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2

Is this a quality instrument? No leaks? (check the water key.) A brass instrument CAN have a 'bad note', though it's more common on valved instruments which have to be designed to be in tune. No such restriction on trombone where we have the choice of choosing the optimum slide position - different for every note if necessary! Is it the same using another ...


1

In a symphony orchestra almost every every player is able to fine-tune the pitch of notes while playing. The absolute exceptions are the piano (if used), harp, open notes on stringed instruments, and tuned percussion. The oboeist gets to maintain a stable note (A) for everyone else to tune to. String players tune open notes. Wind players including brass ...


2

Orchestral trombonists happily tune to A. We can refer it to the 1st position D, in much the same way that a violinist doesn't need to be given different notes for his other three strings! And we know where 2nd position A is on our slides. Also, our tuning slides aren't reset to zero when the instrument goes in the case. If it was in the right place for ...


2

In Brass bands the instruments are tuned by a given Bb => playing C or G (Eb instruments). In the orchestra I actually don’t know: The oboist can give them a Bb or F to tune their zero position or they will be able to take the Bb by ear a semitone higher than the given A. They can tune with the trumpets giving them an concert Bb


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The way I understand it, French horn is itself an alto instrument, or at least one that more often than not plays within the alto range. As evidence of this, consider the fact that, when composers write chords for the brass section to play, the horns are usually given notes between those played by the trumpets (soprano) and the trombones (tenor). Furthermore,...


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I'm a trumpet player, and I "just stop blowing" to end notes. When I try the "inhale to stop" approach, the initial results were that the pitch sagged right at the end; however, I believe I could eliminate that with practice. The other difference is that the "just stop blowing" ending is a bit "rounder" -- more tapered ...


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Consider a garden hose with a multi-sprayer attachment, where you can rotate the sprayer to provide different out flows (eg.: mist, jet, cone, etc.). If you use the "jet" setting, you'll get water jetting out of the hose. It's moving very fast, but (even ignoring splashes) you'll fill a bucket up faster if you use the "rinse" setting (or ...


1

faster air I have never heard! faster must concern the vibration of the lips which is built by the pressure of the air, the closing and the tension of the lips to produce higher tones. Lower tones need more air and looser lip pressure, less tension -> slower vibration.


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Because the aperture (the center of the embouchure, where the air column comes through) must be larger and the vibration created "wider" for lower notes, a larger volume of air is required per duration of time a low note is sounded, compared to higher pitches. For higher notes, because the aperture is smaller, the "same" volume of air as ...


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TLDR: Scroll to the end of the post. The source of the problem is that what trumpet players call "pedal tones" depend on how "pedal tones" are defined. Pedal tones on most brass instruments are usually defined as the fundamental pitch.... Trumpets are a slightly different animal, though. First, the design of the trumpet has an ...


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The wikipedia page which he linked in his answer describes false tones as follows: "The fundamental is chromatically discontinuous with the lowest 2nd harmonic reachable on a three-valve instrument ... [False tones] have a pitch between the normal range and the fundamental." So for example, a three-valve brass instrument in BBb (i.e. BBb Tuba) ...


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