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10

You must have a vintage Martin 1T because the newer ones have a tie bar bridge and don't use bridge pins at all. From your question: I tried seeing if it actually was small enough to even fit into space between the side of the hole and the side of the pin. It couldn't - it seemed to hang up on the bottom edge of the hole. That is what it is supposed ...


10

They're not normal. Normal is each of the two screws is level, for each string, so the string sits happily centrally on its saddle. there's far more chance of the lower screw dropping, than the higher one screwing upwards. Use of a small Allen wrench will solve the problem, and while you're at it, maybe the strings in question could end up lower than they ...


10

Optimum bridge position is all tied up with the position of the sound post (which can be moved) and the bass bar (which can't). There's also the matter of getting used to playing a fiddle with non-standard dimensions, which may be counter-productive. A new bridge isn't expensive. Treat the violin to one, and a set of standard weight strings.


9

The difference is that the nylon strings on the classical are all close to the same diameter, whereas on the steel string the diameter of the smallest string might be about 20% of the size of the diameter of the largest. This matters because the physics you have learned is simplified. Only string that have no thickness and no stiffness exactly fit the model,...


7

"Floyd Rose Licensed" basically just means that the manufacturer has paid a licensing fee to the Floyd Rose company so as to not infringe upon Floyd Rose's patents. The trem could be made of stale chewing gum; as long as it is based upon the Floyd Rose design, it must be licensed. So, chances are, if you bought a dirt-cheap trem on eBay, it's going to ...


7

In my experience, having had 9 Floyd Rose / Kahler trem guitars over the last 30 years or so is that no, there is absolutely no point blocking the trem unless you really wanted a fixed bridge. Moving it can detune the guitar (although as you probably know, a locking nut really minimises this) and there are ways around this to keep it in tune with only minor ...


6

Generally, with a guitar in good condition, no. The only time I've detuned a guitar was when shipping one via air, where it might be in an unpressurized baggage compartment. I think the strings should be kept at pitch - but you should check and adjust them if they are getting sharp (which can happen with temperature and humidity changes.) If you play a ...


6

It shouldn't damage anything. However, it will make the strings slightly closer together and it may cause additional wear at the point the string goes over the saddle, since you are now causing a slight sideways angle. If you go through a few sets of strings and aren't breaking an unreasonable amount of strings because of it, you should be fine. A tiny ...


6

Unless you were tuning the strings well above the normal pitches for standard tuning (which you say you were not trying to do), this was caused by a defect with the guitar. Tuning a guitar up to standard pitch should not cause the bridge to come off. The defect may have been caused by previous attempts to tune the guitar strings too high, which causes ...


5

A possible cause, apart from a faulty gluing of the bridge, is that you were an octave too high. Seen it happen too often, using a tuner that tells you the target note, but for some reason, you've gone to an octave above. Thus 4x the tension. Also seen it happen after it's been left in a place too hot - rad., sun, conservatory, etc. Or, you may have the ...


5

As you can already see, the saddle is out of position (note the head of the saddle position screw is not against the bridge plate as it should be. You just need to find a replacement spring. You might find something that will work at a hardware store or at an online or brick and more music instrument retailer.


5

Okay, here's your answer from a luthier. Yes, if you change from .10 gauge to .12 gauge strings, assuming that all strings are thicker in this proportion, then there will be 44% more tension on the guitar for the same tuning (because tension is a square factor of diameter at the same pitch). It's a logical consequence that this means more wear and tear on ...


5

Normally you want the saddles level so the string sits directly in the center of the groove. Adjusting the screws isn't difficult, although you need the Allen wrench/Hex key that fits it. If you have lost or didn't receive one with the instrument you can purchase one on-line, or visit your local music store. Music stores will often have extras that they ...


4

If you want to fix the bridge, there are two simple ways: Replace it with a locking bridge - my Hohner G3T has one of these. It is only useful if you really need to use it as a fixed bridge guitar. Adjust the spring tension to make the bridge into a divebomb-only bridge. To do this, increase the spring tension until the bridge lies solidly along the surface ...


