11

You can ask the Greek or look up the theories of Boethius, Glarean, Caspar Printz, Ernst Kurth etc ... The answers will be more traditional than opinion based. But did you look up wikipedia under characteristics / qualities of intervals? I did and couldn’t find much information. The key words are psycological effects of harmonical intervals The idea that ...


10

The only thing about the distribution of voices that Roman numeral analysis provides is which voice is in the bass. Just some background on the symbols... The Arabic numerals added to Roman numerals are a historical hold over from figured bass and an approach to harmony that was more about counterpoint. The figures told a keyboard accompanist what type of ...


8

Where you play the notes - in which ocatve, or even how they split - root in bass and others in r.h., or split them two with each, etc., is very much up to you, as the player. It's called voicing, and as PiedPiper says, when all the notes are as close as possible, it's called 'close position' or 'close voicing'. The opposite being 'open voicing'. It matters ...


6

The D#dim7 works in a C major context because it is the secondary dominant of the Em7 chord immediately following it. It's basically vii°7/iii (followed by iii7) there. I don't think that chord progression is similar to the walkdown in Sting's It's Probably Me; I'd analyze that Sting chord progression as having common-tone chords, not secondary dominants.


4

In classical functional harmony, non-diatonic chords are usually diatonic to a related tonal center, so the answer is that it depends on what the local tonal center is. Normally, the ♭Ⅶ chord will be taken from the parallel minor or a related key. For example, it can be Ⅴ/♭Ⅲ, where ♭Ⅲ is the relative major of the parallel minor. The first example that ...


4

The roman numerals say nothing about how you distribute the notes in the chord. The V chord contains the notes G, B and D, but you can play them anywhere. If you play the chord so that all the notes are within one octave, this is known as 'close position'.


4

This 'diminished run' is one of the most prevalent cliches in popular music, from Ellington to Sondheim. It's all about the voice leading. Sometimes we label the intermediary notes with chord names, sometimes we don't bother and just write the notes. It only really works with the one specific voicing - a run in parallel thirds. Filling in 'full chords' ...


3

It looks like root movements: down a P4, up a d5, up an A3. The pattern is elided where the ending F# chord of the first four chord group becomes the first chord of the next four chord set. Like this... C G Db F# F# C# G C In the second group the final root movement changes the A3 to the enharmonic equivalent P4. If you then elide the ending C ...


2

The problem here seems to be that it is the G7/D chord that would resolve well to C, but following it with Am and F takes the progression in another direction, and just ending on G7/D, Am, F, C indeed doesn't sound all that final unless you carefully choose the voicing. And also, if the previous part had a repetition of those four chords, there's nothing ...


1

I think I've figured it out. I tried to use C/G and it now sounds about right. I also tried using the C chord with a C added in the octave lower, and it worked too, but less so. And it still is kind of a resolution on the I chord, but it works.


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