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57

Hopefully a personal anecdote as an answer is helpful: I was forced to take piano lessons when I was young. When I became a teenager, my parents made it my choice whether to continue and I chose to stop piano lessons. I did not find it exciting or fun, it was just pressing keys in a certain order every day and "making music" that I didn't recognize and didn'...


24

This does not seem to be a typo, as evidenced by a clear D♭ in the bass on page 14 of the autograph manuscript: On page 14 of Kullak's "instructive edition" found here, the editor suggests fingering the chord 5–3–1 and rolling the chord to get all three pitches:


17

This is an Turn, an ornament consisting of four notes. The double-sharp symbol indicates that the lower note to be performed is a g double-sharp rather than a natural g, so the sequnce to be performed is b, a sharp, g double-sharp, a sharp.


12

A student of mine decided he was going to learn a piece on piano. It's way above his level, and I suggested he left it for a year or so, but encouraged him to have a go, and sorted some tricky parts. Last week he turned up and played, pretty well, mostly from memory. Pedalling needs sorting - he's only just started using it. But, a great effort has paid off, ...


11

You don't want to "push hard", that's more likely to result in injury than in more endurance. As soon as your muscles start to feel tired, you should take a break. Here are some tips on managing your endurance: Take care of your general health. Eat right, stay hydrated, get some cardiovascular excercise, and get plenty of sleep. Use proper technique. Make ...


11

It's easier to identify Chopin, since he developed a very personal style. For example, if there is strong chromaticism, it's probably Chopin. But it should be noted that, toward the end of his life, Beethoven too started composing in a more chromatic manner. Listen to the Adagio of op. 106 or the Arioso in op. 110. It doesn't seem like Beethoven at all: it's ...


10

It's great to set yourself a target. Unless you push yourself, you'll never get better. I'm a guitar player, and some years ago I decided I wanted to learn "Cavatina". I practised very very slowly for about a year until I reached a point where I could actually hit all the notes. I then found I was being held back by lack of technique, so I went to a ...


9

There is nothing mysterious here. As you say, if it were slurred that would make it a tie, and that wouldn't make much sense in this setting. It all looks clear to me. Simply play the slashed Eb slightly before the beat and then start the trill on another Eb.


8

Chopin did not personally give the etudes these names. Instead, these were names given later (whether by audience members, critics, etc.). I haven't been able to determine who gave this etude the name "Wrong Note," but it certainly wasn't Chopin; in fact, he hated when people gave his pieces names. And you're right, the piece does sound lovely! But the name ...


7

What MAKES music 'Eastern European'? Partly the use of folk music - perhaps the most mentioned Nationalistic element in Chopin's music is his use of the Mazurka, loosely derived from a Polish folk dance. But to a large extent, Chopin's music is 'Polish' because we are TOLD it is. Nationalism was an important political force, Chopin was a figurehead for ...


7

I won't talk about if it's transcribed correctly or not, because I don't know the piece... However, the part you've mentioned is actually 'only' a 10th. There are a lot of people who can reach a 10th in certain key signatures, me included: This 10th for example is very easy for me to reach, in the key of C I could even get it up to an 11th: If you can't ...


7

There is no rule that says the turn has to go up one whole tone from the note you call the base. It can be a half tone or a whole tone. The turn follows the key signature unless something else is indicated. So in this case what you call the base note is A♯. If you follow the key signature then the next tone up from A♯ is B, so it should be B. And regarding ...


6

A curved line connected two notes that are the same pitch is a tie. If they are different pitches, it is a slur. In this example, the C sharps in the bottom voices in the right hand are tied, and the other voices are played legato according to the slurs.


6

There is no need to strengthen your R5 for this passage. It's not a question of force, but of control. This is a piano passage, so what you should so is reduce the energy in the three remaining notes. Then the highest note will automatically sound accented. But even if you did have to increase force on the highest note, you wouldn't do it with an isolated ...


6

As far as eastern European influence, it's pretty hard to pull that apart, and what @LaurencePayne said is spot on. To me, what defines Chopin's "style" is his heavy use of chromaticism within the framework of Tonal Harmony, especially in his modulations. A few salient examples are his Preludes in a minor and e minor, his Nocturne in D Major, Op. 27, No. 2,...


6

Your intuition is correct; it's just a move to the relative major! But we can clear up some details. Although the key signature is four flats, the music is really in B♭ minor for these first few measures; it certainly cadences in that key at the end of the first system. Following this B♭-minor chord, a sudden appearance of G♭-major shifts ...


5

If it helps, I can tell you that Ohlsson's statements don't mean a huge amount to someone with a full musical training and 50+ years of practical experience either! He's telling us something about his personal reaction to the two pieces. He feels (I think) that in one the "fireworks" are sufficient to maintain interest, in the less showy piece he has to ...


5

First of all, attempting that piece after 5 years of study is probably too early. I guess it's possible, depending on your study "regimen" for these 5 years, your age, and your natural talent, but to give you a reference, Chopin's Op.10 is in the Syllabus of the Associate Diploma (ARCT) in Piano Performance of UK's Royal Conservatory. I'm not fully familiar ...


5

While many simplified arrangements of famous pieces are terrible, it may be possible for you to either find an arrangement you like, or study the piece, determine what you like about it, and come up with an arrangement that you can enjoy playing. For Chopin's op. 10 number 11, I would suggest that you replace most of the arpeggios with a couple of notes in ...


5

I play guitar, and I tried out songs that where above my level. I managed to learn a few parts, other parts where still far from perfect, or I could not do altogether. Then I put it aside, and came back a few months later and I recognized that suddenly the whole song, also the former difficult parts became easier, and I progress faster as I am continuing ...


5

The influence of the Polish music (not only folk music) is actually well documented, it is definitely not only a cliché resulting from his political involvement in the Polish independence movement. It is known that, at a young age, Chopin has been fascinated by Polish folk music. Please note that his teacher (Josef Elsner) was author of two major studies ...


5

The hesitations (and the speed) are related to the "legato". It will take time and practice, but eventually you will need to make the left hand "flow" a lot more, there has to be a kind of constant ebb and flow feeling to the left hand. At the moment, each time you play a chord in the left hand, it sounds sort of isolated, like individual stabs coming one ...


5

The notation is quite clear; play the d flat left and the b flat right. Of course, often the division between the staves doesn’t say much about division between the hands, but in the case of Chopin (who was an excellent pianist himself) and in the case of this study, it is clear what is meant. But should you do it? You are always free to choose a different ...


4

If you can play this study beautifully, using your own fingering, any fingering, that should be good enough. But where it fits the hand, why not use 4? I'm looking at the Cortot edition (highly recommended; his fingering in particular is generally very very good), and in the very first bar the first pair of octaves is marked 5-5, the second 5-4. All of these ...


4

It seems user314159 got it right in his comment where he said there is no consensus, and to prove it here's yet another approach by the composer and piano pedagogue Louis Kholer, where he, interestingly enough, specifies the finger for the f# in the second (an octave below) passage, but not in the first passage. The two phrases are almost identical and the ...


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