New answers tagged

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I didn’t know the term borrowed chord before I came on this SE site, but I knew and practiced the minor subdominant from jazz and pop songs and also the major IV in the dorian scale or the major V of harmonic minor tunes. I was also familiar with the mediants that are called here parallel chords. The major II was a variant of the minor ii, the major bVII ...


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I am learning about borrowed chords and all explanations state it's done in conjunction with a parallel key. Why? Because that's what "borrowed chords" are, chords from the parallel key. It's literally just a definitional statement. But why did they do that? I can take a few guesses, but you need to understand the truth is "because they ...


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Also, although this answer might be kind of redundant, for example in C major, the melodic tones have this support: C: root of C, third of a, fifth of F D: 5/G E: 3/C, 5/a F: 1/F G:1/G,5/C A: 1/a B: 3/G So 1,3,5,1&3,1&5,3&5,1&3&5 and {} are all represented in the seven tones --- this is exactly the subset content of 2^3 If you include the ...


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Think of it this way. If you’re writing a vaguely classical thing in C major and to round off a phrase you use the chord sequence C Am D7 G then the f-sharp in the D7 is a chromatic alteration needed to temporarily tonicise or modulate to G major. This is not modal borrowing - the D major chord is not alluding to C Lydian. If you instead decide to end your ...


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Composers already use your first example of "borrowing" plenty of times. They just don't call that borrowing from a parallel key. Chords like F♯-A-C-E in C major are called secondary dominants. Due to using the leading tone of the dominant of the home key, they strongly tend to resolve to the dominant. They can be found in Baroque music, so I ...


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Modulations or the movement from one key to another is common because music makes us move. There is a reason dance and music has a unavoidable connection. If it's when you go to a rock-concert and feel the stack of Marshall's pump air against your chest or whether you are emotional touched by a Chopin's nocturne, all music leads to movement. Modulations is ...


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Bit of a strange question - why do they matter? It's a straightforward move from one parallel key to its partner. Same root, same P4, same P5. It changes the mood without having to move very far for all instruments - if they use the maj/min equivalents. But that's not that often. The listener feels where 'home' is, and that is static. It's only the mode of ...


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Allowing your transcription is correct, then yes, the progression is IV-I-II-V. However, since the II chord has a raised third (B-natural rather than B-flat), it would be better written as IV-I-V/V-V. V/V (read: five of five) means that chord functions as a dominant chord relative to the following C chord. This is called a "secondary dominant". The ...


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SUMMARY Follow @Tim's advice and get "that information into your head" without the Chord Wheel. @Alvaro GV is correct about how the Chord Wheel works. MORE The Quick Start Guide for the Chord Wheel focuses almost entirely on major keys. Minor (and other modes) are discussed on the last page in very little detail. The explanation for minor is that ...


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Here’s what you do: put the minor Key you want in the square directly above And to the right of the KEY Square. For example if you want the chords for the key of Aminor, place Am in the square I mentioned. As you can see C is in the KEY square and the chords are the same as C major


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Here's my beginner answer, based on only common sense, not knowledge of Japanese music, except what I could quickly find on English web pages. How to make chords from a scale - by combining notes from the scale. And I'll assume one of the notes is a bass note, so for "chord progression" purposes we'll differentiate between chords containing the ...


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It's not a move to minor, just temporarily borrowing the G-Flat. The whole sequence functions as predominant. In order the chord sequence functionality is: The first chord Fm11 (diatonic minor ii-11) The second chord Abm9 is a borrowed iv-9 from the parallel minor. Move to vi (Cm) is a bit unexpected, but it continues the pattern of jumping up a third in ...


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You've basically got it. Here are several small corrections: m15: The D in the bass is a passing tone, but the chord stays on Cm throughout m21: B diminished triad. I don't hear a G in this chord at all m22: G major, without the 7th. Basically the F from the previous bar steps up to a G, while the bass steps down, but nothing else moves Also I'd lean towards ...


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The passage quoted is a prolonged predominant. We're in the key of Eb major, of which the I chord immediately precedes the chords in question. ii (Fm), iv7 (Abm7) (borrowed from Eb minor), and vi (Cm) all serve as predominant chords, easily moved between because of their shared tones. From Cm the remaining chords arise from a chromatically descending bass ...


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My amateur speculation with lots of secondary dominants: Fm Abm7 Cm might be iv-V-i in C minor (Abm7 is similar to G7) I think Bb should be Eb (inversion), I don't hear a D natural in the chord Cm Eb Am7b5 might be ii-V in Bb (Am7b5 is similar to F7, and you can think of the Bb note in the Eb chord as just a passing tone from the C in Cm to the A in F7) So ...


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a very common progression: Yesterday (Beatles) I (ii7b5 V7)/vi The song is in Eb. Do you mean the passage I - ii - iv? Eb Fm Abm (Abm = minor subdominant) I don’t think that there’s really an a minor chord in it. This could be a chromatic passing chord V- bV - IV: (Bb - Bbb - Ab) Now I’ve found may be a quite correct chord sheet where you can see after the ...


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I teach Celtic guitar for a living and could waffle about this subject all day, but I'll try and be brief! As previous posters have said, Celtic music as it is played today is written in the following modes, in order of precedence: Ionian (major scale) Dorian (optimistic minor- compared to the major scale it has ♭3 and ♭7) Mixolydian (blues-y major with a ♭7)...


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A chord progression is simply the movement of one chord to another chord. The study of chords and chord progressions is called harmony. To some degree harmony analysis focuses on the roots of chord so you also hear the term root progression used in a way more or less synonymous with chord progression. A single chord has expressive potential. In simple, ...


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Can I mix the natural and harmonic minor scales in the same song? Yes. It's helpful to think of "minor" as a collection of options rather than a single scale you have to commit to. Natural minor (Aeolian) is the "true" minor according to the key signature, and Harmonic minor and Melodic minor are representations of how composers modify ...


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In classical harmonic theory, there is only the minor mode. The three (or so) "scales" are common usages within that mode. Most pieces (songs, symphonies, etc.) use all forms of scale within the same piece. As noted by user107905, if it sounds good, it's good. Theory comes into play when you cannot find something good (and presents ideas that one ...


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If it sounds good, it's good There is no rule forbidding you to change the scale in your song. In fact in jazz songs scales can change very often and they still can sound good and melodic. To understand what's happening in your example, I'd point that G#o triad notes come from the E7 chord, which is a dominant in the key of Am. Dominant chords often use all ...


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In music, "is X possible?", where X is anything, the answer will always be YES. You can do anything in music. All rules are made to be broken. Your example is simple, all chords belong to C major scale. Nothing's shocking.


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If you play the natural chords in the key of C, you get: C / Dm / Em / F / G / Am / Bdim / C If you sing the scale doh re mi ... (C D E ...) along with this sequence you will see that it fits. Your sequence seems to be based on the key of C. You use chord 4 (F), chord 1 (C), chord 1 (C 1st inversion), chord 3 (Em) So yes, it is absolutely fine although a ...


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How to find out chords: Listen to the sounds Identify 7 notes from a scale Focus on the Bass (lowest note). 99% of the time it will be the root of the chord Sometimes we need a jazzy approach if the chord has 4+ notes


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If you have no ear training to recognize the chord progression of a simple song you must play and listen to even more elementary chord progressions. This basics will be the elements and modules with which you will build other songs, your own progressions and identify the chords of any song. Look up for songs typing just some roman numbers like “I vi IV V ...


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When you bring up "functional harmony" and "major dominant" in minor those are concepts from common practice style harmony, so-called "classical" music. But these are the conventions of that particular style. While they are normal in that style they aren't required in other styles. A progression like i - v - VII - iv reminds me ...


