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The 'add' modifier is used if a note above the 7th is added to a triad, and if the lower tensions are not part of the chord. That's why there's a difference between a C9 and a C(add9) chord. The first has a (flat) 7th, the other one doesn't: C9 = C E G Bb D C(add9) = C E G D Another usage is to add notes that would otherwise replace another note, as is ...


7

Yes, you could call it G9♭15, but it would be a pointlessly irregular usage of the chord naming conventions that music theorists (mostly) agree upon. So in reality, no one uses that name, not least in part because diminished fifteenths absolutely suck. The notes you name don't really have a standard, agreed-upon chord label, because that chord contains the ...


7

I don't know the video, but normally one uses only 1 instance of each letter. Also (with exceptions), the best guess at a chord comes from considering the notes as stacked thirds. This would give A♭-C-E♭-G as the chord. This an A♭ major seventh. (The same as the OP G# major seventh.) (A G♯ major seventh would be G♯-B♯-D♯-F♯♯, not as easy to write though.) ...


7

First, you find an intelligent name for the set of notes, not something dreamed up either by someone clueless, or with the intension of deliberate obfuscation. You have the notes G#, B#, D, E#. Now respell them as something that looks as if it might be related to C major: Ab, C, D, F. So this is either an F minor 6 chord, or D half diminished seventh. If ...


6

The voicing doesn't usually affect what a chord gets named, although there are slash chords which tell what the chord is, and what note is the lowest - its inversion. If he's calling it Cm♭6, then it won't be spelled with a G♯. G♯ is an augmented 5th. The ♭6 of C is A&flat. As soon as I hear stuff like that that's inaccurate, i ...


6

The difference between C9 and C add9 is that the latter chord doesn't contain the 7th.


5

This chord is called Am maj9 ("A minor major 9"). On a chart it would often be written just a Am maj7, which describes the basic chord quality. The additional tension (9) would be left at the discretion of the musicians. Note that major 7th chords are often written using the triangle symbol Δ. This is also true for minor chords with a major seventh (and a ...


5

True, most chords are clear in their make-up from the name. However, sometimes, there needs to be an extra note added and it's more clear to write that at the end of a chord's name. Csus2, for example, needs C D G, as the sus knocks out the 3rd of the chord, E. But what about if we wanted to have a D note as well? C E G and D. That's where the 'add' part ...


3

“Add” is used in chord symbols in certain cases where the usual assumptions don’t apply. Strictly speaking, a chord with an extension (9, 11, or 13) contains the triad indicated by the note letter (root, third, and fifth), the seventh, the interval of the extension, and all lower extensions. (See here for the complete picture.) A ninth chord has no lower ...


3

A lot of musicians - particularly ones who deal in the sort of music which can usefully have chord symbols (C, Dm, E7, Bm7♭5, E♭maj7♯11 etc.) written above it - base their 'theory' on chord=scale equivalence. See a C major chord, play notes fron the scale of C major. See a C minor chord, play the C minor scale. See E♭maj7♯11 - ...


3

That original question was based on erroneous assumptions. Most of the answers refer to it being questionable. For starters, there are many, many different scales, the well-loved major being only one. Scales are our way to label notes - to pigeon-hole them. It's what humans do, and like to do! It could be argued that chords can be made from notes of any ...


2

I hear the first two chords as a ii7-V7 in Bb and the second pair as IVmaj7-V7 in Db (C# enharmonic). Personally, I can rarely resist adding a ninth to a ii7 and consequently I'm hearing the Gb maj7 as Ebm7-9 (albeit without the Eb bass note). However, that does give a lead as to where to go next. Each pair of chords can be thought of as ii7-9 - V7 with ...


2

As Old Brixtonian hints at in comments, this is simply a chain of suspensions. The primary chords in each bar are V7/IV - ii - cadential 6/4 - V7 - I in E-flat. In the last four bars, the final resolution of the suspensions in the right hand doesn't occur until the third beat in each measure. The first two bars effectively contain a deceptive resolution ...


2

Let me guess: I assume we are in the key of B♭ major, the Cm7-F7 is a ii7-V7 -> cadence in B♭ (at the end of the tune). This means F7 and F#Maj7 are unrelated, they have nothing in common. So this is a "harmonische Rückung" (as we say in German - I'm still looking for the English term.) Modulation B♭ -> D♭ F#Maj7-G# (probably G#7) could be (or will ...


2

Why do something differently? To have variety. Varying things is good in and of itself in music, because it makes things more interesting. Why leave out the fifth? To make room in the voicing. To make things more ambiguous. To use the voices where it makes the biggest impact. Because you like the sound of it? To leave a hole so that you can move the bass ...


