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7

To disambiguate (G♭)(13) from (G)(♭13), use superscripts: G♭13, G♭13. Wikipedia shows examples like . Here, the flat isn't superscripted, so what it modifies is the G. Even without the flat and the M7, the sharp is superscripted, so it modifies the 5 instead of the G.


6

As a bass singer in an amateur SATB choir I think this is acceptable. I haven't played the notes, but going from the 4th note on a scale to the 5th (only an octave lower) and back to the 1st note is not uncommon. The key question is probably how well notes fit a given harmony in general and how well they fit the respective chords. Singing Bb C F in your ...


5

Depending on how this is voiced, this F♯ might be better understood not as a chord tone but as a passing tone from the G in the first chord to the E in the last chord. For example: Some musicians have a habit of making a chord out of every vertical stacking of pitches. But sometimes (perhaps most of the time?) there's a melodic explanation that is ...


5

It could be G - B - D - F# ( G + Bm) which is the Gmaj7 chord // G can be something else besides the bass note, and then it would be a Gmaj7 chord in some inversion. With B as the bass note it would be Gmaj7 in first inversion. Something else that is really common in harmony, that can easily be done in your chord progression is to play the G chord, then ...


5

...enharmonic respelling of D dim7 to fit better with the key of C minor. I don't follow your meaning. That chord is probably best described as viio6/5 tones `D F Ab B♮). As far as resolution goes, I think what you have in the bass clef is the standard thing: viio in first inversion with the leading tone and supertonic moving in contrary motion to the ...


5

A C major chord has a close relationship to the F minor scale. The dominant of F minor is C. Also, although E is flat in the key signature of F minor, as the leading note (just before the tonic F), it is often before raised to E natural. So, a C major chord is common in F minor and will lead to the tonic chord F minor.


5

I'm not quite sure why F-Ab-C-D would be considered closer to FmM7 than Fm7; in any event, your chord is an Fm6 chord. You could also interpret the chord D-F-Ab-C as a Dm7b5, or half-diminished chord. The minor/major part of FmM7 indicates that the chord is an Fm chord with a major 7th, to distinguish it from an Fm7 with a minor 7th; note that the "minor" ...


5

I think it's just a matter of where to put this new part. Of course there is no right answer, but most commonly this part would fit after the second chorus, before the very last chorus. Your new form would then be: Intro Verse Bridge Chorus Intro Verse Bridge Chorus New part Chorus (maybe twice?) Wikipedia has an article on Song structure, that also cites ...


4

Superscript is the ideal, but... But these pages... https://bretpimentel.com/jazz-chord-symbols-a-primer-for-the-classically-trained/ http://musictheoryprof.com/2014/05/how-to-interpret-chord-symbols/ http://music.arts.uci.edu/dobrian/f14/music16D/dobrianchordsymbols.htm ...seem to show some kind of convention to use parentheses if for some reason ...


4

Any time chord symbols are written like this, the first part is always the root. B♭9♭13 is always a 9♭13 chord built on the note B♭. If the composer wanted a B chord with a flat ninth, he/she would have made it clear, via "Badd♭9♭13" or "B(♭9♭13)". Makes sense because altered extensions must either come after some kind of natural extension (B7♭9, where the 7 ...


4

The simplest answer is that chords are borrowed from the parallel key quite often. This is in key A minor, and all the other chords are diatonic to it and its various scale notes. So, yes, it could easily be seen to come from A melodic minor. That will explain the E major chord as well. But it's just as easily seen to come from the parallel key - of A major -...


4

We should be careful to distinguish between tonality, key, tonic, key signature, etc. I like Tymoczko's definition of tonality which is something like: a system of consistent harmony using a limited collection of tones with one central goal tone (my summary.) A major and C# Aeolian are tonalities sharing the same collection of tones, but with different ...


4

By definition, playing a Gm7/B♭ chord means the bass voice must sing a B♭. If you want to modify the second chord so that the bass voice doesn't jump by a seventh, try bringing that B♭ down an octave (or raising everything else appropriately) so the B♭ resolves up to a C. That should sound much smoother. Alternatively, you could invert your V chord. I ...


3

D in the key of A minor is a fairly common sound, and there are a couple ways to view it. For starters, let's get this out of the way first: D major is not in the key of A minor, as you've noticed. D major is, however, diatonic to A dorian. As you've noticed, it's also diatonic to A melodic minor. In the specific case you've outlined, it sounds like it's ...


3

If you want to maintain the same chords and also want the top/melody line to stay the same, I would just go with one of these:


3

There isn't a name for this specific progression, but it might make sense to call it a circle of fifths turnaround. Let's assume you're in C; this would make the progression: | C Maj | A♭Maj | E♭Maj | B♭Maj | Here are some things that make the progression interesting: the change from major tonality (in measure 1) minor tonality (in measures 2-4) measures ...


