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2

You seem to have a misconception of chord inversion. The term inversion refers to the bass note and as the bass tone is always A all iv chords are in root position, that is: every chord here is in root position Em,Am,B7,A because the bass tone is the root note of all chords. If you look at the r.h. only, the triads are "inverted" but we don't ...


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Because the bass notes are always the same, technically each chord is in the same inversion. However, the right hand in this case can really be thought of as practicing the chords in all inversions.


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Inversions are determined by the bass note of the chord. The chord third in the bass is a first inversion, chord fifth, second inversion, chord seventh third inversion, etc. Sometimes the top harmony note will be mentioned but that harmonically doesn't make much difference. (It may make a big difference in playing though and in the sound.) Inversions are ...


3

Any chord remains the same chord regardless the order or position of its notes. So A-C-E is always A minor -- and thus the iv chord in this context -- no matter what pitch is on the bottom, middle, or top. As long as the only pitches involved are A-C-E, it's A minor. The inversion of the chord is determined by the lowest pitch. In the case of A minor, A ...


1

Although the presence of a note on a strong beat hints at its importance, it is not definitive. In this case, the A in the bass is an accented lower neighbor – not actually part of the defining harmony. The B in the bass is the actual chord tone. Responding to the comment on the other answer: no, even if the A were the only pitch in the bass, it could still ...


0

This is an example of an appoggiatura, an added non-chord note that is resolved to the regular note of the chord. This is more often seen in melody lines. Since the underlying harmony is B, that's what the chord symbol shows.


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Slash chords serve several distinct functions. You already identified the first two: they describe inversions (e.g., C/E) they offer alternate spellings of known chords (e.g., C/D instead of D7sus) they describe chords that might not be otherwise easily described (e.g., B/C or Gb/A) So, can we define slash chords in ways that only capture the first usage? (...


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I agree with most of what has been written. The one exception where I would rather write Em/C than CMaj7 is if the C is a pedal tone/point that has been started before that chord and probably continues after. (example of C as a pedal point is Jump by Van Halen, though it uses G7/C rather than Em/C). It's a subtle distinction. Many listeners and musicians ...


1

Slash chord notation is meant to signal to the reader that the bass is acting independently of the rest of the chord above. I disagree with this. Bass is an independent voice, and it might be well expected that a good bass player won't stick to the roots of the chords, appropriately for a given style, and in accordance with other musicians, in particular ...


4

Slash bass is widely used for both inversions and what we might call 'rudimentary polychords' such as C/D. The whole point of C/D is that it DOESN'T include A. And the chord has a quite different flavour with and without an A. OK, the jazz improviser won't take any notice of that. But most musical performances are not jazz improvisations, the aim as ...


12

Who is it meant for, are you writing the notation for jazz players, pop/rock or is it a hymnal or what? Cmaj7 is not that strange, but it's just written communication from people to people, so you are allowed to take your target audience into account. If you mean that the keyboard player should keep the same right-hand chord and the bass should step down, ...


3

The idea of slash chord is that the first part indicates the overall harmony of the chord, and the different bass alters the "color" of that harmony, but without changing its role. This is very important, as the chord indicates not only the triad, but the possible scale intended for that chord. Let's take your example of E-/C and Cmaj7. Given an E ...


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Figures like 5/3 are abstractions. The don't really tell you exactly what intervals are above the bass. In effect the figure tells you the chord tone identity (like root, third, fifth, etc.) of the bass. The figures give you the intervals above the bass for a hypothetical close position voiced chord. So, for example, in the key of C major, with an E in the ...


1

This is rooted in figured bass, which was really something like modern chord naming. You could spread a Major 9th chord over the entire keyboard, but that doesn't change the notes that make up the chord. A C in the bass with a 53 written over it means that the other notes you need are those a 3rd and a 5th above C.


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