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Background: I studied flute from when I was young and through conservatory. Played professionally as a freelance classical musician for a little while afterwards. With a little bit of distance I can say that much of what I was taught about breathing, and "lung capacity", etc. is nonsense. In fact I'm having trouble finding any credible information that ...


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I'm not sure where you're at in your woodwind "experience", but when I began playing clarinet and eventually flute, there were a couple things I did. Initially, when I had absolutely 0 breath control, I would lay on my back and place a text book or something with just a little bit of weight and just focus on controlling how I breathe in and out. If you're ...


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The most famous systematized breathing system is The Breathing Gym developed by the late Sam Pilafian and Pat Sheridan. A quick Internet search should give you plenty of sample exercises, some straight from this set and others adapted from it. In terms of exercises to "improve lung capacity," a common exercise is to breathe in (either measured, over eight ...


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First, a warning: the best way to improve breath control is by playing long-tones on the instrument. WIthout this, you don't hear the tone quality (or lack thereof) in relationship to breath control. The next-best exercise is to train yourself to breath "down to the diaphragm" at all times, regardless of what you're doing. This means making your upper ...


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