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34

I would strongly advise you NOT to buy any instruments. You don't need to. Do you imagine composers play lots of instruments? They don't. The only instrument Berlioz played was a guitar - tolerably - yet he wrote a book on orchestration! What possible use would it have been to Ravel if he had learnt to play the harp?!! If you buy a violin you'll end up ...


25

On some types of whistle if you blow really hard you can get the second harmonic, sounding one octave higher than the fundamental. A recorder is essentially a whistle with the length of the resonating chamber controlled by the fingers, and you can very easily overblow an octave. Brass instruments more easily play their overtones because you're in direct ...


22

In the British Brass Band Tradition, the Baritone is a member of the Saxhorn family, whereas the Euphonium is a member of the Tuba family. The Euphonium has a wider bore and a more conical flare over more of the instrument's length, compared to the smaller, shorter Baritone flare. Generally, most Reasonable Euphoniums in the UK will have 4 Valves, arranged ...


21

Great question! I just happen to have the Prelude on my desk at the moment - you've got a really interesting project on your hands there, but quite a lot of work - good luck! Hopefully I can add to jjmusicnotes really useful advice with some ideas that will make this a far simpler project for you. Firstly, from your question, it seems like you are "half-...


21

Vent. is an abbreviation for Ventil, which is the German for valve. Ord. probably denotes ordinary, for non-valved trumpets, i.e. bugles. If you look through the Vent. parts, they do feature chromatic notes, which would require valves. The Ord. parts are all bugle notes, except these bugles have a lowest open note which is an octave lower than today's ...


21

While the total length of a brass instrument is basically fixed, the ratio of conical to cylindrical piping is not set in stone for a trombone. It is true that the 6th partial is generally quite sharp, and needs to be lowered. There are several components that can affect the partials relative to one another, including: Mouthpiece cup depth Leadpipe (venturi)...


18

Musical instruments are classified by the way the sound is produced. The material is immaterial and brass and woodwind instruments can both be made from metal, plastic or wood. Woodwind instruments are those where you blow across an opening (flute), or use a single reed (sax, clarinet), or double reed (oboe, bassoon). I think pipe organs are in this class ...


16

You begin by listening to individual instruments, to learn what they sound like, and the variations in their sound. Solo pieces, quartets, etc. are one way to do this. Searching Youtube for instrument tutorials is another. I got my start in instrument recognition with Piccolo, Saxo et Compagnie when I was about 3 years old. Then try recognizing instruments ...


14

Yes. They might be brash and full of bravado, but they will see the long term effects when they age. They will not be able to play for as long during their lifetime as they would if they were healthy. Quite simply: Wind instruments need wind. Smoking inhibits your ability to create wind. Therefore, reduced wind production reduces tone production, stamina,...


14

There are several compositions written in purpose to present the orchestra, the instrument sections and the single instruments to the audience and especially for children like Peter and the wolf (Sergej Prokofiev) and The young persons guide to the orchestra (Benjamin Britten). You may listen to any youtube videos, watching or only listening. a) camera ...


13

The reason that you can get multiple notes from a bugle is that you can vary your embouchure. If you tighten your mouth, and blow harder, you'll get a higher note because your lips move faster. The bugle is essentially an amplifier of the sound that you make with your lips. It can only amplify frequencies that it resonates to, which is why the bugle has a ...


13

Get an idea, how each instrument sounds separately (as covered in other answers) Train to read scores of ensembles with increasing number of instruments while listening. For orchestra pieces like symphonies start with smaller setting like Haydn. (Mahler, Berlioz, Wagner are a league above). Pieces with a singer are helpful (e.g. cantatatas and oratorios), ...


12

As the horn section you met has demonstrated - smoking and brass playing are not completely incompatible. People can play brass, and play well, despite smoking, at least for a period. Smoking definitely damages your ability to breathe; it reduces lung capacity; it stiffens lung tissue; it narrows breathing passages; it causes excess mucus; it reduces blood ...


12

Very little if anything. The sound quality is affected by the bore profile (change in cross-sectional area along the tube). The amount of power needed to produce a clean output depends both on the frequency (wavelength) generated and the shape of the bell. The bell acts as an impedance-matching device to allow the physical pressure wave in the tube to ...


