7

A bit more detail following piiperi's good suggestion. First play a good clean chord. Try to have at least some fingers touching others. Then release pressure, but still keep fingers touching the strings. press down again, and strum, to check the sound is still clean. Do this with each chord several times. Next, play a chord, but this time, take your ...


7

The 'middle 8', as in so many songs, is a jump to a slightly remote chord then a 'cycle of 5ths' sequence back to the tonic. But this time it hits the tonic and keeps on going! Bm7, Em7, Am7, D7, Gmaj7 (we're home) Cmaj7, F - then a side-slip back to the dominant (D7) and home (G). Nice, isn't it! I could come up with some theory about bVII being a ...


5

I would say that E minor seems to be the clear prevailing tonality in this example. You have B chords going to Em chords, and that's quite common in minor (theorists call it harmonic minor when they raise the seventh note to the leading tone). Every note in the chords you wrote actually fits into E harmonic minor. Even the C minor chords have that E♭ = D♯ ...


4

Practice the instantaneous pressing-down of the chord shape with your left hand fingers, without doing anything with your right hand. The pressing-down of strings makes a "hammer-on" sort of sound. It can't be as loud as fingering normally with your right hand, but try to make it reasonably loud, or at least loud enough to hear each of the fingered strings ...


4

It’s not a great idea to just shift to enharmonic names for chords, because that can obscure their function within the key. Beethoven tends to be quite careful about his enharmonic spelling. The D♭ minor chord is a iv chord, and that immediately changes into the even stronger pre-dominant function chord called a Neapolitan 6th. A Neapolitan 6th chord is ...


3

You have discovered they way I practice scales. If you are playing C mixolydian after playing C maj you are in the Key of F maj. C Dorian is Bb Maj, etc. You are changing key up a 4th each time you change modes like this, and as you discovered the pattern comes back to Ionian but a half step up from where you started. Keep going until you've covered the ...


3

The G#m7 sounds like Tommy Emmanuel just wanted spice it up with something a little bit "outside" and not so obviously V dominant, and G#m7 was readily available after the F#m7. In a more stereotypical, but perhaps boring and predictable form it would be G - C - F#m7 - B7 - Em7 - Am7 - D - G. If you want to get rid of the last remaining out-of-scale ...


3

I think it works there because it is the end of the circle of 5ths (not necessarily all dominant, but the root movement anyway starting with the Bm7) , but the F chord (FAC), especially with the melody notes A and E are substituting for ii there in a ii V I progression going back to G. The F note acts as sort of a suspension resolving to the E. One has to be ...


2

First one's correct! Never heard of 'broken'. Interrupted maybe? Not going to do the homework - even if it's not! Teach a guy to fish and all that! As simply as possible: cadences only involve the final two harmonies, whatever comes before doesn't count. Perfect - V>I or V>i in minor. Plagal - IV>I, or iv>i in minor. Interrupted - usually V>vi, but will ...


2

The change is effectively from D to G, with the questionable chord being the transition. Often, that D will have its ♭7 added (C), making it into D7. Sometimes, M9 is also added, (E), making the chord now D9. Let's look at the make-up of Am7: A C E G. Compare with D9: D F♯ A C E. Several notes the same in each - namely A C and E. That could ...


2

Rarely, if ever, the question of "why does this sound good/bad" can be answered once and for all, as it will always be subjective to some extent. So, let me just offer one way of looking at it, and see if it makes sense to you. So, try this: Temporarily replace the Am7 with Cmaj7 (i.e. its relative major chord). Your sequence now becomes D, C, G, Bb. (...


2

Nice chords! I see them as: G - Cmaj7 - A6 - B6 - Em7 - Cmaj7 - D/F# - G The A6 takes it towards G lydian, then the B6 briefly takes it further out into lydian augmented space - before returning to "normal" from Em7.


2

Since the focus of the question seems to be about the G#m7 chord, I would point out that it forms a chromatic mediant relation to the Em7 chord that follows after. Roots G# and E are a third apart and the chord qualities are the same. I think that is better description than calling G#m7 an inverted B6. If the B6 is presumably the dominant of Em then the G# ...


2

Like @filipkv said it is e minor, specifically two e minor chords. It's a chord progression that is missing the progression. In music theory terms it is literally i-i, e-e. If you play it you will get the feeling it isn't doing very much or moving slowly. Also, the term chord progression isn't applied to one chord necessarily, but to the entire set of ...


2

I think that's just E minor. Two different voicings. Technically the first chord is not a chord, but an interval. But it's implied to be E minor.


2

If you know the chords well that is a plus. When changing chords during strumming, quickly lift all your fingers simultaneously off the strings of the first chord and with the shape of the next chord in your head try and make your fingers change to the new shape all at once and land simultaneously on the next chord. The idea is to make it one consolidated ...


2

The chord root's relation to the tonic. You can expand that to say: the relationship of tones to the tonic and tonic chord. The idea of function is definitely something that was developed long, long after scales and harmony developed over the ages. Try to get away from the idea that chords come from a fixed scale. The only thing that is pretty well ...


1

At the highest level, the why is because traditional western music is goal oriented. The goal in this case is to resolve to tonic, or I. How you get to that goal is your chord progressions. Within that progression there are lots of rules but the basic idea is only certain combinations of chords go together. As @michael-curtis said you can have G-C, which is ...


1

I hear the same Gregorian70 I (ii-V): vi IV = G (F#m B) em the chords in the TAB are not quite correct: but here is the tutorial by Emmanuel himself: It reminds me of Yesterday (and I pretend that’s what it’s meant to be.)


1

The progression starts in G major (first two chords) then goes "somewhere else" in the middle (next 2-3 chords), and ends in G major (last 3-4 chords). Therefore I don't think it will be very controversial to say that the as a whole the piece is in G major. But I also suspect that you'll find a lot of different ways of analyzing and interpreting that "...


1

"Is this concept of taking a certain melody and playing it over different chord progressions in different sections of the song "poor form" for any reason?" I would urge you to reverse the thinking and realize that melodies don't get played over chords. Chords are supposed to support the melody. That being said it is quite common for soloists to structure ...


1

You really have to listen to the song to determine what the harmonies are doing here. Otherwise, you're just guessing. After listening to the song, I agree that the song is in G minor, but I also feel a pretty strong pull to B♭ major, the relative major key, right on that F chord. This is a loop of three chords, and I think there's definitely merit in ...


1

Scale tones in G Aeolian = G A Bb C D Eb F Some extrapolated chords = Gm7, Cm7, FM, EbM7, Bbsus4 The AbM7 is only one half step off (A instead of Ab); the C, Eb, and G are already in the scale. It's impossible to know with certainty the songwriter's process without asking them but perhaps they just liked the sound of a chromatic raise (as so many writers ...


1

One more explanation for this chord - this loop progression can actually be viewed as an example of bitonicity: shifting between two key centers at regular intervals. The loop is Dmaj7 Am7 Gmaj7 B♭maj7 . The two keys being shifted between are D major and G major. We start with Dmaj7, an obvious indicator of D Ionian. We then move to Am7, which is ...


1

IF C is the tonic, then you probably want to consider @AlbrechtHugli's point in comments. If you omit the D7 you get something very, very familiar C - F - C. You could call that a kind plagal progression, basically it just shifts back and forth from tonic to subdominant. Functionally that doesn't go anywhere. It just prolongs the tonic. Interposing the ...


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