13

Based on the excerpt shown, I would actually argue for another understanding: Dm7. Since the stem-down D and F are held throughout the entire measure, we can assume they're chord tones unless other information suggests otherwise. Now we have to determine which of the stem-up notes—C, B, and A—are chord tones. In order to do this, we often privilege two ...


6

Certainly not B anything! The B note is short, not on a strong part of the bar, therefore is a passing note. That leaves D, F and A, with a C note left over from the previous bar. Making a pretty sure Dm7. With D as the lowest note, that's preferrable to the only other contender - F6.


6

It is known as tritone substitution. It works because two notes out of the four are the same as two notes from the actual dominant of the next chord played. Let's look at the notes: G (the target chord) has D7 as its dominant. D7 contains D F♯ A and C. Its tritone sub. which is A♭7 contains A♭ C E♭ and G♭. It's always the 3rd and 7th that become 7th and 3rd. ...


6

It's called "tritone substitution". The notes of Ab7 are Ab, C, Eb, Gb (or F#). This chord has two notes that are also present in the secondary dominant of G, ie D7 - C and F# - and Ab and D form a tritone (as do C and F#). Basically one can often replace a secondary dominant by the chord formed on its tritone.


5

The Ab7 chord is considered an Ab augmented sixth chord, spelled [Ab C Eb F#]. The "standard" resolution of that chord would be to [G C E G] followed by G major, but it's acceptable in modern music (i.e., 20th century and later) to just go directly to G major. The key concept behind augmented sixth chords is that the augmented sixth ([Ab-F#] in ...


5

The concept of modal interchange (or "modal borrowing" or "mode mixture") is that you "borrow" a chord quality that is diatonic in the parallel key. If you're in, say, C major, you can borrow chords that are diatonic to C minor (and vice versa). So to find opportunities to borrow diminished triads, let's first find where those ...


3

The general terms for whether two things -- notes or chords -- sound good together are "consonance" (good) and "dissonance" (bad). Since at root this is a question of aesthetics, there's no rule. If you want to follow 19th century musical aesthetics, then any note (let alone chord) you add to one of those basic triads is dissonant, and ...


3

A couple of things you should be aware of, first the Fsus4 shouldn’t be labeled as major since Fsus4 has no 3rd. Also, major chords don’t need to be labeled as maj, C and G is all you need. I agree with Lawrence that this can’t be labeled as any key in particular, to me it mostly wanders around different tonalities every 2 bars, which is totally fine. My ...


3

It does belong to a major mode. It's the Mixolydian mode. G Mixolydian contains all the G major notes with one exception - F♯ gets thrown out in favour of F♮. Clashing with the 'major feeling of the song'? What? There are millions of songs that are ostensibly in major keys, but possess minor chords! Maybe you have the impression that major songs only contain ...


3

Two things: There's no capo in that chord diagram. It's not a C#m7 chord, it is a C#m7 flat five, which makes it an Em6 with C# in the bass. It says "b5" in parentheses. For the life of me I cannot understand why anyone would write it in smaller text and in parentheses, because the flat five makes all the difference and changes the whole meaning ...


3

In the most strict analysis, there are two chords in the measure: both Bdim and Dmin. The initial C is a suspension from the previous measure. It resolves down to the B, forming a brief Bdim chord that immediately proceeds to Dmin. The following C is an anticipation, leading to the Amin in the next measure. Although Bdim is "required" analytically, ...


2

"Everything must be a mode of the major scale" is a very rigid and narrow model of harmony, and it doesn't work when exposed to actual music. Let's relax the concept of mode beyond "modes of the major scale", by making the following additional definitions. I'll call it Real Mode to distinguish it from the narrower idea that's better ...


2

If you look carefully at the chord symbol you'll see the chord is C#m7(b5), so the fifth is flattened (G#->G). The complete chord is C# E G B. You don't need a capo, the diagram shows the notes without a capo. Possibly the chord is intended to sound as D#m7(b5), in which case you'd need to use the capo on the second fret and finger the C#m7(b5) chord as ...


2

I remember that when I didn’t know anything about augmented 6th chords or tritone substitution and borrowed chords I was already playing and experimenting with this progression. Now, beside the given answers I think it’s worth to recall that Ab7-G is borrowed from the parallel key C-minor, and reminds us also on the Andalusian cadence, which everybody has in ...


1

A complete CMaj11(#13) chord is spelled C E G B D F A#, and a C11 (that is, Cdominant11) is spelled C E G Bb D F. So these are not equivalent, because one contains B natural and the other does not. However, it's true that both chords contain the enharmonically equivalent (i.e., they represent the same pitch) A# and Bb. The difference in spelling relates to ...


1

There are several useful substitutions for a chord that can be used to replace the cord or extend the chord. When you do this you are creating a new chord and one term that applies is poly chord. Although your post is NOT guitar specific I'd say one of the best sources of info on poly chords is Chord Chemistry by Ted Greene. In short I'll list a few of the ...


1

With the given material, we can be pretty sure that it clearly is in C, and most certainly in C major. The fact that it begins in C minor is not that indicative of the overall mode, and there's plenty of music that begins with a different mode. There are many clues for this assumption. It's in C because: it begins with a C chord; it returns in C within the ...


1

As you say, there's no one key that contains all those chords. But there's a lot of keys that it definitely ISN'T in :-) There's some C major/C minor. Then some E♭ major (the relative major of C minor).


1

The standard way to annotate chords is to stack the annotations in the same order as the chord pitches. X: 1 T: Solfege for chords M: none K: none L: 3/8 [FB] w:ti w:fa


1

Transposing As mentioned in Tim's answer, CAGED is a mnemonic for 'linked' chord shapes that appear in a cyclic order along the fretboard ...EDCAGEDCAGEDCAG... over and over again. They can be used with different root notes after transposing the pattern. Why? Because things like chords and scales are, in some sense, just made up of relative relationships ...


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