12

This is a famous question for tuba players, but I'm not sure there's a single answer for you; I ultimately think it depends on what you want to privilege. (And before I proceed with my answer, I'll go ahead and say that I'm a tubist who only owns a CC, even though I'd love to own an F! I subbed for some professional orchestras back in the day, but these days ...


10

The simple answer from a historical perspective is that valves on brass instruments were an addition to simple coiled horns like the bugle and hunting horn. It's kind of counterintuitive to add something in order to take away something; why not add something that adds something? Add the valve, and add its pipe; with the valve not depressed, the instrument is ...


10

Think of a bugle in C. Bugles have no valves, and the notes you can produce on them are only the following: C - G - C - E - G - Bb - C - D - E - ... These match the overtone series of C. On the trumpet, however, you have valves, which enable you to play additional notes. Press the second valve and the length of tubing increases in the amount needed to ...


10

Welcome to the wonderful world of transposing instruments. As you've identified, the factors at play here are: The flugelhorn is indeed a transposing instrument, in Bb. That means it plays a tone (not semitone) lower than written. If you play a written C on a flugelhorn, it will really be a Bb. The flugelhorn is a wind instrument, which will not play in ...


9

As Matthew indicated in his comment, once the wavelength of the sound gets smaller than the diameter of the tubing, the trumpet will no longer behave like a column of air. This means that, at these wavelengths, the trumpet will not support the resonance modes that make up its behaviour at normal frequencies. I.e. not sound like a trumpet (to the extent ...


9

Unfortunately, the answer to your question is one that you can only ultimately provide. Orchestration is an art form unto itself, and your choices are personal and unique to your sense of nuance and knowledge of the music. For example, a particular melody or line given to a cornet will sound differently if given to the flugelhorn instead; though the same ...


9

Adding to the narrative in other answers, here is a chart that might help further explain why brass players tend to prefer sheet music written in keys with flats. As is shown, written keys that exclude the “worst-to-play usual notes” (elaborated below) on common brass instruments (except French horn) are overwhelmingly keys with flats. This is ...


9

Apparently, it is possible to play some melodies on the Vuvuzela, although not in quite the same way as on a trumpet or horn (FAQ). The difference is probably that most football fans are football fans first, taxi drivers/fruit merchants/whatever second, and not professional musicians at all. They can no more use these methods than an ordinary person could ...


9

user65726's answer has some of the basics, but to expand on that a bit: The question asks for two things, which do not necessarily always come together: "musical stable pitches" and "harmonics." First a little background. To be clear, harmonics are not necessarily the same as overtones. A harmonic is an overtone which is an integer multiple of a ...


9

This is a massive topic that I'm not really qualified to talk about, but "length of tubing" is a highly idealized model. In actuality, every bend in the tube and every change in bore diameter will knock things away from this ideal. If an antinode for a harmonic sits close to some irregularity like this, the resonance will get modified in some way.


8

One of the best bits of advice I've had about writing good, comfortable sounding trumpet parts is "keep it on the stave". Sure, the trumpet range extends beyond this, both above and below the stave, but the range on the stave is comfortable and will generally blend well with other instruments. Back when I started composing and arranging (a pretty long time ...


8

Summary A whistle with a much smaller resonating chamber has only a very small set of frequencies it resonates at. A bugle, much longer with a horn on one end, resonates at many frequencies. Both start with broadband noise, but the whistle can only resonate at one frequency, while the bugle can resonate at several. Therefore the bugler can adjust the ...


8

There will be differences in the tone quality, because the baritone/euphonium is a conical bore instrument whereas the trombone is a cylindrical bore. (Generally speaking, this means that the trombone will have a brighter tone than the baritone/euphonium.) But in terms of range, the two instruments are pretty similar, and the baritone can certainly play the ...


8

To answer part of your question, concerning why keyed brass instruments don't work out: The "puckered lips" which produce the note in a brass instrument create a sound pressure wave which is very nearly a square wave. By comparison, a flute produces close to a sine wave, and clarinet/sax a sort of triangle wave. Now, what the keys/holes in a woodwind do ...


8

The first valved horns, made by Heinrich Stölzel in 1814, had only 2 valves (arranged the same as modern 1st and 2nd). On one of these horns, if you play the notes of a C major scale from C4 to C5 (or from G3 to G4) (8 notes): four are open, two use the tone valve on its own, one uses the semitone valve on its own, and one uses both together. F major has ...


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