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8 votes
Accepted

Why does a harmonic still sound even though you lift your finger?

I'll attempt some clumsy ms-paint illustrations. When you play the string, it vibrates: When you put your finger on the string as normal to stop it, only the part between your finger and the bridge ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 17.9k
6 votes

I know these are sixteenth sextuplets, but I was wondering what these are called when they share the same staff? And how they're played?

You're right that the vertically aligned notes are meant to be played at the same time, but if this is an ensemble piece, the part is almost certainly intended to be played divisi (divided), where ...
the-baby-is-you's user avatar
4 votes

Why does a harmonic still sound even though you lift your finger?

Why should we expect it to stop ringing? A natural harmonic is a mode of vibration of the string. Just like vibration in the fundamental mode and every other mode, the string will continue vibrating ...
Edward's user avatar
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2 votes

Will playing my cello over a track recording of other parts sound good enough for a performance?

Soloing over a backing track is a perfectly normal and legitimate approach. It's also a pretty big undertaking in terms of preparation time. The most difficult part of the whole project is going to ...
Tom Williams's user avatar
2 votes

Long horizontal line between notes

Some of my violin etudes have that sign, and it usually means that you should keep your finger on the string for the duration of the line. Usually, it's meant to train the left hand frame to minimize ...
user96329's user avatar
2 votes

I know these are sixteenth sextuplets, but I was wondering what these are called when they share the same staff? And how they're played?

As I suppose is clear by now the question isn't so much about the sixteenth sextuplets but about the two voices happening simultaneously. As you say, you know that they are sixteenth sextuplets. In ...
phoog's user avatar
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1 vote

Why does a harmonic still sound even though you lift your finger?

Once the string (be it violin, cello, guitar, whatever) is touched on a node, the string will not vibrate at that point. So a harmonic is produced. Take the finger away, leave it there, it makes no ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 194k

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