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12

The lower the fret action, the more buzz you will get. Your ideal height will be based on what you need. Unamplified, many of the really fast guitarists have fret buzz all over the neck. Personally, I use a reasonably high action on most of my guitars (about 3mm at 12th fret) because I dislike buzz and have quite a hard picking action. I do have two guitars ...


9

Usually this sort of hum or buzz is because of the resistor in the volume pot. When the volume is at 10, the resistor is not being used. This means that the pickup is essentially directly connected to the amp. There's no chance for 60 cycle hum to enter the signal except through bad cables, etc. When below 10 the resistor itself will pick up 60 cycle hum,...


7

Ahhh the old "it's your faulty playing technique" response from the guitar tech who did the set up. I've heard that one before too - but did not fall for it. You should not have to alter otherwise proper playing technique to get your guitar to play buzz free. Sometimes positioning of certain phrases you play will necessitate placing your finger farther ...


7

It could be one of these three things: The neck is bowing outward. It could be caused by the construction of the guitar, the tension of the strings or the dryness of where you're keeping the guitar. If it's a construction issue and the guitar is nice enough, you can get it repaired. If it's the humidity, there are little guitar humidifier sponges you can ...


6

WIth that fingering, have you tried plucking the 5th string on the nut side of your fretted point? You will find that the vibrating string between the nut and 7th fret gives the same note you are plucking on the 3rd string. Normally the nut side of each string will resonate a little if damped (which is why for tapping passages, many musicians use a nut ...


6

While @RockinCowboy's points are all good, in reality you do need to play close to the fret - playing your finger in the middle between frets is not going to work. Your fingers should all be tight up against the back of the fret. If you ever try playing a scalloped fret guitar, you will see just how badly wrong it can go, but this holds true for all guitars....


5

From personal experience as well as working with well respected engineers, guitar amps make noises. A lot of time this has to do with the type of amp and setup that you are going for. Sure, you can get a fairly clean sound out of certain amps/guitars but if you're playing a rock setup, your amp will be making some noise. This is only really an issue if ...


5

If both guitars buzz with light strings but not with heavier strings, then there are a couple of options. I'm assuming the buzz is happening when the string touches a fret somewhere near the middle of its vibrating length; if the buzz is at the nut or bridge or somewhere else, then this line of thinking does not apply. You could switch to a heavier gauge, ...


5

Since the acoustic sounds fine it's not the amp. It's the single coil pickups on the strat picking up noise from the electrical system in your house. It's very common. The kinds of pickups used in acoustic guitars don't have this problem. Try moving to a different area of your house and/or turning off all lights and other electrical equipment.


5

Fret buzz isn't necessarily a sign of a poor setup, because some players want low action and can accept some fret buzz. A guitar tech should discuss this with a player before doing a setup. Having strings fret out when bending is more serious and I would expect a tech to make sure this isn't happening, unless a player said they don't do string bending and ...


4

The buzzing is due to the string rattling against one of the frets. You need to press down with your finger on the D string directly behind the fret. Your finger is too far from the fret so the string is rattling against it.


4

A drop or something may damage the instrument, meaning something slips or falls out of place and fret buzz develops. As Dr Mayhem and Wheat Williams mention, heat/moisture content/new and different strings/slipping nuts/slipping saddles can all contribute to fret buzz. (Wheat has a great answer on the effects of car temperature fluctuations on an ...


4

Most fret buzzing is a result of the vibrating string contacting another fret as it vibrates in an oscillating arc. There are several things that commonly cause this to happen. Neck does not have enough relief or has a back bow. The vibrating/oscillating string must clear all the frets between where it is fretted and the bridge. If the neck is ...


3

I found this very helpful link: http://www.guitarnuts.com/wiring/shielding/shield3.php and I found out I had ground loops; removing them improved the issue a lot. There is much more shielding stuff to do in this link, requiring more material and time, so I definitely recommend it.


