Hot answers tagged

34

I would strongly advise you NOT to buy any instruments. You don't need to. Do you imagine composers play lots of instruments? They don't. The only instrument Berlioz played was a guitar - tolerably - yet he wrote a book on orchestration! What possible use would it have been to Ravel if he had learnt to play the harp?!! If you buy a violin you'll end up ...


12

This is a famous question for tuba players, but I'm not sure there's a single answer for you; I ultimately think it depends on what you want to privilege. (And before I proceed with my answer, I'll go ahead and say that I'm a tubist who only owns a CC, even though I'd love to own an F! I subbed for some professional orchestras back in the day, but these days ...


10

Embouchure and valve manipulation can influence the exact pitch of a tone on all wind instruments. For proof, just listen to any jazz trumpet player! The effect is larger on some instruments than others, but it's easily large enough to switch between a just and a well-tempered third, for instance.


8

The first valved horns, made by Heinrich Stölzel in 1814, had only 2 valves (arranged the same as modern 1st and 2nd). On one of these horns, if you play the notes of a C major scale from C4 to C5 (or from G3 to G4) (8 notes): four are open, two use the tone valve on its own, one uses the semitone valve on its own, and one uses both together. F major has ...


7

Sibelius doesn't know about Bombardons, but the important thing is to look at what follows the instrument name, e.g. "in Es" or "in Bes", which mean respectively "in E flat" or "in B flat". In the snippet below, all three instruments are sounding a concert C. Double bass is non-transposing. E flat bass performs A ...


6

I believe that the instrument you are best served by getting is a professional notation program with good orchestral sounds. The two that I personally have experience of is Dorico and Sibelius. The notation program will allow you, to a certain externt, hear the instruments and orchestration. Next, get a lot of musician friends. Preferrably musicians that ...


6

TLDR: Scroll to the end of the post. The source of the problem is that what trumpet players call "pedal tones" depend on how "pedal tones" are defined. Pedal tones on most brass instruments are usually defined as the fundamental pitch.... Trumpets are a slightly different animal, though. First, the design of the trumpet has an ...


5

The pitch difference between a note name in Just Intonation and the same note name in 12-EDO is very small. A trumpet player wouldn't need to use valves to adjust from one intonation system to the other. It can all be achieved via the embouchure. When you play Just-Intoned notes you listen hard and adjust until the harmonics of the note you're playing "...


5

Because the aperture (the center of the embouchure, where the air column comes through) must be larger and the vibration created "wider" for lower notes, a larger volume of air is required per duration of time a low note is sounded, compared to higher pitches. For higher notes, because the aperture is smaller, the "same" volume of air as ...


3

The basic answer Each of the tubes that comes out of a valve on a trumpet can be moved in or out a little to handle certain changes in intonation. Just taking a cursory look at the numbers, so long as you manage to keep them in the right intonation in one register, they will be in tune in all registers. That said, the trumpet's open notes (C4-G4-C5-E5-G5-C6) ...


3

Modern brass instruments do not have "sound holes" -- all of the air blown into the horn exits through the bell of the instrument. On woodwinds, air comes out both the sound holes and the bell. How much air vents through the holes depends on how many holes you have open. The more open holes, the less air will exit through the bell, and the more ...


2

Oh, it is absolutely possible. I've heard an adventurous trumpet player play a simple melody on it. However, it's not easy and the other notes sound even worse than the one tone. So why bother…


2

Ta-ta-ka is the standard, but the primary concern is that each tone receive its proper emphasis. So if this can be achieved with ta-ka-ta or even ka-ta-ta, then ultimately the technique is of less importance. I practice all three just because it's good practice. In performance I've always fallen back on ta-ta-ka. In the specific case mentioned, I use ta-ka-...


2

A French horn and a double bass - that's the answer. But it's a moot point, because the presupposition of the question is wrong. No one in the history of music became a musician, or a "better musician" by "acquiring an instrument". (since this answer got got both upvoted and downvoted, let me justify the selection: these two are ...


2

Check here for the basics: Trumpet Peculiar Frequency spectrum In the above answer, it’s stated that the trumpet’s “natural” overtone series of only odd harmonics is altered by the flare of the bell and the shape of the mouthpiece so that instead of being only the odd harmonics, it has essentially a normal harmonic series, but the fundamental is missing. A ...


