11

Some ideas which may help her play and practice: If she's not a larger than average ten-year-old, then I hope she has a smaller than normal guitar. If not, then a smaller size guitar may make it easier for her to learn and play. Electric guitars are usually strung with lighter strings and are easier to get started on, as long as she likes the sound. Let her ...


10

Unlikely, because unless your child has a genetic reason for being unable to distinguish pitches (which you apparently may, if what you say is true), he or she will soon learn to identify the inaccuracies in your singing. For example, there has been some noise about bilingual families and a fear that the non-native parent will "infect" the child with bad ...


9

All of the above. And if none work out, there's always the voice. I wouldn't say that a great singer is less musical, and less musically valuable, than any instrumentalist.


8

I have to say that a household and environment that fosters a love of music will have a large impact on your daughters interest. Likely only piano lessons with an instructor will assess her interest in that particular instrument, but that's really just the tip of the iceberg. There are lots of other instruments, most just as fulfilling, as well as singing (...


7

You should pay attention to your singing. Tone-deafness is a result of a disconnection between what are you hear and what you produce. It is generally fixable through conscious attention. I work developing musical training computer games for children. My mother sang to me as a child, and she is tone-deaf. I also learned to sing in a tone deaf manner. We ...


7

As much as it bothers you, he's actually naturally doing exactly what he should be doing. I'll explain in a moment. Changing voices for boys who sing is primarily difficult for two reasons: the physiological aspect and the psychological aspect. Because many books are written on this subject, I will very briefly address each citing information from a text ...


7

In my experience of leading amateur kids choirs, the comfortable range for most 4-8 year olds would be around middle C (or possibly as low as the B flat just below that) up to around D or E -- that is, just over an octave. Many kids would struggle with a low A or a high F, I think.


7

I think with younger children (below 13 or 14ish) it's important to keep clear and simple goals and discuss the goals openly with the student. Good small goals appropriate for a lesson are IMO things like: Learn one new rhythm pattern Learn one new chord Learn one new song (using known chords and patterns) Make that difficult chord easier to transition into/...


6

There are hundreds of different types of breathing exercises, so I will mention a few and suggest important concepts to cover. 1.) Teach them how to visualize their breathing. This one is extremely important and is the root of good breathing. I always teach my students to think of taking big, large, open, relaxed, deep breaths. 2.) They should be silent. ...


6

It is a whirly tube, corrugaphone, lasso d'amore or bloogle resonator. To be honest, I was not expecting my search for "whirly music tube" to come straight back like that :o) If you Google "buy whirly tube" you'll get a fair few hits. I'm not going to link them as I have no idea how good any of the sites are. In my opinion, "Bloogle Resonator" should be ...


5

Hearing (or even listening to !) a rookie drummer practising is not easy. From a parent's point of view there has to be dedication to put up with the noise. Provision of a suitable place to practise, where there is enough room for a kit, and neighbours don't get upset, isn't easy. Have a big detached house, or money to provide a rehearsal room. Have a ...


5

I bought my son a 3/4 scale guitar with nylon strings when he was 5 or 6. That gave him enough interest to start learning, then I let him use one of my cheap full scale acoustics with steel strings at age 8 as his hands were big enough. Currently he has taken up bass, so he is learning on a 5 string that my bass player had spare. It is a challenge as he is ...


5

I disliked piano (particularly lessons) until grade 11. Something just changed and now I love it. Some kids will enjoy it right away, but most of the time I hear stories like mine. I was a disciplined kid but most generally aren't, and practising is a drag. A lack of interest may not be a good indicator that you should stop the lessons -- so many people ...


5

My experience as a teacher of violin is that the ability to recognize pitch differences is not important when considering one's aptitude for playing violin. Training the ear is as much a skill as learning to physically play the instrument and will improve with time and work. A child's ability to distinguish between pitches is being trained even from inside ...


4

I think it may not be the best vantage to try and "assess" the amount of interest. Look at it this way. Your child's interest in music is not set in stone. It's a living part of her, and if nurtured it can grow. A bad instructor can bunk her desire to ever touch the instrument. But your own interest and involvement in her lessons are primary. So don't "send"...


