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2

The vii row of your chart will be o (diminished) | m7b5 (half-diminished) | m7b5b9 | m11b5b9 | m11b5b9b13 The remaining chords are correct. Substitutions depend on context, but as a general statement, yes, you can add or remove chord extensions/alterations as you see fit. Notice also that extended chords "contain" other chords. ...


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Since it looks like you’re on your way back to G I think the way to go is to play a D7, a good ol’ V7 chord. What do you think? I think it works well because you modulated to D for a bit then the I chord becomes the V chord back to your original key.


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A great deal depends on your you're voicing the chords. Here are a few options. My personal favorite: F#7 (or just F#, if you're trying to stick to triads). X:0 T:Chord progression idea K:none M:none L:1/1 "^G"[GBd] "^Bm/F#"[^FBd] "^F#m"[^FA^c] "^A"[EA^c] | "^D"[^FAd] "^Bm/F#"[^FBd] "^F#m&...


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If this is a straightforward C chord = C major scale, D chord = D major scale I suppose we COULD think of it as a repeated series of modulations, though I wouldn't see this as being particularly useful. It could be all in C Lydian, as @user1079505 suggested. What does the melody do? ADDITION: You seen to have confirmed this hypothesis in your comment. So ...


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A chord progression is not necessarily in any key. They key is in your head and it's defined by where you imagine the tonic to be and if the tonic is a minor or major chord. The chord progression you gave could be used in different keys, at least G and D, why not even A. You can affect the feeling of a key not only with chords but melodies. I made two ...


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If the song resolves to C, it suggests it is in the key of C major. Then there are several possibilities. One is that the song bases on C lydian scale (c d e f# g a b). In this case D is simply a diatonic chord built on the second step, and it emphasizes the characteristic tone of raised fourth of the scale, that is f#. If the song however doesn't base on ...


2

Bm-D-G-G The roots by descending fifth at D to G and the holding of G for two bars certainly sets up G as a tonic and then you get iii V I I. But, there is a potential ambiguity. One way to "check" things is pick another diatonic minor chord for the starting chord, step through the changes and see if the root changes and chord qualities are ...


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Looking at it from a different perspective, you could easily be in Bm. All three chords belong there too. If you wanted, the next chord would be F♯ - the V of Bm. It could lead into a middle section. Bm, D and G all belong to key D as well, so there's lots of options here. And bear in mind that there's absolutely no law that says you must play everthing ...


0

It's all diatonic in G major. All in the ballpark. What's the bass line do? Playing roots, B, D, G, it outlines the tonic triad of G major. Or the bass could go B, A, G - a scale is always strong, particularly one leading to the tonic. Don't feel you have to force it all into a 'cycle of 5ths' pattern (though there's the obvious V - I in there). ...


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The interpretation of iii-V-I in G Major is a fair one. The iii chord can serve as a stand-in for the tonic chord. It's not a progression one studies at conservatory, but certainly doesn't violate any rules -- and sounds good, rules or no. The progression has some nice potential, too, in that you could easily shift to B minor without changing the progression....


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You are not naive and your choice of key is a good one for this. There are plenty of examples of this type of progression and the Bmin is a very interesting chord in this context for the following reason(s): The iii chord is a viable substitution or extension of the I chord. from poly chord theory the I + iii makes a I maj7. The iii chord is the relative ...


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This quiz probably is from a book chapter where the chapter surely must make clear what the point of the quiz is. But just looking at the root movements, almost everything is roots by descending fifth: V7/II II-7 V7 Imaj7 and harmonic sequence V7/IV IVmaj7, V7 I. So E7 V7 Imaj7 treated as all descending fifths would be V7/V V7 Imaj7 or E7 A7 Dmaj7. fill in ...


2

The arrows indicate secondary dominant chords, as evident in mm3-4 where V7/ii leads to ii, and in mm7-8 where V7/IV leads to IV. Given that, we have: E7 = V7/V, because of the arrow leading to a V7 chord. E7 is the dominant chord of A, so the chord following E7 is A7. Similarly, since A7 is indicated as a V chord, and a I(maj7) chord follows, the latter ...


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I V covers 5 of 7 tones in major keys: ^1 ^3 ^5 ^7 ^2. To get the missing ^4 ^6 use either IV or ii. To play that in basic minor key harmony just make the subdominant minor or the supertonic diminished as iv or iio respectively. But, harmony in minor is a bit more complicated that than, because ^6 ^7 can be in either "lowered" or "raised" ...


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In basic music theory, there is something called "chord leading" that discusses which chords naturally lead to other chords in a progression and sound generally acceptable. Using chord leading, we can create chord progressions that include chords based on each scale degree in major, minor, and pentatonic scales and have them sound musical. Knowing ...


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The falling fifths that Albrecht is good. Another possibility is one of the many "rule of the octave" suggestions. These are exercises with the bass ascending then descending an octave, both major and minor settings. The recommend chords are good for short scale segments with a given bass. https://wayback.archive-it.org/org-1018/20170928202539/http:...


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Try the chordprogression of falling fifths and raising fourths along the circle of fifths like starting at C: F#-B-E-A-D-G-C and continue the flat direction F-Bb-Eb-Ab-Db-Gb => F# the same with V7 chords the same with ii-V and ii7-V7 like e.g. f#7-B7-e7-A7-d7-G7 exchange the minor and major chords: b7-E7-a7-D7 ... play chromatic downward V7 chords (each ...


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If you mean playing the scale from tonic up to octave tonic, the best fit chords will be those which contain the actual note you're on at that moment. So an obvious start point will be the tonic chord, either major or minor. If we're considering simple triads, then on the second note, there will be three choices, minimum.. Let's take the scale of C major. ...


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I'm wondering if there is a theory behind it. Most tonal harmony theories deal with this kind of progression or transformation. Is there a genre where this is used more often? This is way common. Any style with non-obvious harmony (with this I mean not only 3 or 4-chord music) will feature some changes like that. Probably, in your example, we're in F major (...


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The main theory idea is borrowed chords where chords from the parallel key substitute chords in the given key. The letter of the chord roots stays the same - its spelling with accidentals can change - but the chord quality changes. Ex. In F major the diatonic chord of the sixth scale degree is vi (D minor) the chord borrowed from the parallel minor is bVI (D ...


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The only true theory concept is harmonic function and how a chord generally feel in a particular key (in relation to a tonic basically), in your case FMaj F (tonic) - A7? - Bb (subdo) - Bbm? You can actually not play A7 and Bbm cause their function is only to introduce next chords or extend previous chord , they are not rooted in the key, they are ...


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