7

These minor v chords are not typically viewed as dominant in function, no. Instead, they most often function as passing chords. Imagine we pass from i through v6 down to VI (or even iv6). In these cases the v chords very clearly do not reach the hierarchical level of a "real" dominant and instead are just voice-leading conduits leading from one ...


6

This is ultimately the claim made by the concept of negative harmony. (See the negative-harmony tag for some other questions and answers about it.) In short, negative harmony inverts chords around the tonic root/fifth axis. You're in C major, so we can invert chord tones around the C/G axis, which is the same as inverting around the E/E♭ axis. (Yet another ...


6

D,F,Ab,C have 3 tones in common with B,D,F,Ab which is considered as a rootless V7b9 chord. (The tone C would be the suspended 4th of G7 ...) Maybe that's what you perceive when playing Dm7b5 or Fm resolving to C. Indeed Dm7b5 is often used as substitution of Dm7 in a IIm7-V7 and D7-G7 would be secondary dominant of G7. All melody lines leading from C to B ...


6

Assuming your transcription is correct, that is not a ♯V chord, but a ♭VI chord. This is borrowed from the tonic minor and provides a powerful pull to the dominant (because of the half-step-downward resolution of the ♭VI chord's root, third, and fifth).


5

No, it isn't a dominant chord. More of a subdominant. But there are plagal cadences as well as perfect cadences. If you want to say that the IV (or its variations) in a IV-I cadence has 'dominant function', as in 'a chord that isn't the tonic and leads well to it', fair enough. But that doesn't make it a dominant chord. Not all progressions are ...


5

With Roman numeral analysis you can put sharps and flats on the Roman numerals to show the root is altered. But, while a altered dominant root with ♭V makes sense a ♯V does not. Here is why... Usually such alteration are about borrowed chords or mode mixture. For example, in a major key you can have a ♭VII borrowed from mixolydian. When you add flats in the ...


4

Essentially, "yes." But you really don't want to think of it as "dominant in the scale of the destination chord." Instead think of it as the dominant to the destination tonic. The simple reason being that, using the given example with a secondary dominant of A7, the A7 is dominant in both D major and D minor. Also, in the sense that "...


4

In a secondary dominant such as "V of V", you think about the "of V" being a temporary I. For example if you go to Dm using a secondary II-V of Dm, then you do it as if in the key of Dm, for example Em7 and A7. We say that we're "in" a key. But not "in a scale". "In D minor" means in the key of D minor. Key ...


3

Any chord has specific notes which make up that chord. Any scale has no bearing at all on that fact. So the question itself isn't clear. In whatever key, A7, for example, comprises A C♯ E G. Even in a key with no sharps, but flats instead. So the chord A7 will have those 4 notes even in D♭, with 5 flats. EDIT: actually using your example, we quite often DO ...


3

(Expanding on Dekkadeci's answer) the bVI7, sometimes with a few modifications, is a common predecessor to the V chord (perhaps through the I64 to avoid parallels or just to extend the piece). These are the "Augmented Sixth" chords (with geographic names). There are two musical "tricks" happening, the half-step move from the b6 to the 5 ...


2

The half diminished chord on ii, key C, utilises D, F, A♭ and C. The same notes as iv6 - Fm6. F, A♭, C and D (both in root position). So here, a subdominant chord. Which does sound quite dominant, mainly as to get to C major, the C doesn't move, the A♭ moves a semitone to G, and the F moves a semitone to E. The semitone moves from dominant to tonic are the ...


1

In my opinion this is a borrowed chord! Why do you hear this passage still in Gm? I'm interpreating it in Bb (the Gb chord "shows" definitely a modulation to the relative Bb key - for my ears: Let's say Gm is the vi degree of the relative key Bb, then we have: vi-bVI So I'd say - transwriting Michael Curti's answer: Gm |Gb Bb |Eb dm ...


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