4

This isn't a great answer if you just want your kids to make music, but if you want to use music making as a vehicle to teach the kids how to program then I'd take a look at Sonic Pi. The founder of that effort is Sam Aaron the guy behind Overtone, a Clojure dialect that overlays SuperCollider and turns it into an elegant live coding environment. The people ...


4

It may be, genetically, that your child has inherited your amusicality. You won't know for a while. In fact, if only you listen to it, then you'll never know! Children tend to believe that their parents are inscrutable, so your out of tune singing may be acceptable as the right way to your child. This will then oppose renditions by others, giving a bit of a ...


4

I think it is wonderful that your child is showing an interest in playing an instrument and making music. You should certainly encourage that desire in any way possible. There are many very good quality smaller size guitars that might be a good fit for a six year old. In order to increase the chances that your child will actually find the experience ...


4

I can't really talk much about any formal guidelines or so, because I don't have much experience regarding those, nevermind that they can be very different depending where you are. Personally, however, I wouldn't put too much emphasis on such a test. Precise hearing is something you need to learn and develop, not something innate you either have or have not....


4

If you've got a copy of Sibelius (I know that's a big if), there's an inbuilt function to colour pitches. In Sibelius 8, it's under Note Input > Plugins > Color Pitches. In older versions, it'll be in the plugins somewhere. You can select a colour for each pitch, and the plugin applies them to the music you select. Results look something like this:


4

In the long run, brass instruments require only one hand, for the most part. There are also several manufacturers who make one-handed versions of woodwind instruments, though these are quite expensive. But it's very hard for a four-year-old to start on these instruments. I would recommend piano. It has been shown to be an effective means of physical therapy ...


4

TRDR: Singing, from personal experience. Since birth, my right side has been paralyzed, though not as badly as your sister. I have had singing lessons for years, and I still find them very enjoyable. I have never felt like I was hindered at singing. Another reason to choose singing is that the technical part is easy, especially at the beginning. A ...


4

I expect that eventually he'll want to take lessons from a real teacher, but I can recommend some things you might be able to show him that will help him be able to play lots of simple songs quite easily. I started my son out by showing him the primary chords for the key of C, three chords in open position, C, F, & G. Then we worked up a song using ...


3

Consider a ukulele. "Real" ukuleles are available cheaply (although you can spend a lot on a really lovely one). It suits small hands. It has nylon strings so it's not too difficult to fret. There are plenty of resources for learning real songs to play on the uke. Having fewer strings makes for easier chord shapes. It's a great instrument on which a child ...


3

I started playing guitar at about 7 years old, I got a classical guitar, slightly smaller than the common size -but very slightly (I think it was larger that the '3/4 size', I actually played until I was 20!). The important thing for a child, I'd say, is that the guitar is confortable to play: rather low action and normal-to-low tension strings. Nylon, of ...


3

In terms getting the notes to ring, I hope she is using an electric guitar that is an appropriate size for her. In terms of playing in time, I hope she is playing with a drum track, not a metronome. In terms of teaching, I would first teach her power chords and the first blues (pentatonic minor) scale and then teach her how to approximate the songs she ...


3

If your daughter has to practise on it, the ideal would be to have an accoustic piano. Then, if you want to use it for electronic music maybe you can have a look at pianos with "silent" mechanism. I know Yamaha makes them; I don't know about other brands, but probably they do also. They are normal accoustic pianos that incorporate a mechanism that, when ...


3

Just speculative idea.... Music instruments are slowly becoming electronic, and some sound very good. And there are numerous newer type of electronic instruments that are perfectly suitable for and designed for one hand play. See for example Roli blocks.


3

6 is pretty young to try and self learn from online videos, though not impossible I suppose. I do teach kids, but in groups. The youngest private student I've had was 13 when he started and stuck with me for 3 years until a move separated us (this was in the 80s so no skype). There are great kids books for learning guitar from Mel Bay and Hal Leonard, etc....


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