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1

In addition to the other answers, there is a more general concept of full tone and semitone chord movement in chord changes in general. This is frequently employed as a major triad or one of its inversions. Often, the bass note sometimes is and sometimes is not a part of the harmonic triad. You also often see the inverse of this, where only the base note ...


2

The chord sequence C - Bb - F (or variations on it) is common in modal music where the scale more often uses the minor 7th. It's also a frequent element of rock music, for example in the song Can't get enough of your love. The relative major/minor relationship between C major and A minor should be clear, of course.


9

The "Neapolitan chord" answer deserves to be the accepted answer, but I'd like to add another use for Bb in Amin. The bII can be used as a tritone substitution for the V, and particularly the V7. In Amin, for example, E7 resolves to Amin (or Amaj, but here Amin) basically because E7 has G# and D, but Bb7 also has Ab and D (assuming G# and Ab are the same ...


25

This is a very common concept known as the Neapolitan chord. In short, the Neapolitan chord is typically a major chord built on the lowered second scale degree; you'll occasionally see/hear it called the ♭II. It's also commonly in first inversion, so you'll also occasionally hear it called the "Neapolitan six(th)," the "six" indicating the figured bass ...


0

In my opinion it is quite senseless to ask about tempo in romantic music as performances in this style are mostly full with ritenutos and rubatos, accelerandos and allargandos inspired of the moment and also the dynamics can be played impulsive, affectiv, (impressionism/ expressionism, affection more than any other period, also in respect to the underlying ...


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