Hot answers tagged

12

The lower the fret action, the more buzz you will get. Your ideal height will be based on what you need. Unamplified, many of the really fast guitarists have fret buzz all over the neck. Personally, I use a reasonably high action on most of my guitars (about 3mm at 12th fret) because I dislike buzz and have quite a hard picking action. I do have two guitars ...


9

Before doing anything you can test it by putting a thin piece of paper or something similar between the E string and the nut to temporarily raise it slightly. If this eliminates the buzz then you can be pretty sure the problem is the nut slot has worn down. The superglue suggestion sounds like it could work.


8

Something else may be loose elsewhere on the guitar and that is its resonant frequency. Is it like a rattle? Strike a G and feel around the guitar. If you touch something and the buzz stops you have found the loose part. Try around the head stock, the strap buttons, the knobs, the 1/4 Jack, the little string holders on the head stock, the screws that hold on ...


7

Ahhh the old "it's your faulty playing technique" response from the guitar tech who did the set up. I've heard that one before too - but did not fall for it. You should not have to alter otherwise proper playing technique to get your guitar to play buzz free. Sometimes positioning of certain phrases you play will necessitate placing your finger farther ...


6

WIth that fingering, have you tried plucking the 5th string on the nut side of your fretted point? You will find that the vibrating string between the nut and 7th fret gives the same note you are plucking on the 3rd string. Normally the nut side of each string will resonate a little if damped (which is why for tapping passages, many musicians use a nut ...


6

Fret buzz isn't necessarily a sign of a poor setup, because some players want low action and can accept some fret buzz. A guitar tech should discuss this with a player before doing a setup. Having strings fret out when bending is more serious and I would expect a tech to make sure this isn't happening, unless a player said they don't do string bending and ...


6

While @RockinCowboy's points are all good, in reality you do need to play close to the fret - playing your finger in the middle between frets is not going to work. Your fingers should all be tight up against the back of the fret. If you ever try playing a scalloped fret guitar, you will see just how badly wrong it can go, but this holds true for all guitars....


5

Since the acoustic sounds fine it's not the amp. It's the single coil pickups on the strat picking up noise from the electrical system in your house. It's very common. The kinds of pickups used in acoustic guitars don't have this problem. Try moving to a different area of your house and/or turning off all lights and other electrical equipment.


5

If both guitars buzz with light strings but not with heavier strings, then there are a couple of options. I'm assuming the buzz is happening when the string touches a fret somewhere near the middle of its vibrating length; if the buzz is at the nut or bridge or somewhere else, then this line of thinking does not apply. You could switch to a heavier gauge, ...


5

You can use superglue to add material to the nut slot. Add a drip or two and wait for it to completely dry. I've also heard that you can mix baking soda with the superglue for extra hardness but I haven't tried that myself. It may need a little filing to get the right shape. You might also try raising the action slightly at the bridge. This would move the ...


5

Mainly, it's going to be string height and/or the angle at which the string vibrates. If you change string gauges, you will most definitely get string buzz. That's strictly based on the fact that a heavier gauge string (or set of strings) adds more tension on the whole construction of the guitar. To a certain extent, the neck of the guitar is flexible. The ...


5

Like in the video BUT cover the nearby fretboard with tape first! You don't want glue on the fretboard!


4

I had the same problem with my classical guitar: it buzzed whenever a G was played (open G-string or A and E-string when playing G as well). Turned out that this was caused by the end of the three metal strings (D, A, E) touched the back of the bridge! I pulled these ends away from the back of the bridge and the buzz disappeared. See photo:


4

The buzzing is due to the string rattling against one of the frets. You need to press down with your finger on the D string directly behind the fret. Your finger is too far from the fret so the string is rattling against it.


4

From personal experience as well as working with well respected engineers, guitar amps make noises. A lot of time this has to do with the type of amp and setup that you are going for. Sure, you can get a fairly clean sound out of certain amps/guitars but if you're playing a rock setup, your amp will be making some noise. This is only really an issue if ...


4

Most fret buzzing is a result of the vibrating string contacting another fret as it vibrates in an oscillating arc. There are several things that commonly cause this to happen. Neck does not have enough relief or has a back bow. The vibrating/oscillating string must clear all the frets between where it is fretted and the bridge. If the neck is ...


4

The strings buzz quite consistently but not enough to be heard through an amp Strings buzzing not only puts you off playing but it will prevent the string from resonating for as long and lower your tone quality. In my opinion nobody should create fret buzz when you ask them to lower your action. One thing you could try is a higher gauge string, but that ...


4

Check to make sure the frets arent popping up. If that isn't the issue, the groove that your high e rests in is to deep and you need to get the nut replaced (or shimmed and filed). I would take it to a different luthier this time.


4

You are describing resonance, which is one of the ways that violinists know a note is in tune. It is usually a good thing, in that the instrument is telling you that the note is in tune (!). Some common resonances in first-position: 1st finger on G-string playing A is in tune => A-string rings 1st finger on D-string playing E is in tune => E-string ...


4

Makes sense to take it back, since it appears quite new and it's already been tweaked. They can re-tweak it. It may well not be the truss rod that needs altering, but simply a height adjustment on whichever E string it could be... You should have had a tiny Allen (hex) key with the guitar just for this purpose - screw the two small Allen screws (either side ...


4

The nut is the problem, but it might not be the height of the slot but the shape of it. If you look closely you should be able to see if the string is touching the fret during vibration. If you are sure that it is not touching but you still hear something weird (more like a hizz than a buzz), it is gonna be the shape of the slot that is creating the ...


3

Fret buzz is not only not necessarily bad, but actually a part of the guitar tone. The guitar is partially a percussive instrument, and one percussive aspect of that (in addition to knocking or tapping on the body of an acoustic guitar or hollow-body electric) is the snap produced by string-on-fret action. Slap guitar technique in particular exploits this ...


3

This is the question you should be asking the electrician who re-wired the mains lead. It would have been a good idea to have the guitar and lead along with the amp., he could then test everything properly, and just maybe, the noise would have gone. And, yes, it's a good idea to own a socket tester. Mine goes to every gig, and may well have saved lives, let ...


3

First off, I don't play guitar, I play electric bass. As you mentioned, the string could be touching the fret. That is very likely. However, depending on the bridge that you have, the connector for the high E string could be wobbling, causing the buzzing sound. I'm guessing that because this only happens when the string is played open, that the string is ...


2

It is not normal for new strings. If your old strings didn't buzz, then your new strings may have lighter gauge and therefore the guitar fretboard is too flat. You may need to adjust the truss rod, replace the bridge saddle or get a new heavier gauge set of strings. By the way - do not wait for the strings to get rusty in order to change them. If at all ...


2

I'll expand a bit on my comment at the request of OP. I haven't had this exact problem on any of my fretless basses but I can tell you what steps I would take if I did encounter something like this. Since you said the buzzing is coming from the nut side of the note, it might be some sort of mechanical buzz either from the tuners on the headstock or the truss ...


2

@Kevin Johnsrude is correct, but I will add to his list here: It is possible for a guitar to have problems with buzzing that are not caused by the guitarist. The action may be too low. The frets may be too warn. The neck may be warped. Also placing your finger on the string is an art. The target area on your fingers that produces good tone is smaller than ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible