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8

You've correctly analysed why the cable impedance does not matter in the way it does for HF transmission lines. (Though, the assumption of vacuum light speed is actually not completely valid – the dielectric factors into this, but it doesn't change the fact that the wavelengths are many times longer than any guitar cable.) That notwithstanding though, the ...


7

There are some aspects of a cable's design that do affect audio quality. When connected to the output of a passive electric guitar, a low capacitance cable will cause less high-frequency roll off per unit length of cable. That doesn't mean that the high-capacitance cable will necessarily sound worse - in some cases, it might be preferred - but it is a ...


5

No, for a small studio, other than the cost difference, you can use TRS in the place of TS cables. When you start looking at cable runs over around six meters (20 feet) you can start seeing some issues with resistance, depending on what you are using the wire for. The dual wire TRS cable will sometimes have a smaller gauge wire than the coaxial cable that ...


5

The things that affect the quality and price of a cable are similar to what affects quality and price for any product: parts and labor. Specifically for cables: The cable itself, including the type of metal used as conductors, the quality of the metal, the dialectic type and quality, and the insulator type and quality. Also the strand count and size of the ...


4

XLR to TS is the correct cable. This connects the XLR pin 3 to ground, thereby effectively transforming the console's XLR out to an unbalanced output. If you use a XLR to TRS cable, chances are the ring will just be left at floating level, which means the tip will have an extremely high impedance. You will probably still get some audible sound, but nothing ...


4

You might even get a signal through with just a single-core cable, no screen, where a cable connects two items of mains-powered equipment (and are in a country civilised enough to provide an earth connection on all power outlets.) Like a telegraph system - there was only one wire, the return was the Earth. But we often use single-core plus shield. The ...


4

From the manual for your monitors: A balanced XLR connector and unbalanced RCA jack allow connection to professional mixers and I/O boxes using +4 dBu or -10 dBV nominal operating levels While the wording is odd, those level figures are the different standards in “professional” vs. “consumer” line level connections. The "pro" standard is about 12 dB ...


4

You're trying to combine "parallel DC power supplies." It's not as simple as Lego, though, because typically one supply is a few millivolts higher than another, which drives the second one in reverse. If you're lucky, nothing catches on fire besides that power supply which, to its astonishment, has become a power drain. With a few diodes rated for that ...


4

Definitely make one yourself or have someone make it for you. Some additional considerations: Maybe obvious: If you have an old patch/instrument cord with only one good end, you can cut off and discard the bad end. You have just saved yourself the trouble of soldering the male end. Strip the cut end to solder to a female connector Instead of making it as ...


3

My suggestions here, slightly shortened discussion. Electrical pianos sound a lot better in stereo than in mono in my experience. So, when possible try to record both left and right signal. More about that later. The piano has aux out-s that are perfect for recording. And you possibly have a sound input on your computer. This is wastly better than using ...


3

I used Aux cable, and keyboard port name is Aux In This is the problem! :) As you will see from page 30 of the manual here, the Aux in port is when you want to play a song out of the Yamaha PSR E353's speakers: If you want the sound to come out of the Yamaha, you need to use the PHONES/OUTPUT jack. Again from the manual: So you need to connect the ...


3

A two channel power amp (such as one used for stereo amplification or mono bi-amping) is two power amps in one box. Each power amp will have its own output with two connectors, one positive and one negative. On an amp with five-way lugs, banana plugs or similar outputs, it may look something like this: [+] [-] [-] [+] A single four-pole SpeakOn cable ...


3

If the two cables are electrically equivalent and neither is actually faulty, I suspect you're kidding yourself that the expensive one sounded better (a common delusion in the hi-fi world :-) Use the [L/L+R] Aux Out jack on the back of your piano into the L input of the Roland quad-capture. There's a Hi-Z switch on the back of the Roland. Make sure it's ...


3

Standard screened jack-to-jack cables. No need for anything fancy. Just the very first run, from guitar to Kemper, deserves care. The low level into high impedence of a guitar signal can be sensitive to cable capacitance. Which is a lousy bit of electrical design, but we're stuck with it.


3

Are there different standards for XLR cabling? Yes. The XLR connectors has been used for a lot of different things. They were invented around 1950. In audio today it is mostly standardized, but vintage equipment may use the XLR connector in various ways. It was quite commonly used for connecting loudspeakers to power amplifiers. Today it is almost ...


3

Find a piece of plastic tubing, cut it longitudinally,if needed, and put it over the cable coming out of the plug, About 25mm will do. The plugs are better for pedals if they're right-angled. Also, you can't pull them out by the wire, a favourite trick guitarists seem to have.


3

Practically, the 250mA output will probably be just fine. Try. It's a pretty poor power supply that can't cope with a nominal 12% overload.


3

Well, the critical question is about the inputs on that... thing, the FM transmitter. They're obviously not conforming to any professional audio standards. I would guess the audio and mic inputs correspond basically to the line in and mic in on a PC sound card. In which case the biggest difference is the gain, and possibly also the impedance. You almost ...


3

Get one made up, or get the soldering iron out yourself. I have to say, that's got to be one of the most awkward-looking jack sockets to try do anything non-standard with, but you've the choice of it being as short as you can get the cable whilst still being able to unscrew the barrel to reach the solder points… eg… …or long enough you could drop it round ...


2

I have a suggestion for a potentially easier way to solve your dilemma and accomplish your goal. It's probably less expensive as well. Perhaps you have already explored this solution and found it lacking = but I will post the information just in case you or a future reader of your question might benefit from it. Why not order the fully assembled patch ...


2

Screened cable comes in various sizes. But it doesn't HAVE to fill the exit hole. The strain is taken at the clamp inside the plug. Not that there should BE much strain between items on a pedalboard. Maybe you chose unnecessarily robust plugs.


2

On most ordinary amps, the inputs are simple 2 pole jack sockets, as in TS. If the socket is capable of connecting a stereo jack, it's usually marked as such. The sleeve is connected via the shielding wire around the outside of co-axial cable - like a guitar or mic. lead, to pin no.1 on the XLR/cannon. Worst case scenario is that you have a 50:50 chance ...


2

The main criterion for choosing your cable is length. It should have sufficient of this to reach the speakers in their new location. If they don't, it's a showstopper. Apart from that, don't fuss. If you use an extra plug/socket stage, turn the plugs occasionally to make sure corrosion isn't adding resistance. Once a year should be fine.


2

Cables differ in build, shielding quality, resistance, impedance and its constancy (admittedly, not particularly relevant for audio frequency cables at customary lengths), bendability and its effect on the cable parameters and some others. The copper inside can have different qualities. The most audible differences may be caused by instrument cables for ...


2

It depends on what type of wire you are using. If you run your signal and neutral (ground) through two separate wires, then it is a good idea to also have a shield around them that is connected to ground. Often the wire comes in "twisted pair" to also help with noise reduction. You may also use Coaxial cable for a guitar cable. In this case the second ...


2

One "typically TS application" that would definitely present an issue is the connection between a guitar with active electronics and an effects unit (stompbox). The output of the guitar and the input of the stompbox almost always have a TRS jack that is used to power the device on: One battery terminal (usually negative) is connected to the Ring ...


2

You can just plug XLR to XLR in pretty much all situations but you should be careful about levels. XLR outputs on powered devices are usually line level, while XLR inputs are often (especially on a mixer) mic level or switchable between mic and line level. You should switch the inputs to line level, if possible, and start with the output level as low as ...


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