10

A C major to Eb major chord succession is very common in classical style music. It's termed a "chromatic mediant." The "strict" definition is two major or two minor chords having roots a third apart. It's a smooth transition in that there is a common tone between the chords. C major and Eb major share the note G. These provide a nice &...


6

This is a little hard to answer, because Hindemith was (somewhat famously) idiosyncratic, inconsistent, and unclear with his own theories and analyses. But I’ll answer the best I can. Throughout this answer, I’ll reference three texts in addition to Hindemith’s own Craft of Musical Composition (Unterweising im Tonsatz): The Music of Paul Hindemith by David ...


6

The first two lines are in the key of C major, then then the song modulates to Eb major. The modulation is unprepared: there is nothing at the end of the second line that makes us anticipate the change. To me the change seemed quite sudden, but there are indeed two factors that glue the two parts togeter. as ttw and Bennyboy1973 wrote, there is some ...


6

Given that the song shifts to E♭ major, and E♭ major shares the same key signature as C minor, I don't think it would be unreasonable to draw a connection. That being said, motion by 3rds, either minor OR major, is pretty common, because of notes shared between them. C-A major (share E) C-A♭ major (share C) C-E major (share E) C-E♭ major (share G) Note that ...


4

The last chord of bar 21 is a secondary dominant, leading us to the first chord of bar 22. The second chord of bar 22 is actually an augmented sixth chord. Notice the fact that the C flat is spelled as a B natural, which is in the 1st violins, which then resolves up to the C. On the other hand, the D flat in the cellos and basses resolves down to also a C. ...


3

Chords are not defined simply by the notes in them; rather, they are defined by their musical role. So adding a 9th to a subdominant chord ... it's still a subdominant chord – subdominant is a role. However, ignoring the original name of the chord, a chord (in the key of D) containing G, A, and D could easily sound like a Dsus (tonic) or an A7sus4 (dominant) ...


2

Seems to me tha verse has actually gone into key E. There are A and Am, both of which are commonplace in key E, and using Bm instead of E7 is a not unusual way to get to IV, A. The Bm has B, D, F♯, so sounds somewhat like E9. On the 2nd question - modes will and do appear in some songs, although nowhere near as common as the 'main' modes of Ionian and ...


2

Basically, you are hinting at a A7sus4 chord, but the method you describe to get there is the issue. I think this description... ...add a 9th to a subdominant IV chord... and this one ...in D major...adding an A to the G chord and losing the 3rd...You would have the notes G A and D. ...are presenting some contradictory ideas that are part of the ...


2

I think the basic theory idea you are looking for is that each tone of a diatonic scale (exluding TI and MI) can be chromatically altered, raised a half step, to become a temporary leading tone to the diatonic tone above. And importantly, only that one altered tone is needed to create the secondary dominants. These alterations can be inserted into ordinary ...


2

Stepwise movement in a bass line tends to make it difficult to retain many notes between chords. There are some procedures (1500-1900 or so) called the "Rule of the Octave" or "Règle de l'Octave" which do what you describe. These place various chords above a diatonic octave bass line. The point is that during improvisation, one may have a ...


1

The video is demonstrating the use of a lead sheet, in which only the melody and chord symbols are given. It's up to the pianist to decide how to play the chords. It is a separate arrangement from the one shown in the first image. To my knowledge, a I chord in Cmaj is C-E-G but only C-B-D are used. The I in this case isn't describing an individual chord; ...


1

Here are a couple of options to get you started. I ii7 I6 IV I64 IV6 viio I C D-7 C/E F C/G F/A Bdim C X:0 M:4/4 K:C L:1/2 %%score V1 | V2 V:V1 V:V2 clef=bass middle=D [V:V1] [Ec] [Fc] | [Gc] [Ac] | [Ec] [Fc] | [Fd] [Ec] || [V:V2] C D | E F | G A | B c || I vii6 iii IV V7 vi V6 I C Bdim/D Em F G7 Am G/B C X:0 M:4/4 K:C ...


1

I think it really depends on how you define "simple" in terms of this inner-voice chromatic line. It sounds as if you're equating simplicity with smoothness—that is, how much a line moves. Since the line consistently moves the smallest interval in common Western music, the half step, the line therefore must be simple. But I would argue the opposite:...


1

would adding an A to the G chord and losing the 3rd make the chord dominant? You would have the notes G A and D. Not really. The main issue is the note D, which clashes with the leading tone, C#. Presence of notes A and D in the same chord suggests the root isn't A. Some other people suggested it might be interpreted as A7sus4 – yes, maybe, but this doesn't ...


1

No, changing the chord quality via suspending the second of the chord is not going to make it dominant. But with that said, placing that A in the bass would make a strong case for reinterpreting the chord as a different type of dominant chord: [A G D] is nearly [A G B D], which would be G/A or A9sus, a suspended dominant chord. Gsus2 is a fairly ambiguous ...


1

Adding a 9th does nothing but add a new note to an existing chord and that does not make it dominant. You have more than one alteration to your chord not indicated in your title. Namely dropping the 3rd. You can add the 9th to the IV chord and have a G add 9 = (G B D A). If you drop the 3rd you have a suspended 2 chord (G A D). This would most likely ...


1

There are a number of things you can do but the hardest is always best. First, since you know all your chords, explore the upper and lower neighbors of each chord tone. The basic C chord is CEG, so randomly experiment with the half step note below each of those notes, those are the lower neighbors. Then experiment with the upper neighbors which are a half ...


1

When you check most existing melodies, you'll find that some, at least, of the notes used in any bar are chordal notes. Think about it - if the notes and the chord didn't blend, or match, then either the notes or the chord (possibly both!) will be wrong! The main note in any bar is generally the one on the first beat. Since that beat is more emphasised than ...


1

Completely agree with Tim above. In case a helper sheet may be of use, here is my mine listing the modes, keys and chords. HTH - catz


1

This may well be perceived as a dupe - there are already lots of similar questions on this site. However - you consider A Dorian. Let's look at the notes from A dorian. A B C D E F♯ G. The chords for the song are A C G and D. There's certainly a 1 and 3 from each of those chords in the whole mode - C&E, G&B, D&F♯, but it doesn't bode so well for ...


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