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23

As Jomiddnz points out, there's pizzicato. You could also bow one string and pluck another at the same time. But if you want both notes played with the bow, and don't want the bow to catch the strings in between, the only way is by playing on the top and bottom strings with the bow under the strings. Here's an example (OK, the only example I've found): the ...


21

Through @Michael Seifert excellent super-sleuthing on identification of the music edition (in comments on original question), the mark is spiccato. The editor Joachim Stutschewsky explains this in another piece he edited: Divertimento on Swedish Themes, Op.42 (Romberg, Bernhard) On 2nd page has the following:


14

IANAMPT (music physical therapist), so take this as encouragement rather than direction. I would not let any physical disability short of losing your arm :-) stop you from trying to learn the cello. Find a decent teacher who can either work with you directly or refer you to a music-oriented physiotherapist to figure out a functional bow grip position ...


11

Just to be pedantic, you could pretty easily bow the open G and A strings together by holding the D string depressed just above the bridge.


8

Just to add to the other answers, there's this unusual technique where you loosen the hair of the bow and play with the stick of the bow under the violin, but the hair wrapping over it. This allows you to play three or four strings simultaneously. To play only two non-adjacent strings, I guess you'd need to somehow mute the string(s) in between. I never ...


7

If you really want to work on your bowing, do it without involving the left hand. If you are fingering notes, part of your mind will always be thinking about the left hand. By eliminating it, you can learn to handle your bow hand better, and it carries over once you add the left hand back in. The single most useful thing will be to practice long tones. When ...


7

Looks to me like the player is interspersing conventionally bowed notes with left-hand pizzicato notes. This is similar to the pull-off (ligado) technique on guitar, but has a quite different sound. I only watched the clip once, but it appears that the passages that combine bowed and L.H. pizzicato are executed as follows: a note is fingered with the little ...


6

Long-tones. All the time. Extremely slowly. Always. Meditate on your open strings with long tones until they are perfect and serene and the bow only does what you want only when you want it. Long tones. Only when you can play your long tones in this way can you have control over all of the music you play. When I say "long", I mean "long" as in you sit with ...


6

There are only two possible kind of vibrations with a string fixed at both ends: Plucking; the vertical impulse leads to a transversal vibration twisting, leading to a torsional vibration To get the string to twist, rosin is applied to the horse hair so that it can grip the string. You need something soft as an attempt with a stick will show and also some ...


6

Absolutely, but it's harder on a modern instrument As RedLitYogi says, the convex bridge (not the fingerboard!) affects your ability to play more than two adjacent strings. A tight bow means you can only normally hit two notes at once. Historically this was not the case though. Baroque instruments had a shallower curve to the bridge, and they also used ...


6

Heifetz uses a Russian bow-hold. This is almost never seen today in classical violinists and is more common in gypsy jazz. Some things are easier with a Russian bow-hold, you naturally apply more pressure near the tip, and some things are more difficult because you don't have any contribution from the fourth finger balancing the bow near the frog or when the ...


5

While I have not played cello, I do (too infrequently) play upright bass. For upright, there are different ways of holding the bow. First is French, which is more palm down. And German which is more palm up. I have played both ways, and for me I prefer the German style bows. I feel that it gives me better control and is more comfortable for my hand, ...


5

The are defined in the introduction. The arrows mean "full bow" and the other symbol (which is fairly standard) means "at the frog". See the picture for the full set of symbols - apologies for the poor quality.


5

I think the taste metaphor does capture it quite well: while piano and dolce are both “soft” in a sense, they are so in very different ways. p is a shy, fragile kind of soft, in the way a balm mint leaf is soft. But dolce is a thick, embracing kind of soft, more like the way a custard pie is soft. As well as how it's sweet. So, how do you play it? It's hard ...


4

Disclaimer: not a teacher. This is just what my teachers have had me do. Get a teacher. Violins are hard to learn. You have so much more control over all aspects of sound production on a violin compared to a piano or a guitar (particularly a piano) that you also get a million more ways to do it wrong and make a horrible noise. As with all instruments, the ...


4

This is a violin, not a piano. There is a large number of degrees of freedom for all of the playing action. You don't just strike a tone and it's there. You have to control it from start to end with a bow that has completely different weighting and leverage depending on its ever-changing point of contact. Getting all movements to work well and smoothly ...


4

Absolutely; you just write a little marking to indicate to the performer when to switch between pizzicato and regular bowing. In the score, we use the call arco to signal that the performer should bow regularly. It's similar with brass instruments: a composer tells them to use a mute, and then a composer tells them when to quit using the mute. Note that ...


4

given that the eighth notes are so short anyway(tempo is quarter note = 138 BPM) "Staccato" literally means "separated," not "short." A staccato eighth note at 138 BPM will still need to be shorter than a regular eighth note at 138 BPM - what matters is the separation of the notes, not the actual duration of the pitch. Personally, I would add the staccato ...


3

Try this exercise (I believe it has been suggested to me on this site elsewhere): set a timer for one minute get a camera to record yourself in such a manner that the camera is looking parallel at the violin start your bow at the frog as the timer starts continue to drag it all the way to the tip but FILL THE WHOLE MINUTE WITH ONE BOW (you can always start ...


3

Your pinky is only redundant because your ring and middle finger are not doing their job. Balancing the bow happens mostly between the fingers with largest leverage, namely index finger and pinky. Controlling bow tilt happens in the grip triangle of thumb, middle and ring finger. To have control in all directions, middle and ring finger need to actually ...


3

Yes, I agree that you are probably right. The arrows mostly likely indicate using the whole bow. I have been a professional double bass player for about 40 years and I have never come across those symbols. They are not standard. If the second symbol does mean play at the frog, it is slightly unusual since it is a pp passage and would be more comfortable ...


3

piano is simply p: more quietly than mp, but not as quietly as pp. Dolce means, as you say, 'sweetly', and I think it often suggests a degree of simplicity in the playing. The composer might have written espress. but has chosen NOT to. I think such passages should be played with little rubato and with little vibrato. Music marked dolce is tender, often ...


3

The first arrow is tying into the eighth note. The quarter notes at the beginning of the phrases indicate a three count, at D, D, DE in the first bar, so the sixteenth notes would be a sextuplet run, tying the last note of the second sextuplet into the eighth note. I suspect that the last two eighth notes would be played Portato, separating the notes with ...


3

Slurs are ambiguous: they may mean ties between note heads (notational convention), bow direction (technical instruction), or phrasing (musical expression). There's no particular reason why all three couldn't be in effect at some point.


3

First, I view the ties above the notes (last beat and a half of the measures) as a phrasing indicator, to ensure you lead the final triplet into the last beat smoothly. Next, I suspect the composer wants you to maintain the initial note (the down-stem quarter notes) thru the beat as a "drone" under the triplets. So, double-stops. Finally, the tie ...


3

First of all Itzhak Perlman and Hilary Hahn are masters who have developped their playing skills far beyond the basics, but they still know their basics and there is no doubt that their technique has a solid base. I think Itzhak Perlman's bow is straight. When it is not straight it is build upon a straight bow as the base as far as I can see. Hilary Hahn's ...


2

Jerky bowing comes down to a lot of things. One thing is that the balance of the bow is strikingly different at the tip and the nut. At the tip, you put pressure on the bow with your index finger with the thumb as pivot, middle and ring finger stabilizing the bow and the pinky on the screw giving a countercontrol for the pivot. All fingers are curved, no ...


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