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Em, Am, C, D The melody uses notes from G major scale


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Since you know the melody and the bass notes, I think your best bet is to infer the chords from those two voices. At minimum, given a bass note and the melody that goes with it, you should be able to figure out by ear, or with a little experimentation, whether the basic harmony is major or minor. Assuming as a starting point that each chord is a basic major ...


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After all that mess I made previously, guess I finally understood your doubt, Jordan. Beg my pardon. Let's analyse your chord progression note by note: Am: A, C, E Em: E, G, B G: G, B, D Dm(maj7): D, F, A, C# As we hear chord by chord, we get an expectation that is not fullfilled on the 4th chord. The Am and Em chords give us five notes that points towards ...


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To add a bit to the other answers, the minor dominant is fine in a minor (or major) key. The pattern v-i does not have the same cadential effect as V-i. Many composers use v rather than V in non-cadential progressions; one example is a repeated cycle of fifths in a minor key. One often sees i-iv-VII-III-VI-ii0-v-i-iv-VII-III-VI-ii0-V7-i. For that matter, ...


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You can use anything. In music, all rules are made to be broken. Analysing you chord progression, they have all 7 notes of the C Major Scale. So, yes, it makes sense theoretically. If you want to stay 100% on A Minor Scale, change the G notes for G#. The chord progression will be this: Am, E, E/G#, Dm Where E/G# is the first inversion of E Major chord.


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Firsttly, get rid of the notion that there's a natural minor key. There isn't. There are minor scales, including the natural minor, but a minor key can and does have several different incarnations. It's probably more common to have the dominant chord in a minor key as a major (or dominant seventh), but there's nothing wrong with using the minor chord in its ...


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You seem to have decided that the G must be a G# because the piece is in the key of A harmonic minor. However, there is no such key as "A harmonic minor." Harmonic, melodic, and natural refer to scales, not keys. Nobody writing functional harmony in the common practice period stuck consistently to the notes of any one of those scales when writing ...


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The concept here is Modal. I think it came into jazz with Ahmad Jamal, but Miles Davis made it the center of his Kind Of Blue album. It entered rock with the Butterfield Blues Band's East/West. Compare a standard chord progression as an obstacle course: the chord changes, the challenge changes, and you as an improviser must adapt. The toughest chordal ...


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Here are some ideas that stay within C maj / A min: moving to G; moving to F; moving to Emin; and two ways to move to Dmin. X:0 T:Esus4 -> G K:none M:none L:1/2 [EAB] [DGB] X:0 T:Esus4 -> F K:none M:none L:1/2 [EAB] [FAB] [FAc] X:0 T:Esus4 -> Emin K:none M:none L:1/2 [EAB] [EGB] X:0 T:Esus4 -> Dmin (#1) K:none M:none L:1/2 [EAB] [FAd] X:0 T:...


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You can 'un-sus' it to E or E7, the dominant of A minor. It's quite pretty to go C, Esus, E7, Asus, Am, Dsus, D7, G ... Or do the same thing WITHOUT 'un-sussing', a string of 'cycle of 5ths sus chords that DON'T resolve. You can do the 'constant structure' thing, which basically means that if you keep the same chord shape (guitarists will typically do ...


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Laurence answered this. I'd just add that the "chord of suspense" is not E or E7 because this piece is modal, in A Aeolian, not in A minor.


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We hear the first G chord as ♭VII of A minor. The second one follows a string of C major chords and feels like V of C major. Yes, it's interesting what a big difference the context makes.


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Inversions are largely up for grabs, except when they aren't! And the places where they aren't are where you're likely to find a slash chord symbol. Here's two ways of ending 'The Saints' (the cliche @Albrecht Hügli was referring to in his answer, I think.) With slash chords and without. Play what you like! But you deserve to be offered the ...


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what I should do when I'm playing a piece that contains both slash cords and non-slash cords. Fake books normally don't contain original arrangements or compositions. Like the editor or arranger has supposed to play a chord in root position or a slash chord (which might be an inversion - s. the comment by Tom) it is always up to you as improviser to play ...


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