2

It’s likely you mean the I is minor, thus i-, bVI, bIII, bVII. This is a very popular progression (turnaround) in disguise. It is the same as vi, IV, I, V when you make the bIII the I. For example, the progression for the verses of Bob Marley’s “Is This Love?” is F#-, D, A, E. The key signature has three sharps which could make the song either in F# ...


2

In real life, anything above a 7th chord must contain that 7th note - be it a major, minor or even diminished seventh. (Augmented don't count here!) So, a 9th chord will basically be 1,3,5,7 and 9. If not, it'll be an 'add9' chord. However, when it comes to 11th and 13th chords, things can get very muddy. Let's face it - a C13 could contain C,D, E, F, G, A ...


1

If we're trying to fit everything into a functional 'cycle of 5ths' system, IV is actually a substitute for ii, V of V. ♭VII 'works' because it has two notes in common with ii. ♭VII7? Well, in a jazz/blues environment, you can add a 7th to just about any chord and it won't sound bad! There are similarities with the 'backdoor progression' ...


1

This is a G♭ triad with added 2 (A♭) and sharpened 4th (C♮). (This is completely independent of any key signature - just like a C major triad is always C, E and G (all naturals) whatever the prevailing key signature.) It's not a chord symbol you'll often see, and yes, I'd expect the 4 to be written above the 2. But it's quite clear. ...


1

First, C9 denotes traditionally a dominant chord: that's C7 with the major 9th. This must resolve somewhere (most standardly to F). Now Cadd9 is a C major triad with the major 9th. This is a major chord which functions as a tonic. You can pretty much always substitute Cadd9 for CMaj9, which is CMaj7 with the major 9th. The former is more "pop", the latter ...


1

The part you circled in red isn't really the chord. It's a non-chord tone device called a suspension. The two chords involved at that moment are E diminished seven (circled in green) and F minor (circled in blue.) Notice how those two chords overlap in time. When the bass goes from E to F the top voices don't change and hold the tones of the E diminished ...


1

But when I hear the term "arpeggio", I don't just think of a broken chord but a very specific broken chord, where everything ascends or descends in order. That seems to be the particular meaning of arpeggio as an embellishment - the wavy line next to a chord... Regarding the meaning for arpeggio for any kind of broken chord, it might be worthwhile to ...


1

Many people will think of a typical arpeggio in piano music as a chord written with a wavy vertical line in front of the chord. In Chopin's Etude Op. 10, No. 11 this is pursued to an extreme degree: But the terms "arpeggio" and "arpeggiated" are also applied in various other ways. Is Alberti bass really a type of arpeggio? Well, Alberti bass is often ...


1

OP: "Does arpeggio really mean any form of broken chord?" Yes. If you have a series of individual notes which when combined make a known chord (i.e. not a scale or "cluster chord") that selection may be described as an arpeggio regardless of sequence. If asked to arpeggiate a chord you might play the notes in order, but you don't have to (the written chord ...


1

All arpeggios are broken chords, but not all broken chords are arpeggios. Like all sparrows are birds, but not all birds are sparrows. Somewhat officially, in exams, broken chords are specified (in early grades), which consist of the notes from chords (mainly triads) played in particular orders, but not directly ascending/descending. Later, arpeggios are ...


1

We would spell this chord differently When naming any chord, we only want one note from each scale degree, so instead of G B D F A F#, we would spell out your chord as G B D F# A E#. Since E# is enharmonic to F, this gives us something like Gmaj9add#13 to notate the augmented 6th/13th when rearranged as G B D F# A E#. But this is awkward, as I don't see #...


1

Context is key! The video is a guitar lesson where the presenter is demonstrating some open campfire voicings that give a spooky effect. In the clip highlighted by the OP, he's showing the basic E minor open voicing, but with the open-b moved up to the c on the first fret. He calls this E minor b6 and demonstrates how to use it to play "Laura Palmer's Theme" ...


1

EDIT: Your question and the linked video really seem like two different issues. You asked about voicings but the guitar lesson video issue is more about identifying a bona fide chord. I think the guitar lesson video is transcribing the music incorrectly. The video's transcription - roughly tones ^5 b^6 ^5 ^1 b^7 ^1 over a complete, root position minor ...


1

Some people insist that chord symbols tell us nothing about voicing or inversion (with the exception of 'slash bass' notation). However, in practice, it can be useful to distinguish between C6 and Am7. And (to be a little more controversial - this one tends to arouse the haters :-) between C(add2) and C(add 9). So, although Cm♭6 (note that's got ...


1

...it sounded quite good to me. You can sort of turn the question around and say something like: 'there aren't any triadic or seventh chord progressions that sound bad." There are simply different functional and non-functional progressions and they all have some expressive potential depending on how they are used. From the aesthetic point of view of '...


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