28

No, and for at least three reasons: Assuming "chord" to be a tonal entity, we can explain anything as having alterations, omissions, and extensions. With add11, ♭13, no5, etc., we can make sense of any combination of tones. We can understand harmonies as combinations of chords; such polychords allow any and all possibilities. We have systems of ...


24

The 'add' modifier is used if a note above the 7th is added to a triad, and if the lower tensions are not part of the chord. That's why there's a difference between a C9 and a C(add9) chord. The first has a (flat) 7th, the other one doesn't: C9 = C E G Bb D C(add9) = C E G D Another usage is to add notes that would otherwise replace another note, as is ...


19

As is so often the case in music, a label depends on how something is functioning in context. There are several possibilities for this chord, and they can resolve variously to (at least) chords on B, F, E, or B♭. Prepare for a bit of an onslaught! 1. A French Augmented-Sixth Chord in E Technically speaking, your listing of Root, major third, major second, ...


19

I think the confusion here is that it doesn't matter what order the notes are in. Think of a piano for second...you can pick any D, any F# and any A anywhere on the piano regardless of what order or how much space is in between the notes and you will still have a D major triad. You can also pick 2 or 3 of any notes and you would still have a D triad. Same ...


17

iii is used, I'm not sure where you heard that it wasn't really used much. Sure, you could argue that it's used less than other diatonic chords, (Em in the chart for chords, according to this site), but it's nowhere near the point where people would hear it and go, "Whoa! What's that chord?". In popular music especially, it's often kind of a substitute for ...


17

"If I skip any note, its gonna make it another chord..." No. First: despite the 'pile of 3rds' method of constructing chords in our textbooks, in a 13th chord the 5th may be omitted, the 9th is often omitted and the 11th is ALWAYS omitted. (OK, ALWAYS is just asking for people to come up with exceptions. But it's near enough, and we're talking about the ...


16

Anything over a 7th must contain that 7th, be it major 7th or minor (b) seventh. It's been well established that the 5th (perfect) can be dispensed with, as its sound is contained in the root note. For me, 9ths must have 1,3,7 and 9 - although if there's an instrument playing the root, such as a bass, it can be pared down to 3,7 and 9. Often in jazz, a four ...


14

To answer the question of whether the C chord is "really" V of V, you need to remember one simple fact about music. When you listen to music, you hear it progressing in time. Therefore, analysing any chord in terms of "what comes after it" by looking at the score is just an intellectual exercise, if it has no relationship to what the music actually sounds ...


13

Yep, it is! G♯ is the root, and B, D, and F are the third, fifth, and seventh, respectively. Notice that, since B is in the bass, this is in first inversion, so it's a vii°6/5. As it often the case with the vii°6/5, it resolves to tonic in first inversion so that the diminished fifth B–F can resolve inward, with the B resolving up the tonic's chordal third ...


13

You wouldn't be able to play the D and the F# at the same time because they are on the same string. The only way to play both notes would be to play the D on the 5th fret of the A string, resulting in this chord: This is far more difficult to play and the sound of the chord is arguably very similar.


13

An awful lot of guitar tutors , books and sites seem to feel that every guitar chord must be played in root position. In fairness, it is the most solid sound of a chord, in comparison to the 1st and 2nd (and 3rd) inversions. The open G shape, and open E shape chords automatically give root positions, and A shape and C shape give root if played from 5th ...


13

mode = set of notes + tonic Modes sound different, because each scale degree's distance to the tonic i.e. home note is different. The home note is in a different location relative to the other notes of the scale. The tonic is your zero-point, your viewpoint, where you place your camera: depending on where it is, everything around you is in a relatively ...


12

Don't confuse 'diatonic chords' with 'chords that are used in a song in a particular key'. Once again, I'll pull out one of my favourite quotes (the other one is 'Theory describes, it does not command'): 'Notes outside the scale do not necessarily affect the tonality'. Walter Piston, Harmony. Consider this common progression: C, C7, F, Fm, G/C, G7, C. ...


12

I see at least two reasons: Tonal music is really built on the contrast of consonance and dissonance; the inherent tension and release of that dichotomy is what moves tonal music forward. Your second progression only uses consonant major and minor triads, and so it lacks much tension. But your first progression includes a dissonant seventh chord that brings ...


11

It's V/V. There's a slight modulation from C, and it goes to G, the V of C. Hardly a mod., the piece needs to get back home to C. To get there, it uses the V of G, which is D7 - hence the notes D, F# and C. It's part of the cycle of fourths/fifths - Am>D7>G7>C.