2

Orchestral trombonists happily tune to A. We can refer it to the 1st position D, in much the same way that a violinist doesn't need to be given different notes for his other three strings! And we know where 2nd position A is on our slides. Also, our tuning slides aren't reset to zero when the instrument goes in the case. If it was in the right place for ...


2

In Brass bands the instruments are tuned by a given Bb => playing C or G (Eb instruments). In the orchestra I actually don’t know: The oboist can give them a Bb or F to tune their zero position or they will be able to take the Bb by ear a semitone higher than the given A. They can tune with the trumpets giving them an concert Bb


2

Is this a quality instrument? No leaks? (check the water key.) A brass instrument CAN have a 'bad note', though it's more common on valved instruments which have to be designed to be in tune. No such restriction on trombone where we have the choice of choosing the optimum slide position - different for every note if necessary! Is it the same using another ...


2

I think the answer has to be clearer. First: many trumpets *) have adjustable sliders on first and third valve. These allow the player to adjust the length of the tubing, that is lower the tone slightly. The first valve slide is operated with left hand thumb, the third valve slide is operated with the left hand ring finger. If you look at a picture of a ...


1

In a symphony orchestra almost every every player is able to fine-tune the pitch of notes while playing. The absolute exceptions are the piano (if used), harp, open notes on stringed instruments, and tuned percussion. The oboeist gets to maintain a stable note (A) for everyone else to tune to. String players tune open notes. Wind players including brass ...


1

The wikipedia page which he linked in his answer describes false tones as follows: "The fundamental is chromatically discontinuous with the lowest 2nd harmonic reachable on a three-valve instrument ... [False tones] have a pitch between the normal range and the fundamental." So for example, a three-valve brass instrument in BBb (i.e. BBb Tuba) ...


1

I'm a trumpet player, and I "just stop blowing" to end notes. When I tried the "inhale to stop" approach, the initial results were that the pitch sagged right at the end; however, I believe I could eliminate that with practice. The other difference is that the "just stop blowing" ending is a bit "rounder" -- more ...


1

Consider a garden hose with a multi-sprayer attachment, where you can rotate the sprayer to provide different out flows (eg.: mist, jet, cone, etc.). If you use the "jet" setting, you'll get water jetting out of the hose. It's moving very fast, but (even ignoring splashes) you'll fill a bucket up faster if you use the "rinse" setting (or ...


1

faster air I have never heard! faster must concern the vibration of the lips which is built by the pressure of the air, the closing and the tension of the lips to produce higher tones. Lower tones need more air and looser lip pressure, less tension -> slower vibration.


1

What you are doing on piano is going to work the same way on wind instruments: transposing a semitone or a tritone gives you all the technical contrast you could want. What you can do on wind instruments, that doesn't make the same sense on piano, is transpose things an octave, or even multiple octaves. Playing something in another octave mostly provides a ...


1

The Euphonium has a fuller, rounder tone and a fuller volume than the Baritone. They are both tuned in Bb. The tenor horn in UK is actually an Alto instrument and tuned in Eb. Its sound is „similar“ to the Flugelhorn. The Bariton part is often higher than the Euphonium. The latter is also called the “violoncello” of the brass band because of its counterpart (...


1

Explaining how to buzz is pretty difficult in words; it's a bit like explaining to a non-native speaker of a language how to create a particular dipthong (like the English "th"). But I would say there are three main factors in creating a buzz: First, you need enough airflow. My embouchure can be perfect, but if there isn't enough air blowing past ...


1

Piano. It has all notes, in spite of not being able to produce Legato and Tremolo perfectly.


1

I believe you should satisfy your curiosity, but you might stop short of purchasing the instruments. Perhaps you could borrow or rent a larger variety, so that you have some familiarity, and then as composers do (and @OldBrixtonian wrote), you can consult with genuine experts on those instruments when necessary. Having some direct knowledge of strings, winds,...


1

The way I understand it, French horn is itself an alto instrument, or at least one that more often than not plays within the alto range. As evidence of this, consider the fact that, when composers write chords for the brass section to play, the horns are usually given notes between those played by the trumpets (soprano) and the trombones (tenor). Furthermore,...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible