New answers tagged

2

Based on your "Also, my ear doesn't seem to care which note is in the base." statement, I have a feeling that your Am7-hearing problem is not your only such problem. As a result, I highly recommend training yourself to care about what the bass/lowest notes of chords are. For example, how jarring do you find the I6/4 chord in a I-ii-I6/4-V-I chord ...


10

Out of context there's no way to tell if C6 or Am7 is the most useful 'spelling' of this chord. If your ear favours C6, that's fine. Put it in a C, Am7, Dm7, G7 progression and I think you'll hear it one way, put it in D7♭9, G13, C6 I think you'll hear it another.


0

I think you're pretty much stuck with a unison G in the top two parts here. The leading note F♯ badly wants to rise. In a perfect cadence there's the 'fall to the 5th' exemption, in favour of a full final chord, but that's not an option in a V - VI progression. And while I LOVE the astringent quality of an E♭ - F♯ augmented 2nd in a melodic line (and ...


3

You have an augmented second between F♯ and E♭, and so that's the part-writing error that you have present. Moving this F♯ up to G will double the third of that VI chord, as you mentioned. I always teach my students the following in a deceptive/interrupted resolution: the bass and leading tone go up, but everything else goes down. This is the only way to ...


0

I think the idea is that it's not just moving among chords, but it's a fake-out on the V-I resolution, with all that implies. The leading tone-tonic resolution reinforces that. Don't deny the leading-tone it's destiny! :D


1

With its formula of 4 notes, A C E G, it could either be called Am7, or C6. Usually, the defining factor is the lowest note - that in the bass. Hearing the A lowest, Am7, hearing the C lowest, C6. This isn't always going to be the case, though, so where it comes in the sequence will be a contributory factor. In fact, that in itself is a decision the writer ...


3

Actually, why would we want to force you to hear things differently than you do? It's your hearing, your sensitivity and you need to work with it, not against it. The only difference between Am7 and C6 is where you hear the root of the chord, is it A or C? This may depend on many things, including inversion and voicing, timbre of the instrument and context. ...


3

Yes, ii can absolutely go to V43! The main trick will not be moving between those two chords, but rather moving from I to ii (both in root position) without any parallels. Similarly, I agree with Albrecht: I think IV–V42 is a bit more common. Note, however, that you can replace that IV with ii6 and move just as smoothly to V42. Quite frankly, any use of ...


1

This will be surely possible. Buit if a think just of 2 famous pieces where this could be tried out a) Largo (Handel): I'd prefer II vii6 or b) Bist du bei mir (Bach): ii-ii2-V56 is better. So I think ii-V34 is less common than IV-V2.


0

Em7♭5 keeps us in the tonality of F major/D minor. A B♮ would take the music somewhere it doesn't want to go at that point. The add2 chords are just an artistic decision. You might consider them cheesy, Newman thinks the add to the emotion. Fine, you write your music, he writes his. And the printed chord names are fine. In Fadd2/C the A is as structural ...


2

Em7b5 vs. Em7 The song is temporarily in D minor here. Em7b5 is the ii7 chord in D minor; whereas Em7 is the ii7 chord in D major. D minor is the relative minor of F major, so the Bb has already been prominent in our ear throughout the piece. Fadd2/C vs. F/C The G in this chord is a carryover from the melody G that comes with "hap-py". I interpret ...


2

Why not Bb Major? This is the easier one to explain. The bass line with the given chords comprises a four-note descent: D-C-B-Bb. Using a Bb Major chord, would have two effects. First, the bass line would arrive at Bb "too early", making the overall line less effective. Second, all of the other chords are minor. Having such a starkly "bright&...


2

This scale is more readable in F♯: F♯ G♯ A♯ B C♯ D E♯ F♯. Anyway, this is an unconventional scale. I don't think you will find any conventional chord substitution for something that is unconventional in the basic form. The seventh chord of the fourth scale degree is a minor major seventh chord (ivmΔ7.) Two thoughts about that particular chord on that fourth ...


0

I guess you're making 4-note chords from each degree of the diatonic major scale in key G♭. The first thing to do is make sure all the diatonic names are correct. Looking at G major, it's G A B C D E F♯ G. So every one of those needs to be flattened - importantly, in name. So, we get G♭ A♭ B♭ C♭ D♭ E♭ F ♮, G♭. Please note - not a B or a D anywhere! And - IV ...


1

'How did they know?' Maybe they didn't ! Notice a couple of things. The sequence moves in 4ths, which is a common enough way. Think ii-V-I, used a lot in jazz, but also in lots of other music. The ii sounds like it wants to go to V (1 4th up), which then wants to go to I (another 4th up). So the 4th bar (Fmaj7) would move naturally to B&flat(maj7), and ...