4

Its sounds like to me that you are trying to treat a dive only bridge like its floating by raising it abit... This will cause tuning problems as it wasn't designed for use like that, and the string tension will be wrong. You could continue like this and try but really its just not meant for that kind of tremolo action.


4

This should be repairable. Luckily the tension from ukulele strings is not that high, otherwise it would probably have snapped off altogether by now. You'll need a strong glue. I can't tell from your pictures whether it is the wood that has snapped, or the join between two pieces. If both halves are wood, a wood floor should be used, otherwise an epoxy, ...


4

I'm not sure if it's a manufacturing defect as much as a design flaw. This should not even be possible for a steel string acoustic. The ball ends should be held down by the bridge plate underneath the top, not the bridge itself. See this image: Where did you go wrong? I'm sorry to say it looks like you'll want to save up a little more for your next guitar ...


4

The bridge is the key point of connection between the strings and the body, but the tailpiece is an essential part of this. The main effect of upgrading this will be to change sustain and tone. You may also notice an improvement in tuning stability - if you are upgrading from a poor quality bridge/tailpiece. The actual effect varies a lot between an ...


4

In your photo, it appears that the saddles have a wedge-shaped top that is angled on one side only, while the other side is straight/flat. Three appear to be angled in one direction (reflecting the light) and three appear to be wedged in the opposite direction (not reflecting the light). If you reverse a saddle like this, you should be able to get some ...


4

The pin itself is held in the bridge by friction, but the pin holds the string by obstruction. The groove in the pin should be wide enough for the string and any knot which secures the string to its ball-end. Once installed, the ball-end is pulled right up to the underside of the body and cannot move further because the pin is in the way.


4

I'd be inclined to find a bit of plastic tubing - for aquarium use, or similar, that fits over the claws that hold the springs. Take springs off, add tubing, cut to length, replace springs. Ought to last a long time. Heat shrink would also do, but is much thinner.


4

I'd prefer to just comment on your question, but I still don't have enough rep... As others commented, it seems the string is stable in that position. But it really seems to be incorrectly installed - it seems the ring was supposed to be horizontally aligned with the bridge, instead of vertically as it looks in your picture. Take a look at this picture: ...


3

Perhaps I have missed this in the other replies but one obvious thing to check would be the gauge of strings you were using. It's not clear from your question whether you were tuning your current set of strings or you had changed to a new set, but obviously if you were to tune to standard E with a set of strings that were too heavy for how your guitar is ...


3

That is relatively rate for a Les Paul, as most have fixed bridges, but that is a Floyd Rose Licensed Tremolo. Edit (actually, on closer inspection, it is not a Floyd Rose but some other type) - a device to allow you to change the tension, and hence pitch, of all six strings at once. It is a logical development of the old Fender trem, and it can cope with a ...


3

I would not ever use a Mustang bridge as a replacement for either a Jaguar or Jazzmaster. They cause all kinds of intonation problems. I had one that came stock on my Troy Van Leeuwen signature Jazzmaster. What a headache. Honestly the absolute best replacement bridge for these type of guitars in a Mastery Bridge. It is absolutely the finest and most ...


3

Bridges with different vibrato systems will vary in terms of tuning stability, range of pitch variation, and response of the bar itself. Bridges also vary in terms of the range of set up they allow, and the ease with which adjustments can be made, strings can be changed, and so on. However the effect of the bridge on the timbre of the guitar is likely to be ...


3

If you have a classical guitar with a bridge like the one pictured below - you have to tie them a knot at the bridge. I found some tutorial explaining how to do it. Remove the old string (if you haven't already). Pass one end of the new string through the hole in the top of the bridge, in the direction away from the soundhole. Leave about 1-1/2 inches ...


3

topo morto is right in is comment, of course. That's why the bridge of a bass is nearer the edge of the back of the body (unless there is a much larger body), because the scale length of a bass is much larger than a guitar's. And that's why it's positioned more to the center in guitars (not because some habit coming from acoustical guitars); you could make ...


3

The premise stated in your question is quite valid. Whereas bridge placement is critical to the sound of an acoustic guitar, the electric guitar does not rely on vibration of the top (soundboard) to produce sound. Therefore you have more options for bridge placement with only ergonomics to take into account. If you keep the scale length (distance from nut ...


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