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34

I would strongly advise you NOT to buy any instruments. You don't need to. Do you imagine composers play lots of instruments? They don't. The only instrument Berlioz played was a guitar - tolerably - yet he wrote a book on orchestration! What possible use would it have been to Ravel if he had learnt to play the harp?!! If you buy a violin you'll end up ...


16

Jazz cello is absolutely possible. Here are resources to get you started in your project. Note that most if not all of these come with contact information. You should not be shy about contacting musicians or organizations to ask questions or even to request interviews. History of cello in jazz http://prjazz.org/history-of-cello-in-jazz.html An introduction ...


11

It does apply to any instrument, but for cello it's perhaps most notable because we so often play with instruments that have E-strings: violins, or else guitars. If you tune a cello in Pythagorean fifths down from an A-reference, and then a violinist tunes her e-string up a fifth from that, what you end up is a Pythagorean major third (plus three octaves) ...


8

He explains this right at the start of the book (First Edition, from IMSLP). Tirez = pull, Poussez = push. In other words, ^ is a different notation for a down bow.


6

I believe that the instrument you are best served by getting is a professional notation program with good orchestral sounds. The two that I personally have experience of is Dorico and Sibelius. The notation program will allow you, to a certain externt, hear the instruments and orchestration. Next, get a lot of musician friends. Preferrably musicians that ...


5

The only string teaching that remains, as far as I know, is online. I know quite a few violin teachers who were teaching online before and who are continuing but a lot of regular face-to-face teachers have installed Zoom are offering their former face-to-face students online tuition. If you are keen to continue with tuition I would suggest you make ...


5

I've both played and written a lot of advanced solo string music, and, while it varies from composer to composer (and editor to editor), bow markings are not at all uncommon. I just grabbed two scores off my music stand—Britten's Three Suites for Cello and Hindemith's Sonate for solo cello—and the former is covered with markings while the latter ...


5

I strongly recommend renting if you can't afford even a beater bass. Even if you do tune a cello in 4ths, the resonances will be different. And more important, the bow hand positions and pressure/speed behavior when playing on bass strings, on a bass, are radically different from a cello. It's not like switching from a half-size to full-size cello, where ...


5

Historically there have been some jazz bassists who have also played cello and tuned it in 4ths, I recall Oscar Pettiford was one of them. He even recorded it a few times. As @Old_Brixtonian mentioned the scale length is VERY different. The scale length of a 4/4 cello (27.375”) is shorter than even that of a short scale electric bass (30”) and a 3/4 upright ...


3

It can be worse on the guitar. I had a very good guitar player in one of my bands who asked me (I was also a math professor) why tuning his guitar exactly by ear for each string would fail; he had very good pitch discrimination and could hear the problems. What he was doing was tuning fourths perfectly with a 4/3 ratio (by ear); then tuning the third to 5/4 ...


3

I think that Jazz, more than any other genre, supports non-standard instrumentation. There is a horn-centric tendency, but I've definitely heard music with minimal horn and maximal swing. On the strings side, I can name more violinists — Stephane Grappelli, Jesn-Luc Pointy, Regina Carter, Stuff Smith — but I'm sure there are some great players in cello, ...


3

Since you mention you're new to the cello, I suspect this is largely a case of inexperience with bowing. I bet you will not hear it if you pluck the G-string. I have played several different cellos of different quality, and while a topnotch instrument is less likely to show this problem, the G-string is more prone to this sort of "shatter" behavior until ...


3

Some of Ernst Reijseger's music is jazz, some is less classifiable.


3

Here's a band I don't think anyone's mentioned: Turtle Island Quartet - Moment's Notice (John Coltrane) Here's a solo by their cellist: (Julie-O by Mark Summer Cellist from Turtle Island String Quartet) Not my kind of music but relevant I think.


2

A French horn and a double bass - that's the answer. But it's a moot point, because the presupposition of the question is wrong. No one in the history of music became a musician, or a "better musician" by "acquiring an instrument". (since this answer got got both upvoted and downvoted, let me justify the selection: these two are ...


2

for a less US-centric approach, check Vincent courtois and Valentin Ceccaldi's works https://www.deezer.com/fr/artist/7252282 https://www.deezer.com/fr/artist/68894 or the (quite famous) bumcello duo https://www.deezer.com/fr/artist/4027 also check this great interview of Vincent Courtois: https://www.jazzhalo.be/interviews/vincent-courtois-interview-with-...


2

Also Ron Carter played cello sometimes, for example on Mal Waldron's record "The Quest".


2

There’s no technical reason why a cello couldn’t play jazz, and I can imagine it working very well with the right cellist. However like @Dave Jacoby I can’t personally name any jazz cellists, but it’s not my area. (I wouldn’t be at all surprised to find Yo Yo Ma has given it a good go on some project or other)


2

Performing classical music is difficult. Many performers are nervous and anxious and their breathing can become shallow fast and noisy. I doubt that any string player would breathe heavily for effect. As an ex- professional l know that any player can be struck by bouts of heavy breathing, especially in situations where their careers are on the line. Flight ...


1

Piano. It has all notes, in spite of not being able to produce Legato and Tremolo perfectly.


1

I believe you should satisfy your curiosity, but you might stop short of purchasing the instruments. Perhaps you could borrow or rent a larger variety, so that you have some familiarity, and then as composers do (and @OldBrixtonian wrote), you can consult with genuine experts on those instruments when necessary. Having some direct knowledge of strings, winds,...


1

I'm actually also a cello student in twelfth grade! Unfamiliar with any grading systems, though, bc my teacher doesn't use them (to that end your friend is probably not that far off??). Best I can say is, a good teacher is the only one with the expertise to guide you through not only what you can do with your instrument, but what you can do as a musician as ...


1

There are two main reasons for bowing in a particular way: Dynamics. It is easier to play loudly at the frog and to play softly at the tip. Bow distribution. Hooking (consecutive up bows or down bows) may be better for getting your bow to where you want it to be. Players who are still learning can benefit greatly from helpful markings like this. Once a ...


1

Here is a great web page that has the ranges of almost all orchestral instruments: http://www.orchestralibrary.com/reftables/rang.html


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