3

You're looking at what is called a "lead sheet". The intention is to provide the melody and basic harmony (chords) of a song. The chords are derived from the originally published song, or, in some cases, the song was composed initially as simply a set of chords with a melody. For example, Miles Davis's "So What" and John Coltrane's "...


3

Probably because the composer wrote that chord when the music was composed. He probably wanted that particular sound or feel related to the melody. So whoever published the sheet music has seen the original music and therefore seen what chords the composer wrote in relation to the melodic line. The colour of the melodic line is closely connected to the ...


3

You could have a cadential six-four chord after a prolongation of the dominant, but in doing so I would argue that in doing so you actually lose the function of that chord as a cadential six-four. Instead, since you've already got scale-degree 5 in the bass, this cadential six-four actually becomes just a pedal six-four that continues to prolong dominant. (...


3

Why "the rule" is "the rule" The danger of preceding a cadential 6-4 with an expanded V chord — especially a V7 chord — is that the C6-4 tends to undermine the tension of the dominant chord and winds up sounding like a I chord. That is, there is a risk that the C6-4 winds up sounding like the resolution of the dominant, rather than a ...


1

Yes. You can work with fragments (samples) of what has come before to build continuations of a musical passage. There is an adage describing music form as "repetition with variation." In part that describes your "sampling earlier sequences" idea. Obviously such sampling would involve repetition, and reassembling various sampled fragments ...


5

In the broadest sense chords and other musical elements serve one main purpose: to express thoughts and feelings. Talking about "purpose" in art is a tricky business. If you try to stay objective about it, you can talk about stability/instability and consonance/dissonance as the dynamic forces in chords and harmony. Those elements give music a ...


10

To understand chords, I find some history helpful. Pre-chord history The earliest Western music we know about is chant. ("Earliest" in this case meaning the first music where we can "connect the dots" to modern music.) In its simplest form, chant is one person singing one pitch at a time: melody, but only melody. Eventually, musicians ...


14

Basically what you're asking is "what is tonality." And the first disclaimer is that hasn't always been "a thing" in Western music, and isn't always in other music-cultures. Just as a "bassline/melody/drums" construct doesn't make sense for Gregorian chant,* neither do "chords" or "chord progressions." First ...


5

I'm thinking of the works of Steve Reich and other minimalists, who were influenced by and exerted significant influence on, DJ genres. "It's Gonna Rain" literally takes a sample and chops it up. And "Clapping Music," while it doesn't actually rearrange its pattern at all, takes a strategy of shifting the sample to start one note later on ...


9

MOTIV-ABSPALTUNG we call this "a split off" from a motif - very common in Baroque, Classic, Romantic and 20th century: e.g. Bach, Beethoven, Bruckner (developping a new theme or phrase), Bartok (especial in the endings of his short piano pieces). In my concern theories (especially of music) shouldn't teach rules but describe what in praxis is ...


4

Actually, I'd challenge the idea that harmony doesn't have much to do with it. When I read the question before watching the video, I assumed the emotive contrast you described would come with a big change in register, orchestration, or dynamics, but all those are pretty consistent between the time points you mentioned. What does change is: "Don't cry ...


2

how about catharsis? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catharsis In addition to Aaron's answer I'd like to focus on three elements: Text and form: Verse-Verse-Refrain: I'd assume that we know the tune of the refrain, and we are longing to hear it finally. The lyrics are touching: don't cry ... and the mother/father-country! (This is a myth in everybodys heart.) ...


3

There's no particular name for what you're hearing, but here are what I interpret as the main contributors: Melody In the part corresponding to the lyrics "Don't cry for me, Argentina" (1:41 – 1:51), the notes move primarily upward. An illustration might look like this: However, in the "All through my wild days" part, the melody moves ...


1

Kostka says "If vii° and V are used next to each other, V will usually follow the vii° because the V is the strongest sound." He suggests vii° to V is the better harmonic progression.


6

Ignore all that noise about "better" or "worse." It's all nonsense. Both chords have been used extensively throughout music since the Baroque. You don't have to window shop to find the best model. You have to decide what you want your voices to do in that cadential moment. If you want to hear a nice bass jump, use a V chord. If you'd ...


5

Measures 9 – 12 Measure 9 and the first two beats of Measure 10 are just one long F major chord. The apparent CM7 is just a passing chord, meaning that it serves the purposes of connecting the harmonies on either side but isn't itself considered as affecting the harmony. The G7/D chord in measure 10 is better analyzed as a Bdim/D chord. It's use here is as a ...


0

Am G F E. Analyzed with Roman numerals it's i VII VI V. It "works" because of the step-wise descenting bass, and it outlines a tonic/dominant pattern i ... V. Those are musical fundamentals, step-wise lines and tonic/dominant harmony. You probably want to consider that i VII VI V and i v6 iv6 V are basically two expressions of the same idea: a ...


Top 50 recent answers are included