11

C/D is the simplest version. Perhaps D9sus4 if you want D to be the first letter.


11

You could ask the same about the A note. All three are just passing notes, passing from one 'good' note to another 'good' note. I call them stepping stone notes. They come on unstressed parts of the bar. The stressed points usually being beats 1 and 3. Here the A is & of 1, Gb & of 3 and E & of 4, all weak points where almost any note will not ...


11

"Dominant seventh" is a shorthand for what others call a "major-minor seventh," meaning a major triad with a minor seventh on top. If we take all notes of a major scale and create seventh chords on top of them using only the notes of that major scale, only one of these seventh chords will be a major-minor ("dominant") seventh: that built on scale-degree 5 ...


11

It's common to omit some notes when forming a chord (for various reasons; depends on the instrument and the composer). The aforementioned chord is a Fm7 (no5), which means that you play the notes that form the Fm7 chord (F A♭ C E♭), but you omit the 5th (C), thus getting Fm7 (no 5) or the notes F A♭ E♭. One of the most common chord ...


11

Kostka/Payne is one source that explains the iii chord is used relatively infrequently. But they don't simply say it isn't used. You can account for iii's use (or any other diatonic chord) through various harmonic sequences. The "falling thirds" harmonic sequence (a.k.a. Pachelbel's Canon) is one good example of iii in classical music: [I V][vi iii]... ...


11

We can give it the label 'secondary dominant' or 'V of V' and pass on. But that's too simplistic, and reinforces a mind-set of chords being 'allowed'. Playing ANY chord is 'acceptable'. There's no requirement to stick close to the diatonic scale (and except in the most simplistic music of 300 years ago composers never have). A piece in G major will ...


11

The standard tuning of the bass strings are the same as the bottom four of standard guitar tuning - E, A, D, G - but one octave lower. The tones of chords are the same between the instruments except they sound one octave lower on bass. So A2 E3 A3 C#4 on guitar will sound A1 E2 A2 C#3 on bass guitar, and the fretting can be the same. In terms of how to ...


11

You can ask the Greek or look up the theories of Boethius, Glarean, Caspar Printz, Ernst Kurth etc ... The answers will be more traditional than opinion based. But did you look up wikipedia under characteristics / qualities of intervals? I did and couldn’t find much information. The key words are psycological effects of harmonical intervals The idea that ...


11

Stand in your kitchen and look around you. Now stand on your head in your kitchen, so that you are upside down. Do things look the same? (Or if you're not so good at gymnastics, lie on your back and try the same experiment!) The things in the room are all in the same positions relative to each other; nothing has moved. But the world looks very different ...


10

Pretty poor writing! If the dots had stems, it would be more clear, as that top note actually belongs to the bass clef, making it Eb. Even though it could be construed as looking like it's part of the treble clef, which would make it Cb, and utter rubbish! But that's still wrong! C7+9 has an augmented 9th note. That's D#, not Eb, even though it's enharmonic....


10

You write an augmented 6th chord on the flattened supertonic by applying the same Italian/French/German formula to the flattened supertonic as the conventional Italian/French/German Augmented 6ths do to the flattened submediant. For example, in C Minor, the German Augmented 6th on the flattened supertonic is D♭ - F - A♭ - B, while the regular old ...


9

If you write C7b5 a pianist or guitarist will play the right notes. Or Gb(F#)7b5. If you want a functional description, you'll need to show it in context, HAVING a function. There's a couple of tritones in there, either of which could power a resolution in two different directions!


9

Conventionally, the most often skipped notes in any remotely extended chord are the 5th and any degrees above the 7th that aren't included in the chord name. For example, V13 chords in classical music almost never contain the 9th or the 11th. One major exception to these conventions is the 11th chord, where the 11th and the 3rd often are assigned notes a ...


9

As iii is diatonic in a major key I’m sure it’s used all the time. I flipped open a song book and the first song was “she loves you” by the Beatles. Key of G, verse has two B minor chords. “Got to get you into my life” and “I feel fine” by the Beatles also in G have B minor. “I guess that’s why they call it the blues” - Elton John. In C, has E-7.


9

Bassically, the bass guitar wasn't designed or expected to have chords played on it. The notes are low, and even playing a simple triad often doesn't sound good. Muddy describes it well. So, using a guitar and a bass, it's best to stick to one note on the bass, and the chord, or the rest of it, on the guitar. Thus, the bass could play one of the triad notes ...


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