3

As others have said, this could be an issue with the neck of the guitar. With steel-string guitars, an issue like this might be fixable with a truss-rod adjustment, but classical guitars don't normally have truss rods, so you'd have to take it to a Luthier or guitar tech for a diagnosis and/or repair. However, here are a couple of areas to investigate ...


3

The strings buzz quite consistently but not enough to be heard through an amp Strings buzzing not only puts you off playing but it will prevent the string from resonating for as long and lower your tone quality. In my opinion nobody should create fret buzz when you ask them to lower your action. One thing you could try is a higher gauge string, but that ...


3

Fret buzz is not only not necessarily bad, but actually a part of the guitar tone. The guitar is partially a percussive instrument, and one percussive aspect of that (in addition to knocking or tapping on the body of an acoustic guitar or hollow-body electric) is the snap produced by string-on-fret action. Slap guitar technique in particular exploits this ...


3

This is the question you should be asking the electrician who re-wired the mains lead. It would have been a good idea to have the guitar and lead along with the amp., he could then test everything properly, and just maybe, the noise would have gone. And, yes, it's a good idea to own a socket tester. Mine goes to every gig, and may well have saved lives, let ...


3

You are describing resonance, which is one of the ways that violinists know a note is in tune. It is usually a good thing, in that the instrument is telling you that the note is in tune (!). Some common resonances in first-position: 1st finger on G-string playing A is in tune => A-string rings 1st finger on D-string playing E is in tune => E-string ...


2

It's possible that an object in the room is vibrating when certain strings are played. This has happened to me a couple of times; a metal picture frame on my wall was buzzing ever so slightly, but enough to be bothersome when I played the bass notes on my guitar. My classical is a lower end model with a laminated top that sounds quite bassy, whereas the ...


2

It is not normal for new strings. If your old strings didn't buzz, then your new strings may have lighter gauge and therefore the guitar fretboard is too flat. You may need to adjust the truss rod, replace the bridge saddle or get a new heavier gauge set of strings. By the way - do not wait for the strings to get rusty in order to change them. If at all ...


2

I'll expand a bit on my comment at the request of OP. I haven't had this exact problem on any of my fretless basses but I can tell you what steps I would take if I did encounter something like this. Since you said the buzzing is coming from the nut side of the note, it might be some sort of mechanical buzz either from the tuners on the headstock or the truss ...


2

I had the same problem with my classical guitar: it buzzed whenever a G was played (open G-string or A and E-string when playing G as well). Turned out that this was caused by the end of the three metal strings (D, A, E) touched the back of the bridge! I pulled these ends away from the back of the bridge and the buzz disappeared. See photo:


2

A string buzzing may be one of a few things: Inconsistent fret height - the metal frets on the fretboard are height-adjustable, albeit not easily. A fret can be raised by simply levering it out of its slot (carefully), while it can be lowered by grinding it. Less expensive guitars generally have less attention paid to the fretwork. This is going to cost you ...


2

@Kevin Johnsrude is correct, but I will add to his list here: It is possible for a guitar to have problems with buzzing that are not caused by the guitarist. The action may be too low. The frets may be too warn. The neck may be warped. Also placing your finger on the string is an art. The target area on your fingers that produces good tone is smaller than ...


2

If you're getting buzz only at certain frets and on certain strings then the problem is probably that your frets aren't level. This can happen because of fret wear, because the frets weren't properly leveled when the guitar was made, or because the neck has changed shape slightly over time. You can diagnose the problem by using a short straightedge that ...


2

It's the guitar. Check whether it buzzes on all frets or only part of them. While you're at it, check the other strings as well at frets you don't usually play. Here you can find a table qualifying the buzzing problems by type.


2

Check to make sure the frets arent popping up. If that isn't the issue, the groove that your high e rests in is to deep and you need to get the nut replaced (or shimmed and filed). I would take it to a different luthier this time.


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