consider a blues based on dominant chords - so we're not talking about the minor blues here, which doesn'...


7

TL;DR [Long rambling thing about blues, Paris and Ravel's Violin Sonata.] Bessie Smith's first record was released in 1923, the year Ravel started work on the violin sonata. That's 20 years after W.C. Handy - who was mostly self-taught btw - heard the guy in the Mississippi Delta railway station playing a guitar with a knife as a bottle-neck and singing each ...


7

Not knowing your intended rhythm, I'd bet your dotted sixteenth notes are incorrect; these demand thirty-second notes, which result in a "more correct" notation of the following, which I can't imagine is what you intended: After hearing your recording, your intended rhythm is: So as it turns out, your rhythm is actually correct—at least, once you remove ...


6

Officially, yes. It gets credence as it features in some music exams. Cm blues scale contains the notes C E♭ F G♭ G and B♭ That ♭5 is better known in jazz circles as ♯4, but for all intents and purposes it sounds like the same note. I think the problem arises because the Blues often gets to be played with other notes - notably ...


6

The (sort of) generally known major blues scale in key C consists of C, D, E♭,E, G, A, and minor blues scale in key Cm consists of C, E♭, F, G&flat, G, B♭. So, put another way, the notes NOT included are:C♯, G♯ and B! So, if you like, there are three avoid notes involved in blues on C. Given that the other two main chords used ...


6

As per my answer here, I feel that the essence of melodic blues playing is to move beyond the idea of a fixed set of notes, and embrace the fact that in certain parts of the octave, ranges of pitch, rather than only certain fixed pitches, are available. I also think a lot of the writing in educational resources about "major blues" and "minor blues" is ...


5

Making Sense of Blues Soloing; differentiating major/minor pentatonics A. Major: The major blues-melody contains major 3rds but also minor 3rds (and diminished 5ths, minor 7ths: the blue notes, which fit quite well with the tones of the parallel key) The bass and the chords are major chords (the blue notes are chromatic approaches or bent ...


5

The problem is that the term "Blues Scale" is used in more than one context. Some sources quote the "Blues scale" as the Major pentatonic with a b3 added while other simply equate Blues with the scale you have given above, minor pentatonic with a #4. In the context you have provided I think the scale you have described is the minor Blues scale.


4

There are some blues fake books, and they may well be of use to the "aspiring blues improviser" described in the OP. The Real Blues Book (Hal Leonard, 2011) (SONG LIST) The Blues Fake Book (Hal Leonard, 1999) (SONG LIST) The Blues Fakebook, ed. Woody Mann (Oak Publications, 1995) (SONG LIST) All three books appear to be available only in "C ...


4

I've found that it's common to switch from the major blues scale on the I to the minor blues scale on the IV, and that happens here; Nicky also uses the bVII chord on the IV I think some of your questions can be addressed as general harmony issues and in many cases those blues harmony characteristics are not hard to understand from a "classical" harmony ...


4

Considering your situation, I suspect you're pretty good on theory. So regarding your problem of thinking of "switching" major and minor, I suggest you start thinking more in terms of modes. In historical terms, pretend you're playing baroque or even earlier. We have a perfect example of this in the English folk tradition. Greensleeves switches ...


3

There is no blues scale, any more than there is a jazz or a pop scale. Much African music is based on a pentatonic scale having notes that fall in between western temperances, explaining the blues guitarist's use of bending strings and/or a slide, and the pianist's use of adjacent keys. The harmonic content and use of scale is sometimes better viewed as ...


3

You’re right that the Db-G-C and Gb-C-F are very typical ways to voice A7alt (Eb13) and D7alt (Ab13) respectively but they are also Bbm6/9 and Ebm6/9 as well, the i and iv chords of a Bb minor blues, voiced b3-6-9 (no root or 5th). The turnaround is like you said bVI13 to V7alt but since he doesn’t play roots either chord can be interpreted as a tritone sub ...


3

This post lays out a basis for analysis, considers the music in four-bar groupings, and finally summarizes the analysis. Underlying harmonic logic I propose that Tyner isn't playing in a single mode. Because modal harmony divorces itself from major/minor tonality, focusing more on a (scalar) collection of pitches and avoiding triadic tonal functions, Tyner ...


3

Aebersold and Berklee have a lot to answer for! They formalised a system of improvisation that was teachable and testable. But they gave a generation of players the idea that this was THE way to approach jazz. It's harder to emulate Armstrong or Beiderbecke 'by numbers' (though their approach CAN be analysed and studied). I recommend you do so, ...


3

First off you came across a standard education method of exposing new students to the connection between modes are chords but that is just one ingredient to understanding music. By the way this connection isn't special to Jazz, it exists in classical music too. Not sure how you derived the statement "...were the ultimate key to jazz improvisation and ...


3

Music is usually written in the key that it's in. If you feel that is D major blues, then it gets written in D major. The tonic will definitely be D, and it certainly won't have a minor feel to it, so it certainly won't be written with one flat in the key sig, - for D minor. There is usually a problem writing in D minor, as often it contains C♯, the leading ...


2

The modal system is just a set of scales to play over chords. This gives you an option of what to play however it does not mean it will sound good. You must train your ear by listening to jazz and you will soon start to come up with lines that fall into the scales. Answering your second question, limitations of the modal system include that playing purely ...


2

I'm not aware of standard fingerings for the major or minor blues scales in the same sense that there are standards for the diatonic scales. But here are the guidelines I use: When possible, use 1 on the white keys and 3 (my preference) or 2 on the black keys. (pattern "A") When that doesn't work, use 1-2-3-1-2-3 (pattern "B") (This is ...


2

Today's trend in jazz education is to focus a lot on scales, but this seems to be pretty recent. I think it can be linked to the rise of the Jamey Aebersold method. He started producing his play-a-longs in the 1970s, and each one contains a primer on "chord/scales." This series is still being produced and is probably the most popular jazz teaching aid in the ...


2

...the standard harmony tools can't explain the typical blues sound made by dominant 7 -chords progressions That isn't really true. By "classical" music Common Practice conventions the seventh of dominant seventh chords is considered a dissonance that must be resolved. The resolution is usually a step down to the third of a tonic chord. Blues harmony ...


2

The standard notation The standard is to write the diatonic key signature -- in this case F# and C#, since it's a "D Major" blues -- and use accidentals as needed. In that way, it's similar to writing in "harmonic minor" -- you use the minor key signature with accidentals in the body of the piece. Here's an example of a blues in D Major, &...


1

It sounds like you'll want to check out Grant Green. I don't know that I'd stick to one album though. Just pick through his discography on a streaming service for the blues tunes—and there are a lot—and start with the ones that you like. Maybe Miss Ann's Tempo, Blues for Willarene, or Sonnymoon for Two. There are plenty of great places to learn jazz blues. ...


1

The 'sound good' part is subjective. Those particular notes are part and parcel of the Blues. If ♭3 and ♭5 work (if that's what you want) over I7, then why shouldn't the respective ♭3 and ♭5 (and ♭7 for that matter) work over IV7 and V7? Those particular notes are the key notes that produce the Blues sound. Whether they 'sound good' cannot really be a ...


1

Adding to John's excellent answer, the strength in your little finger isn't as important as using your whole hand for leverage. By extending your thumb maybe over the top of the fingerboard, your palm becomes the fulcrum point, and this puts more pressure on the pinky, without using its own strength. Let's face it - fingers themselves have little intrinsic ...


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