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4 votes

what is G7-Bᵒ7/C doing in the chord progression

I see it as G7 -> Cm7 so V-I in relative minor where Bo7/C functions more as a passing chord which is an altered prolongation of the dominant. So it is definitely not "resolving" chord, ...
Jarek.D's user avatar
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4 votes

what is G7-Bᵒ7/C doing in the chord progression

The easiest wat to conceptualize this is that G7 and Bo7 are basically the same thing. Bo7 is a G7b9 with no root and G7b9 would be an acceptable substitute for the G7 in this situation. The end ...
John Belzaguy's user avatar
3 votes

The transition from G to C in guitar chord progressions

How can I prevent myself from such an error of ascribing this chord sequence to ascending fourth rather than a perfect fifth ascending? By not thinking of progressions this way. If we name chords by ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Identity of scale of chord progression I created

If you didn't use a scale to generate the chords, then there isn't really any reason to think all of the chords are going to fit into one scale. I've spent a long while trying to identify what scale ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
2 votes

what is G7-Bᵒ7/C doing in the chord progression

Have you listened carefully to the original version? It's a 1930s recording. I just did, and I honestly could not say if that Bdim chord is really on a C or a B. (Bass is often rather muffled on these ...
danmcb's user avatar
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2 votes

what is G7-Bᵒ7/C doing in the chord progression

...I was trying to do RN analysis... On a lead sheet! Be prepared to look at multiple lead sheets, and do the necessary transposing to compare them, then reinterpret the chord symbols for clearer ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

What is the purpose of the A Maj chord in the key of B Maj

In the parallel key of B minor, there exists the chord of A major. So, that's where the theory makes it fit. It's a very oft used chord in any key - ♭VII as it's known. I often refer to it as IV/IV, ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 194k
1 vote

Building muscle memory for playing chords by ear, with piano chord inversions

Simple answer is - loads of practice! Get used to moving l.h. from any chord (start with basic triads) to any other. You may decide to start with root position to root position. You may decide to keep ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 194k
1 vote

Building muscle memory for playing chords by ear, with piano chord inversions

You're assuming a basic simplification of muscle memory for melody, but that's actually a bit more complex: it's not just about moving fingers on the right or the left, you also need to know the ...
musicamante's user avatar
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1 vote

The transition from G to C in guitar chord progressions

Playing those particular shapes for C and G on guitar, the lowest notes(roots) actually do go a 4th down. From C on 5th string fret3 down to 6th string fret3. Nothing wrong at all - and it's reflected ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 194k
1 vote

The transition from G to C in guitar chord progressions

C - G is a 5th up or a 4th down. C - D is a 2nd up or a 7th down. That's it really. Modify your assumptions accordingly.
Laurence's user avatar
  • 93.3k

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