2

Since the first chord is already a G, I think I would probably just call it Gmaj7 which is G B D F#. If the added G is in the bass, you could also just call it a Bm chord over a G in the bass, which would be notated like this: Bm/G A Bm6 chord would be B - D - F# - G# instead of G natural.


2

This could be a section B) or refrain of a song in A-minor (C-major) beginning with the subdom. iv ending on Am (A7 will be the secondary domînant for the loop of the refrain) iv-VI-III ... in A minor or ii-V-I in C major (Bb could be set as a Neapolitan 6th - but it isn't here in your progression) I'd use maj7, 9 and 13 chords as example: Dm9-G13-...


2

German... #iv6/5 French... ii#6/4/3 In the case of the German I put the sharp in front of the Roman numeral to show the chord root is altered. Whereas in the French the chord root is not altered, but the 6th gets the sharp because it is raised chromatically from the diatonic sixth. Of course the point here is to make clear none of the augmented sixth ...


2

The names It.6, Fr.6 and Ger.6 are pretty common ones. I've also seen some other names like: IV 6# 5b for the German IV 6# or #IV 6 for the Italian II 6# 4 3 for the French These are less common, but they are more "thorough" because they say on which chord they are built on and what notes are altered. You are correct that in most cases these chords are ...


2

A lot can depend on the rhythm and voice leading, but if we skip that for the moment, you could abstract your progression to... Am... Dm and B... E First it goes to the subdominant and then it goes to the dominant. Tonally that is very clear harmony. If you are somehow emphasizing D and E as targets, it should make the tonality even more emphatically ...


2

The melody could certainly help define this ambiguous question. ;) But I'll first answer the subject line. Q: Can a melody determine the key of an ambiguous chord progression A: A melody can, if not determine, at least very strongly suggest an entire chord progression. And a key. However, the key is ultimately in the ear of the listener. Q: Does the ...


2

The bass just moves ^4 ^5 ^1 or FA SOL DO or Bb C F. I think the ideal thing is for ^4 ^5 to be an upward step rather than a descending 7th. But, the upper voices need to be reviewed. According to Piston's Harmony ii V (including ii6 V) is different than other descending fifth root progressions. Instead of the upper voices moving up by step to the next ...


2

The suggestion of descending-fifth motion is definitely referring to the root motion, not the bass motion. Your I–vi–IV–V progression is very common, but not in these inversions. Depending on what style you're in, creating bass motion of a descending fifth (like you have) can result in "illegal" uses of six-four chords, non-resolved tendency tones, etc. ...


2

Here's my take by listening to what the clip sounds like. I just assume you transcribed them correctly enough, except for the G♭7, which I think is better explained as F♭/G♭ or D♭m7/G♭. G♭ : tonic G♭7 : Instead of "G♭7" it sounds more like F♭/G♭ (or E/Gb or whatever), giving a mixolydian/bluesy feel, implying that it might be going to go to B (or C♭) next, ...


2

While you can use parentheses and superscripts, there is one other option: include an implied chord tone. A G(b13) implies a 9th (otherwise it would be G7b13 or G11b13). So you can also write it as G9b13. For B(b9b13), You can write B7b9b13. This method always works. Either you'll have some sort of 7th, which doesn't use the accidentals -- there is no C(#...


2

Bb13b9 can only be one thing, but that can be made more clear by using parentheses: Bb13(b9). It is common to put altered extensions and added notes in parentheses at the end of a chord name. Also note that altered extensions are typically written in ascending order, so an altered B7 might look like B7(b9b13), or even B7b9b13, but rarely (if ever) B7b13b9, ...


2

When writing a song, say what you want to say then stop. 2½ minutes is a perfectly good length. Elvis' hit 'Teddy Bear' clocked in at 1'46". https://happymag.tv/the-seven-shortest-1-songs-to-ever-hit-the-charts/ If you've written a new section but it doesn't fit the song, you've written something that may fit in another song, but not this one. Save it ...


2

When you write a melody, you imply something about the harmony as well, and so you have some kind of a vague idea or gut instinct about chords, even if you can't or don't want to explicate any specific chords right away. You can do it either way. Think of chords first (for example by using voice-leading as a guideline for thinking up something) and place ...


2

No. Simply you are using the flavor of the mode a mode rather than substituting a chord a tritone. The flavor of Phygian comes out in the lower second rather than it being a chromatic substitution. Let's talk about the simplest form of a tritone substitution. We have the progression Dm7 - G7 - CMaj7 (ii7 - V7 - IM7). We could easily change the G7 to a D&...


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