16

The scale/chords are good clues to the key of a song, but at least as important is the tonal center. That's not as easy to define but generally it's where the song comes back to a place of less musical tension. IMHO the chord played when the song in question returns to a "rest" state is A major. Which means I would say the song is in A and the ...


7

It's true that piano doesn't offer the similarity between chord shapes that guitar does, though that's not true of all chords (i.e., those that have open strings). To play the same progression in multiple keys on guitar will also frequently involve rearranging patterns a bit. Anyhow, advanced pianists often spend a lot of time practicing patterns in ...


5

A complete song need not be just in one key, and stay in that key throughout. I guess that's one good thing about relative key signatures - they are identical. There are many songs which may be in relative major for the verse, and move to relative minor for the chorus - or vice versa. There are many songs which move between the two relatives during the verse/...


3

The necessary observation is that her left hand is always playing the roots of the ii-V-I progression: D-G-C. Going step by step through her modifications: ii-V-I in root position (Dmin - Gmaj - Cmaj) "Ok let's mind the voice-leading" Looking only at her right hand, she appears to play Fmaj - G7(omit 5) - Cmaj. However, you have to consider her ...


2

The answer lies in which chord is used to finish the piece (or section thereof.) If a piece ends with V-I (with I being D major and V being A major for example), one would say that that section (or piece) is in D major. To end a piece in the relative minor (same key signature but that's just for notational convenience and not universally used during the ...


2

The problem goes away if you consider D and Bm to be two sides of the same key. They have the same key signature. The Roman numeral analysis system - in the form you talk about - assumes that either the major or minor side is clearly more prominent, in order to assign number one to a scale degree. You should make a decision: do you want to subscribe to this ...


2

The song you quote with the bass line la,fa do,so and the chords Bm G D A can’t be identified as B minor or D major without listening to it. vi IV I V is one possible solution referring to major (beginning on the 6th degree) but this progression is ambivalent and it can be interpreted in Bm as i VI III bVII (b stands for the minor 7th degree of aeolian mode)...


2

If the chords are built strictly on a diatonic scale, then the progression will tend to sound like it's in the key of that scale. How strongly it will tend to sound that way depends on how the chords are used. In your example, if G was a dominant chord, then the progression would more strongly sound as in the key of C. If your G is just a triad, then those 3 ...


2

The chorus starts on a major chord. The root of that chord then drops a half step to create the mediant minor. Then the major chord returns before finally landing on the dominant. So Ab → Cm → Ab → Eb The core of the progression is the alternation across chords between the scalar root (Ab) and leading tone (G). X:0 T:Overwhelmed T:Chorus harmonic analysis C:...


2

I think you shouldn't overstate the ease of guitar chords just because you can slide a non-open chord up and down the neck. That certainly is not the whole picture of playing chords on guitar. Similarly don't discount the shape patterns that do exist on the keyboard. There are certain shapes that repeat like E, A & D major or Eb, Ab & Db major, etc. ...


2

In addition to Athanasius' great answer is the fact that virtually every chord change involves at least one note which is static. I encourage students to know what that note is for any two chords, and move fingers to the changed notes. Simple example - triads C and F. Common note C. L.H. - C E G, hold on to C, move to C F A. Practise with C on top instead - ...


2

If you understand the progression ii-V7-I and the principle of secondary dominants (e.g. D7 is dominant of the dominant=V7/V7, am7-D7=ii7-V7/V) then you will see the logic of a extended chain of (ii7-V7)-functions along the circle of fifths: dm-G7->C em-A7->D (dm) f#m-B7-> E (em) (the particular chords can have any extensions of course)


1

This is a genre-specific question, depending a lot on how deep into harmony the music we're talking about is. With pop/rock music, in general, the song is in a key, and the chords and notes are derived from that. As an example, Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Sweet Home Alabama" is arguably in G, and the chords are D, C and G, and the notes you can reach for are ...


1

Now when the song changes chords(from D to F let's say), does the notes adjust themselves(from the D maj scale to the F maj) according to what scale the current chord uses? So after changing chords to F, rather than using the 3rd note in the D scale(which is F) do we use the 3rd note in F(so we play A)? Or do we stick to the D scale and play the F note again?...


1

As it stands, the question is a little confused, but here goes. Generally speaking, notes in a bar with one chord will reflect the make up of that chord. If they don't, either they or the chord is in the wrong place. Using diatonic notes and diatonic chords - all of which will be made up from purely the notes belonging to that key, there are so many notes ...


1

It is not a C#m/G#, the third chord is an Amaj7, a IV chord in the key of E. Amaj7 does however contain a C#m triad in it. The progression is basically a 1-6-4-5. The rest of your chords are correct except for the last which I would call a B7sus4 because B11 can possibly imply it has a M3 in it. The sus4 replaces the 3 in the chord so no need to call it an ...


1

Pinpointing a specific emotion in music is a fraught endeavor. Maybe it's "sad"... or maybe it's "ennui"... or a hundred other shades of grey on a spectrum of emotions. I think it's simple enough to say generically it's emotional. It is expressive. Both in the vocal part and the guitar part. It's also in a slow tempo. Slow tempo and ...


1

As others have pointed out, whether a song is in a major key or its relative minor is often a matter of debate or opinion. However, there are some clues that can point in one or other direction. First, in specifically the harmonic minor there is a key difference, the raised leading note: thus here you would expect an A# in B minor but it would be difficult ...


1

To someone who's proficient at playing full chordal accompaniment by ear and creating backing chord progressions for melodies, chord changes can be improvised. Melodic lines, rhythms, lyrics, dance moves, etc. all aspects of music can be improvised. All degrees of freedom are open, and any order of process steps, or a mixture of them, is possible. Maybe ...


1

First pay attention to the notes which are common or held between chord... ...ideally you don't want to change fingers on those tones unless a change of position is necessary. So, instead of thinking it's three finger placements in the first chord followed by four finger placements in the second chord, think of the first chord as three fingers placed and ...


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