New answers tagged

0

In key A♭, V>I is E♭>A♭. You have all three notes of the A♭ triad in bar 2, but bar 1 isn't an E♭ triad. There's a couple of E♭ notes in the bass clef, the lower of which makes the potential chord in root position, but the treble clef is awry! The E♭ triad needs E♭, G and B♭. the latter two will go in either order on the treble clef. I guess you're ...


0

The V chord in Ab major is Eb major; however, the chord written in m. 1 is A diminished. Rewrite the first chord as Eb major, and you'll have it. The error message you're getting is letting you know that you're missing the third of the expected chord.


3

Your assessment is right, so is the voicing you wrote. It is a G13 chord (7,9,13) and it is a substitute dominant chord for C#7 going to F#m7. The strong G root, presence of the B and F notes in the chord and the function to the F#m leaves no doubt in my mind that it is a G dominant chord and not a slash or inversion chord. I think quartal voicing is pretty ...


-3

Yes, it's a substitution, but it's not G9add13, it's A7/G, or better, A7sus2/G.


2

V7-I or V7-i (as mentioned in other answers) has developed over time as a very strong resolution. There are several intervallic movements happening simultaneously. Most of these evolved over time. (Using octave equivalency), there are simultaneous half and whole step movements to the tonic, 7-8 and 2-1; this comes from the medieval expansion of a major sixth ...


3

When I first read this question, I assumed that by vi dim you mean the diminished triad built on the raised sixth degree of the scale (for example, F♯-A-C in A minor). But then I read your description: vi dim->i has 3 half-step (one down, two up) movements That implies that you're asking about the chord F-A♭-C♭. But you're not really asking about that ...


2

As far as I understand your question correct you mean with vi dim the dim seventh chord of the 6th degree which is actually the vii dim si,ti,re,fa, and dominant substitution (V7 or Vb9). This is considered as a rootless V7 chord. The root would be the fifth (=dominant) of the tonic and has a strong tendency to resolve to the tonic. What I actually ...


2

In addition to Richard's reply I would add that in traditional classical harmony some bass progressions are considered strong and some weaker. The bass descending a 5th - e.g. G descending to C in the key of C or C minor is considered the strongest progression. The diminished chord on the flattened sixth has no such strong bass progression. Now we are a few ...


8

It all depends on how you define the "strongest" resolution. If you're looking for minimal movement between the two chords, then there are chords other than V7 that move more smoothly to I. But this voice-leading proximity is not what has made V7–I the de facto cadential resolution in Western art music. Rather, it's an outgrowth of several ...


3

There's an early example in a treatise on rasguedo for Spanish guitars; this treatise was written by Joan Carles Amat about 1595 or so. It does show how to move guitar accompaniments around the cycle of fifths. Some things are not so clear; the harmonic organization is in terms of 8 modes rather than major and minor scales. Joan does use both root position ...


2

I think the question is: Why didn‘t musicians or editors doubt that Caccini was the Composer of this Ave Maria. I thought one premise must be the well tempered tuning, but: The Circle of Fifths was invented by Nikolai Diletskii in his late 1670's treatise on composition called the Grammatika. In 1728, Johann David Heinichen improved upon the design to ...


0

It's not a matter of bad or good practice. It's a matter of being aware if something sounds good or not. Or let's say, it's a matter of figuring out what will sound best in a given situation. Having the same root note as the bass may very well what sounds best in that moment, and if it is, go for it. To find out, try different inversions (different positions)...


1

Playing a different note "on the bottom" than what the bass is playing potentially adds interest to the part (especially if it is a passing note on the way to somewhere else) but it will be heard as an error if it is dissonant. But playing the same note on the bottom as the bass player is not always a good idea because you are stepping on the ...


1

This progression lends itself to a variety of interpretations, all similar, but varying in technical detail. This progression, even more so than others, is highly dependent on context -- chord voicings, melody, and what happens before and after. ii7 - i (F#7b5 - E minor) ii moving to i as a cadence does not itself have a specific name. However, it is related ...


4

If that's a rule, then it's very frequently broken! You don't NEED to play a note that the bass is already playing. And there doesn't HAVE to be all the notes of a chord present.


3

As John says, most sequences aren't named, and this is no different. Also, B♭ and E♭ are more appropriate. Let's put it into RN. Starting on B♭, call that the key. I>IV. V/V>V. V/vi>vi. Taking us to the relative minor of B♭ - Gm. Then a common turn-around, either IV>V>I or ii>V>I. Could almost call it the 'Do-Re-Mi sequence', as that's ...


4

If your progression is Am7 to Bm7 and you want to avoid playing the roots you can just omit the roots on the 6th string for those chords. I believe that was the intent of the lesson you recall. You shouldn’t play C to D7, that is a completely different progression. The C chord with A in the bass might be ok depending on the voicing you choose but a D7 with ...


