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The two most important requirements for resonance are a stable enclosure volume (small or large) and air particles for an instrument that uses air to produce a tone, but solid materials also resonate, just consider a chime or cymbal, and size is still an important factor to consider when choosing a preferred tone. The shape of the internal volume may affect ...


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Most of the fabric used for cases (that I see in the US) is Nylon or Nylon based fabric. For a slip cover that goes over a hard case such as you find on Flute and sometimes Clarinet cases, you should be able to hand wash the slip cover with washing soap. For soft covered hard cases, such as covered plywood or covered Styrofoam, you can't really wash them ...


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For regular cleaning I would just use mild soap and water. Anything more powerful could damage metall or pads of the instrument. Since mould actually cries for something else, e.g. vinegar, I would dispose that soft case.


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The key general feature for getting harmonics is that the sound generating mechanism be (effectively) 1-dimensional. Whether straight, like a flute, or bent up, like a bassoon, all pitched woodwinds (and brass, and strings...) have a resonator/oscillator that is much much longer than its size in the transverse directions. — By harmonics I mean overtones ...


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user65726's answer has some of the basics, but to expand on that a bit: The question asks for two things, which do not necessarily always come together: "musical stable pitches" and "harmonics." First a little background. To be clear, harmonics are not necessarily the same as overtones. A harmonic is an overtone which is an integer multiple of a ...


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Air! Which has to move. If the tube is struck, that in turn makes the air inside move - although the material the tube is made from may also vibrate. By blowing either into or across the tube, the air inside starts to move. This makes sound.


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It's a Sousaphone. Invented by one Philip Sousa, famed for his marches. He wrote many, which are still played, particularly in USA. He needed an instrument that would be capable of playing the lowest notes in marching bands, and came up with the serpentine bass you see. Many years ago, I had one, sadly sold it to a friend. It took hours to polish, but later ...


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I would say Saxophone is the easiest instrument I have learned but the hardest to get a good sound on. The fingerings are easier than clarinet and the embouchure is easier than flute. The fingerings on saxophone are very similar to recorder (and flute) so they are very easy. Just try to get lessons if you can to avoid any mistakes while learning. Also alto ...


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