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8

I used to play the cajon a lot with brushes, this way I could get a hi-hat, kick and snare sound. When hitting the snare and kick sounds while holding brushes you have to hit with the stick part of the brush to get a fuller sound especially when playing without mic. And the hi-hat sound comes natural from the brushes hitting the box. Without brushes I find ...


4

In the case of Meinl,the short answer is that 'lava' refers to a colour and not a timber. The timber is most probably what Meinl calls 'siam oak', which is rubber wood. If you go through the Meinl site, you will see terms like 'desert burl' and notice that the timber is , once again, 'siam oak'.


3

I certainly admire your resourcefulness and commend you on your willingness to attempt to build your own Cajon. I don't have the patience to attempt such a project myself. You want the playing surface (known as the tapa) to be as thin as possible so that it will vibrate and resonate! A playing surface that is too thick will be less responsive and sound ...


2

Just following up here. I bought a cajon pedal from my local drum shop for $160 with their promise that I could return it within two weeks if it didn't work out. Well, it didn't work out. There were two issues: first, the height at the heel was uncomfortably high, and it was a lot of work from a sitting position (it might work from a standing position); and ...


2

I don't own a Cajón (even if I plan to buy one) but I'll try to answer your question. A box made of wood A Cajón is a box made of wood (most of them). Anything that can alter the wood can alter the sound. The particularity of a Cajón is the front piece of wood which is thinner than the other sides, which allows elasticity and resonance. The front ...


2

You've nailed down the two features a cajon has - snare and kick. Those are what the cajon is built for, and out of the box (...) it's not going to do anything else specifically. Of course, feel free to experiment on them by tapping edges, using brushes etc to get different sounds, but they are built to do a kick and snare. You're not going to get crash or ...


2

Last time I saw a cajon live the player brought his own Shure Beta 91A.. It's a flat box-shaped kick mic that fits perfectly inside a cajon, it sounded great but it's not the cheapest option. It probably helped that he stressed to the soundie that he wanted the bass frequencies exaggerated. I have a cajon at home and when I record it I use my beta 56a right ...


2

Excuse me, I did not pay attention to this detail, here is my reformulated answer. You could buy a cajon with any wood, all would fulfill their role in your case. But there are differences, I'm not just talking about sound quality. I see all aspects, manufacture, use, aesthetics, sound, durability, weight, etc ... The MDS fulfills its role perfectly for ...


1

I build Cahons from scratch as a hobby.. You don't say what is wrong with the sound from your Cahon, but here are some tips; On the model you have, there are two screws - top left, and top right of the cahon. Remove those (there are enough left). That will loosen the corners of the tapa, and you'll get a sharper snap when you hit the cahon in that position....


1

It should not be a problem. There are such thing as "Cajon pedals" which are not as powerful as regular bass drum pedals. You could also use a softer beater such as wire or leather that will still produce a nice bass zound without weakening the face cover


1

I've always used a Sure Sm57 with the tip of the mic just inside the sound hole. It doesn't cause feedback and picks up the nuances pretty well. I also play with brushes on some songs and it picks that up too. The mic is then put straight through the PA and sounds great. I'm thinking of trying a Bass amp to have more control over my sound levels as often I ...


1

I built a cajon prototype for which I tried 4mm tapa and it was too thick to resonate well. The switch to 3mm improved the sound quite a bit, though I'd probably prefer even thinner tapa. If thin plywood is hard to get you could try using some other material for tapa, for example, a thin plastic sheet (I'd try 2mm polyethylene first, but that's not ...


1

I have been working the cajon for the past 10 years or so on gigs from jazz to flamenco. The use of the Vater Blue Brushes are very effective in creative performance. Add the foot Afrushe-cabasa on one free foot, a bass foot pedal on the other and hand held castanets for Kata Palo Ceco patterns on the cajon's rim and see what happens.


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