Skip to main content

New answers tagged

1 vote

What Chord Progression is This?

Thinking enharmonically, D♭m7 > Fm7 > B♭7 >E♭ makes a lot more sense. Personally, having played this for 60 yrs, I can't figure out where that sequence would (could) come in Save the Last ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 195k
0 votes

what scale is used for solo over bIIIMaj7 when approaching II-7?

In this particular case you can superimpose the two seventh chords and that just happens to give you a diatonic scale. C: bIIIMaj7 = Eb G Bb D II-7 = D F A C Ordered by step ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
1 vote

What is going on theory-wise with this passage of music?

C - Bb - Cm - F/A - Eb/Bb - - F/A - Bb - Cm/G - - Bb/F - Gm - C You're working with C as tonic. I think you can make a case for Bb becoming tonicized in the middle of the passage. The progression F/A ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
0 votes
Accepted

What is going on theory-wise with this passage of music?

Okay, so apparently the entire passage except for the C Major chords is in C Dorian. Updated version of this part: C - Bb - Am7(b5) - F - Eb/Bb - - F/A - Bb - Cm/G - - Bb/F - Gm - C In relative ...
jcfiggy's user avatar
  • 21
2 votes

Isn’t the root progression or chord progression of a song meant to anchor in a foundation for rest of the instruments to experiment over?

You posted a lot of statements rather than questions. Here is one comment and one answer: Classical on the other hand, the progressions may switch a lot more. Some. But, a lot doesn't use much ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
1 vote

Isn’t the root progression or chord progression of a song meant to anchor in a foundation for rest of the instruments to experiment over?

Yes, if you had to use just one thing as the harmonic foundation, it would probably be the bass line. But just C in the bass doesn't tell us whether it's C major or C minor (or C7, Cm7, Cm7b5, C9(#11)...
Laurence's user avatar
  • 94.3k
1 vote

What is going on theory-wise with this passage of music?

It appears that rather than Mixolydian, the song flips between the parallels - C major and C minor. This is quite a common occurrence, and does work well, as the root stays the same - C.
Tim's user avatar
  • 195k
2 votes
Accepted

bVI -> I which mode do I treat the bVI

Modal interchange is assumed to be major/minor unless there's a compelling reason to believe otherwise. Given the chord progression I IV bVI I IV, minor would be the clear initial interpretation.
Aaron's user avatar
  • 91.3k
0 votes

Does the rule regarding consecutive octaves/fifths actually hold any weight?

It holds water for common practice era music, and is more strongly observed for "Church" music and vocal music, less so in some secular/instrumental music. When you're trained in the voiced ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
1 vote

How can you listen and judge where you are in the music whilst improvising?

There is a lot of good information in all of these answers but reading the many suggestions and tips can be overwhelming. I have a short and simple answer for you that is not technical and will ...
John Belzaguy's user avatar
1 vote

How can you listen and judge where you are in the music whilst improvising?

A new answer is clearly needed, because you asked this four years ago in 2020, but now in 2024 the same problem persists and you asked about the exact same problem again (in a question that quickly ...
piiperi Reinstate Monica's user avatar

Top 50 recent answers are included