11 votes

Doja Cat - Paint the Town Red Chord Progression

This progression is sampled from a Dionne Warwick’s “Walk On By” written by Burt Bacharach and Hal David in the early 1960’s. It is not uncommon to use a ii chord with a natural 5th in pop music in a ...
John Belzaguy's user avatar
9 votes

Does melody come from root progressions?

Historically, melody existed long before harmony. Before the modern theories of chords were developed, people were writing music that we can analyze harmonically today without any harmonic theory: ...
phoog's user avatar
  • 22.9k
7 votes

What is this descending riff of notes referred to as?

That riff is called a montuno. It is actually only a snippet of a montuno because a montuno is generally a repetitive rhythmic pattern that extends over many bars and also outlines the harmony with ...
John Belzaguy's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

What is the function of G Major in the key of B Major

Unfortunately your key, chords and enharmonic spelling are inaccurate. The key is G# minor (not Ab minor) the relative minor of B. The passage can also be spelled in Ab minor but then everything else ...
John Belzaguy's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

Explain chord progression

Whenever you encounter a non-diatonic chord, it's worth checking if it's a modal interchange or a secondary chord. And perhaps also trying enharmonic spelling variations. G# and A# could be rewritten ...
user1079505's user avatar
  • 16.7k
7 votes
Accepted

How to Identify & Complete Sequences

Sequence A sequence is a musical pattern that is repeated in transposed form. Melodic vs. Harmonic (a.k.a. Tonal vs. Real) In a melodic sequence, the literal pattern is repeated. In a harmonic ...
Aaron's user avatar
  • 88k
6 votes
Accepted

Rachmaninoff - Piano Concerto No. 2 (1st movement) Tempo I - Bar 86 - why D not D flat?

The second half of the bar is a half-step-lower transposition of the first half. Note each voice: Soprano: C - D , Cb - Db Alto: G - F# , Gb - F Tenor: Eb , D Bass: Bb-A-Eb, A-Ab-(Cb) ...
Aaron's user avatar
  • 88k
6 votes

Does melody come from root progressions?

No. A lead melody can be accompanied or harmonized with countless different chords with different roots, and each alternative just feels different. A melody line may "imply" certain chords, ...
user94880's user avatar
6 votes

Why Bb7#9 in 'Michelle' and not Bbm7?

The answer to your title question is: because that’s what Paul wrote and played. The fact is, and I’m a little surprised to say, it IS a Bb7#9. I always thought based on the melody and the fact that ...
John Belzaguy's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Why does Cmaj7 and Emaj7 sound good (or a name to describe this progression)?

In general, chords with common tones and whose non-common tones are only a short distance apart will make a good progression. CMaj7 = C E G B EMaj7 = E G# B D# or, put another way: CMaj7 = E ...
Aaron's user avatar
  • 88k
5 votes

What is this descending riff of notes referred to as?

It is a very typical example of a Montuno, a common Latin (eg. salsa) piano comping riff that features (in the right hand) arpeggiated (broken) chords while accentuating (in octaves) one of the chord ...
Kris Van Bael's user avatar
5 votes

Why are triads considered perfect chords and the basis which all extensions are built off of?

Why are dyads not the basis or even considered a chord by a lot of music theorists? They certainly used to be. The modern theory of chords evolved gradually over several hundred years during which ...
phoog's user avatar
  • 22.9k
5 votes

Explain chord progression

You'll probably find it easier to justify G#, A# and D# if you spell them as A♭, B♭ and E♭. There are many reasons why a chord can 'fit'. The most simple is when it's diatonic in the home key or in ...
Laurence's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

Bb7 chord in C major , function

Despite the chromaticism this song is firmly rooted in the key of C. The F chord you are starting on is actually bar 11 of the song. That is a IV chord. The next chord, Bb7 is a tritone substitution ...
John Belzaguy's user avatar
5 votes

ii-ii6-I progression

Minor chords with inner movement within the harmony are very common in different styles of music. They may have a specific name or history, I can’t recall offhand. When a chord progression works it ...
John Belzaguy's user avatar
5 votes

Chord progressions without the tonic chord: same key or different?

I'm going to go out on a limb here and say it's all about the dominant. Although the tonic is arguably the "most important chord" to a tonality, it's the V that in some ways "defines&...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 17.2k
5 votes

Is adapting existing melodies a useful way to improve composition skill?

Adapting old melodies will most definitely improve compositional skills. Preexisting music that gained appreciation basically gives you insight into what makes a melody great. The whole process of ...
Jarek.D's user avatar
  • 1,345
4 votes

I'm so confused about modes that I can't make a specific title

Just to add on to the good answers here, and boil an important part down very simply: You've been using some modes all along. Our good old major and minor are themselves modes. Just like those, the ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 17.2k
4 votes

Why are triads considered perfect chords and the basis which all extensions are built off of?

There is a general rule for intervals, which could be phrased like: If a tone intersects a given interval in an arithmetic way (at the arithmetic mean) it will support the base tone, if it intersects ...
bakunin's user avatar
  • 307
4 votes

Why does a chord sound lower although the individual notes went up?

Probably no official name for this. But it could be that you're hearing V>IV in key C (G>F). This is a common change in any accompaniment, and trying it in different keys - A>G in key D for ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 193k
4 votes

Doja Cat - Paint the Town Red Chord Progression

Here we go again! Songs do not have to only possess chords that are diatonic!! Who spreads this misinformation?! Playing an F chord after shows that the key would indeed be F major, not that that is ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 193k
4 votes

Does melody come from root progressions?

It's definitely not always the root. For an example, consider this: This is the verse of Imagine by John Lennon. If you look for chords whose root is featured in the melody, you'll find two: the Dmi (...
Divizna's user avatar
  • 2,504
4 votes

A Question on Chord Progression

We get similar questions frequently. There's no such thing as 'written in X harmonic minor'. Simply it's 'written in X minor'. That means that the ^3 is flattened compared with the ^3 in the parallel ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 193k
4 votes
Accepted

Why Bb7#9 in 'Michelle' and not Bbm7?

If we listen to the recording version (where the backing vocal in the mix is more audible) and look at what they are singing in this score, for the 2nd chord after the F, the backing vocal sings Bb7 ...
GratefulDisciple's user avatar
4 votes

Chord progressions without the tonic chord: same key or different?

if you choose the C major key, and start a chord progression with a chord other than the tonic chord, OR the tonic chord does not even appear in the progression, how do you know that you are still in ...
piiperi Reinstate Monica's user avatar
4 votes

How to pronounce chord progressions

Everyone I've spoken to about chord progression, including rock musicians and college professors, pronounces the Roman numeral name. So, I is the "one chord", ii is the "two chord",...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
4 votes

Ice-cream chords- where does the name come from?

A Google book search found this quote in Songwriting for Dummies (Jim Peterik, ‎Dave Austin, ‎Cathy Lynn, 2020): G, E minor, C, and D are often called "ice cream changes" because this chord ...
Kelvin Sherlock's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

What is the theory behind this chord progression with two chords from the minor scale of the same key?

It's modal interchange. Bb is bVI and C is bVII, both borrowed from D minor. Maybe one could think of D7 as of V/iv and then bVI substituting iv? See also: Is there a name for this cadence? (bVI bVII ...
user1079505's user avatar
  • 16.7k
3 votes

Adding a fourth chord in a 2-5-1 chord progression

Yes, you can modify it. In fact, one of the principle ideas of music is repetition with variation, so your intuitive desire to modify the progression makes sense to me. Categorical approach with new ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar

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