New answers tagged

2 votes

Is adapting existing melodies a useful way to improve composition skill?

What I'd like help with is advice on whether adapting old melodies will improve composition skills and maybe lead to something more 'original' in the long run. Yes, but compositional skill is the ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
1 vote

Is adapting existing melodies a useful way to improve composition skill?

From my experience observing others, rearranging others' music does not improve compositional skills in the long term. For every Gooseworx, insaneintherainmusic, or RichaadEB who eventually figures ...
Dekkadeci's user avatar
  • 14.1k
1 vote

Is adapting existing melodies a useful way to improve composition skill?

I'd suggest you work on improving the tunes that you write. Study tunes that you like and see if you can identify what it is about them that makes them effective. You say you're following the changes -...
Brian THOMAS's user avatar
  • 11.6k
2 votes

Is adapting existing melodies a useful way to improve composition skill?

The composers considered to be the greatest of all time did this extensively. Of course they also did come up with original melodies, but I think you’ll find if you adapt enough existing melodies it ...
Todd Wilcox's user avatar
  • 56.7k
5 votes

Is adapting existing melodies a useful way to improve composition skill?

Adapting old melodies will most definitely improve compositional skills. Preexisting music that gained appreciation basically gives you insight into what makes a melody great. The whole process of ...
Jarek.D's user avatar
  • 1,345
2 votes

Is adapting existing melodies a useful way to improve composition skill?

Depends what you mean by "steal". If you're asking whether it's acceptable to write new lyrics for an existing melody, then yes. Writing new lyrics to existing melodies is quite a common ...
Divizna's user avatar
  • 2,504
0 votes

Can secondary dominant come after target chords?

You example seems like a jazz/pop case, but in "classical" style you can have secondary dominants after their associated tonic chords. In Gjerdingen's Music in the Galant Style he shows ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
1 vote

Can chords found in parallel modes of the relative minor of a key (or relative major when in a minor key) be considered borrowed chords?

I gave the song a listen, and I did not hear the progression OP named, but I did hear a guitar solo with the chords (4:11 below) C-F-G-A, C-F-G-A where the phrasing ...
Mirlan's user avatar
  • 1,796
1 vote

Can secondary dominant come after target chords?

This is really an abuse of Roman numeral notation. Although there are back-relating dominants, as pointed out by @Mirlan, that's not what's happening here. Calling it V/VI- serves a practical purpose ...
Aaron's user avatar
  • 88k
0 votes

Can secondary dominant come after target chords?

Yes, a secondary dominant can in some cases "back-relate" to its preceding tonic. A good example is Schubert's song "Mein!", where the chords (once the voice enters) go I-V7-ii-V7/...
Mirlan's user avatar
  • 1,796
0 votes

Can secondary dominant come after target chords?

Based on the comments, I'd say it's a V7/III followed by III. In general, any major or minor chord may be preceded by its "dominant" without disturbing the local tonality. In this case, the ...
ttw's user avatar
  • 25.4k
4 votes

Ice-cream chords- where does the name come from?

A Google book search found this quote in Songwriting for Dummies (Jim Peterik, ‎Dave Austin, ‎Cathy Lynn, 2020): G, E minor, C, and D are often called "ice cream changes" because this chord ...
Kelvin Sherlock's user avatar

Top 50 recent answers are included