5

Am7 contains exactly the same notes as C6. Bm7 contains exactly the same notes as D6. Seems that there's a possibility the last two chords, rather than Am7 and Bm7, are C6 and D6. hence the bass feels more at home there. However, that's not, I suppose, the question! There's no real 'bad practice' when playing bass and guitar and voicings. The bass, pretty ...


5

It’s better to think of the first two chords as flats, Bb and Eb since the key is Bb in both songs. Also each 2 bar segment actually ascends in 4ths, not 5ths, although they do descend in 5ths, the inverse interval of 4ths. There is no name for this progression I’m aware of, chord changes don’t often have names with some exceptions like “blues” and some ...


5

I second @Richard's comment that it's a poor definition. Here is some evidence from other textbooks than AP Barron's. In Steven G. Laitz's The Complete Musician (which uses the "phrase model" mentioned by @Richard), retrogression is defined as follows: a backward motion [such as] from D to PD [dominant to predominant] is called a retrogression.1 ...


7

Interesting. I think the problem lies in a pretty poor definition. As you've said, there are all kinds of ways to understand "intensity," so it's not hard to come up with examples that seem to defy the definition. It seems that they mean "intensity" as something like "tendency to resolve towards tonic," but presumably the tonic ...


1

As well as Richard's explanation; there are possible parallel fifths and octaves in moving V to IV in root position; one can easily go move from V6 to IV6 though. Most stepwise motions of 63 chords are fine


2

Your intuition is exactly right on all fronts! Yes, ii not moving to I in this style is similar to the guideline forbidding V moving to IV. Since ii has predominant function, it wants to move to the dominant (hence "predominant," or "before the dominant"). Moving to I bypasses this dominant function and confuses the role of this ii chord....


1

The notes themselves are G♯ A B C D E F♯, which is the Super Locrian mode of A minor. The 'altered scale' That gives a basic triad of G♯ B D and F♯. Making G♯m7♭5. A very close relative of Bm6! Also containing the main, useful notes of E9. That's why V works well. As ever, using the chord tones on the emphasised parts of the bar work best.


1

Whether you think in terms of 'avoid notes' or wrap it up in modal phraseology there's still a basic principle that if a scale is going to 'go' with a chord, it shouldn't fight with the note that defines the quality of that chord, the 3rd. 'In a functional harmony way' perhaps you just have to accept that these two chords AREN'T particularly connected.


1

Now that we have an accepted answer, I can add my own opinion. Even if it's Emaj7 - Em7 - A7 - A7 (and not Emaj7 - Em7 - A), I hear this as a mode-mixing soul groove which moves around B major and B minor. A cheesy ending chord would be B major.


1

Based on your comment on the timing and having A7 instead of just A I hear it as E tonality, parallel major and minor. The A7 is more of a IV chord rather than having a dominant function, kind of like the IV chord in a blues. As to why it sounds good, who can say? Maybe it’s going from happy to sad to bluesy. I personally like it a lot and it’s a time tested ...


5

yet they are complex and mysterious and rich Um, no, not the first two. They're entirely appropriate to the song, which is the key part. That's not about chord progressions though - it's much more about fingerpicking and strumming patterns. This may lead to some effect of inversions if you look at the theory, but that only derives from standard picking ...


1

It looks like you have modulated. The E Maj7 would typically belong to either E or B. A is the 4th of E, if E was serving as the 5th of A I'd expect E7 and not E Maj7. It is common to resolve from the 4th to the key by going to the 4-minor. So the E Maj7 --> E-7 in my ear would make me expect to hear B, rather than A. But if what you played sounds ...


2

There is no one key for that progression. It could obviously be E, or A, but with nothing else around - before or after, it's impossible to tell. Just in isolation, a way to give a clue is to let one chord ring out, and make it sound like the final one. If it does, then as far as you're concerned, that's the key. Inconclusive? Read from the start again...


4

As others suggested, the best way is to immerse in his songs, of course by listening, but I would add also "with paper and pencil", to study the chord progressions. I did that a few years ago, and it's interesting. With time you notice a few patterns "Oh this is interesting". Since you cite Don't think twice it's alright, I think you ...


6

First thing that comes to mind is that Dylan can go off the chords you'd expect in any key. First example is actually a song he covers but didn't write, "Baby Let Me Follow You Down". G F Baby let me follow you down C Eb Baby let me follow you down G D C D I'll do anything in ...


10

The best way to start is by learning all of the Dylan songs you like. Transcribe them or if that's too hard at the beginning try to find transcriptions that other people have made. Once you have digested Dylan's harmonic language you'll probably come up with ideas to develop it in a different direction, and finally you'll develop you own personal voice.


Top 50 recent answers are included