17

The first thing to note is that learning to play a musical instrument should be a pleasure not a punishment. There is nothing to be gained and much to be lost by forcing her to play / practice. The second thing to note is that while practicing more does generally lead to faster improvement quality practice is more important. One hour spent doing more or less ...


16

I can see that there are already several answers and one of them has got a lot of votes. So I come in a bit late, but I would like to pay attention to some aspects. Since your child is now 7 years old and has been playing for two years she started at age 5. That is the kind of age where parents usually need to be quite active in the practicing. This is ...


12

My son is learning an instrument. So is my partner. I don't play the same instruments, but I have many years of experience as a musician and have done some informal teaching. So I can recognize every missed note and every timing issue, and I can generally spot problems with technique related to posture. You said that your daughter gets frustrated with you ...


11

Some ideas which may help her play and practice: If she's not a larger than average ten-year-old, then I hope she has a smaller than normal guitar. If not, then a smaller size guitar may make it easier for her to learn and play. Electric guitars are usually strung with lighter strings and are easier to get started on, as long as she likes the sound. Let her ...


10

Unlikely, because unless your child has a genetic reason for being unable to distinguish pitches (which you apparently may, if what you say is true), he or she will soon learn to identify the inaccuracies in your singing. For example, there has been some noise about bilingual families and a fear that the non-native parent will "infect" the child with bad ...


9

All of the above. And if none work out, there's always the voice. I wouldn't say that a great singer is less musical, and less musically valuable, than any instrumentalist.


8

There is amazing advice here so I'll keep this very short. I've played all my life. Her frustration should elicit only one thing from you, sympathy that it's tough and encouragement to continue. For instance, "I agree honey you've been working on that piece forever and it's a tough one but it just keeps getting better so don't stop. How about you play ...


7

As much as it bothers you, he's actually naturally doing exactly what he should be doing. I'll explain in a moment. Changing voices for boys who sing is primarily difficult for two reasons: the physiological aspect and the psychological aspect. Because many books are written on this subject, I will very briefly address each citing information from a text ...


7

You should pay attention to your singing. Tone-deafness is a result of a disconnection between what are you hear and what you produce. It is generally fixable through conscious attention. I work developing musical training computer games for children. My mother sang to me as a child, and she is tone-deaf. I also learned to sing in a tone deaf manner. We ...


7

I think with younger children (below 13 or 14ish) it's important to keep clear and simple goals and discuss the goals openly with the student. Good small goals appropriate for a lesson are IMO things like: Learn one new rhythm pattern Learn one new chord Learn one new song (using known chords and patterns) Make that difficult chord easier to transition into/...


7

Perhaps her teacher can provide the essential information you need. It appears that so far, you are not aware of what factors your daughter needs to be able to learn. There are many factors to learning, which most people are unaware of. A good teacher should be capable of ascertaining what those are. They may well be different from what you consider. The ...


6

There are hundreds of different types of breathing exercises, so I will mention a few and suggest important concepts to cover. 1.) Teach them how to visualize their breathing. This one is extremely important and is the root of good breathing. I always teach my students to think of taking big, large, open, relaxed, deep breaths. 2.) They should be silent. ...


6

It is a whirly tube, corrugaphone, lasso d'amore or bloogle resonator. To be honest, I was not expecting my search for "whirly music tube" to come straight back like that :o) If you Google "buy whirly tube" you'll get a fair few hits. I'm not going to link them as I have no idea how good any of the sites are. In my opinion, "Bloogle Resonator" should be ...


5

I think it is wonderful that your child is showing an interest in playing an instrument and making music. You should certainly encourage that desire in any way possible. There are many very good quality smaller size guitars that might be a good fit for a six year old. In order to increase the chances that your child will actually find the experience ...


5

Hearing (or even listening to !) a rookie drummer practising is not easy. From a parent's point of view there has to be dedication to put up with the noise. Provision of a suitable place to practise, where there is enough room for a kit, and neighbours don't get upset, isn't easy. Have a big detached house, or money to provide a rehearsal room. Have a ...


5

My experience as a teacher of violin is that the ability to recognize pitch differences is not important when considering one's aptitude for playing violin. Training the ear is as much a skill as learning to physically play the instrument and will improve with time and work. A child's ability to distinguish between pitches is being trained even from inside ...


5

Is your husband's name Leopold by any chance? Joking aside, I would have a look at Alma Deutscher and the approach her parents took regarding her musical education. The girl followed an interesting path, with excellent teachers to guide her, and is now (at 15) a world-class composer and (not unimportantly) a stellar improviser. ...


4

It may be, genetically, that your child has inherited your amusicality. You won't know for a while. In fact, if only you listen to it, then you'll never know! Children tend to believe that their parents are inscrutable, so your out of tune singing may be acceptable as the right way to your child. This will then oppose renditions by others, giving a bit of a ...


4

This isn't a great answer if you just want your kids to make music, but if you want to use music making as a vehicle to teach the kids how to program then I'd take a look at Sonic Pi. The founder of that effort is Sam Aaron the guy behind Overtone, a Clojure dialect that overlays SuperCollider and turns it into an elegant live coding environment. The people ...


4

I can't really talk much about any formal guidelines or so, because I don't have much experience regarding those, nevermind that they can be very different depending where you are. Personally, however, I wouldn't put too much emphasis on such a test. Precise hearing is something you need to learn and develop, not something innate you either have or have not....


4

If you've got a copy of Sibelius (I know that's a big if), there's an inbuilt function to colour pitches. In Sibelius 8, it's under Note Input > Plugins > Color Pitches. In older versions, it'll be in the plugins somewhere. You can select a colour for each pitch, and the plugin applies them to the music you select. Results look something like this:


4

In the long run, brass instruments require only one hand, for the most part. There are also several manufacturers who make one-handed versions of woodwind instruments, though these are quite expensive. But it's very hard for a four-year-old to start on these instruments. I would recommend piano. It has been shown to be an effective means of physical therapy ...


4

TRDR: Singing, from personal experience. Since birth, my right side has been paralyzed, though not as badly as your sister. I have had singing lessons for years, and I still find them very enjoyable. I have never felt like I was hindered at singing. Another reason to choose singing is that the technical part is easy, especially at the beginning. A ...


4

I expect that eventually he'll want to take lessons from a real teacher, but I can recommend some things you might be able to show him that will help him be able to play lots of simple songs quite easily. I started my son out by showing him the primary chords for the key of C, three chords in open position, C, F, & G. Then we worked up a song using ...


4

If a child is born to parents, one speaking French, the other English, hopefully there is the opportunity for that child to use both from the start. Shouldn't be that one is neglected in favour of the other. Those that I know don't have problems. So why not get a small violin, and use that piano. Sounds like a lot of things come easy, and boredom is never ...


3

If your daughter has to practise on it, the ideal would be to have an accoustic piano. Then, if you want to use it for electronic music maybe you can have a look at pianos with "silent" mechanism. I know Yamaha makes them; I don't know about other brands, but probably they do also. They are normal accoustic pianos that incorporate a mechanism that, when ...


3

In terms getting the notes to ring, I hope she is using an electric guitar that is an appropriate size for her. In terms of playing in time, I hope she is playing with a drum track, not a metronome. In terms of teaching, I would first teach her power chords and the first blues (pentatonic minor) scale and then teach her how to approximate the songs she ...


3

I would go ukulele first, personally. A friend of mine who is a music teacher of primary school children (same age as your daughter) has bought ukuleles for her whole class and swears by them; they all absolutely love them - it's a fun, not too serious instrument that they actively enjoy learning. They are easy to pick up and put down. You can easily take ...


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