New answers tagged

2

As a first step, there is an error in the arrangement. There should not be a Bb in the chord at m. 15. It should just be a Dm triad, which can be clearly heard in the original piece (link timed to m. 15). The next step is to recognize that the analysis from m. 15 to m. 20 is more simply given in D minor: i.e., the "key of v" Also note that the Db ...


0

If we're in C minor, it's a secondary dominant. V of V. The G being 2nd inversion suggests that it (the G) MIGHT be about to act as a 'cadential 6/4' in G, but it could go other places just as well. I suspect this question is only being asked because of an erroneous idea that a Cm base means all chords should be diatonic to C minor. You can ALWAYS throw ...


1

In the Key of C minor what would a D major chord be? It would be D major It's preceded by C minor and followed by G major G major is the dominant of C minor and D major is the dominant of G major, or the dominant of the dominant which called either a secondary dominant or applied dominant. I don't mean to sarcastic in my answer. I'm just trying to ...


1

I’m curious as to the timing, is it 2 bars of Cm, one each of D and G/D back to Cm? Even if it’s not that exactly, if it goes back to Cm then the D chord is a secondary dominant of the G chord, or a V/V.


0

Short answer: if you're just asking about chords, they're typically thought of as stacked thirds, which means you skip a letter for each note. So a chord starting on B will always contain some note named D and F (or D#, F#, etc.). (Assuming we're talking about standard triads in the European classical tradition here.)


1

Rather than asking "when is a note sharp or flat" the question is more like "how to choose between enharmonic equivalent choises?" For instance we are playing a B, is the third note of the chord a Eb or and D#? If we play Bm is the fifth a Gb or a F#? For that particular choice of enharmonic equivalents the thing to understand is those ...


0

You are dealing with the issue of enharmonic tones in the 12TET tuning system versus the standard naming convention in music. The Major scale in any key will have the following pattern of steps: (W - W - H) - W - (W - W - H) W = whole step, H = half step. There are 8 notes including the octave, 7 intervals. The parenthesis separate Tetrachords. The Maj ...


1

How about the „Bond chord progression“? Is there a music theory explanation behind what gives (recent) James Bond theme songs their tense, dramatic, dark mood? Nobody can forbid us to hear a 5th, and between the major 6th (dorian) a chromatically augmented 5th, if we only listen only to the leading voice. But our „ear“ is trained to hear a VI6 chord when we ...


1

D F A# would make it a minor chord with an augmented fifth. If one wants to make it clear that it's an augmented fifth, make it a 13th chord and employ the B natural (and the E natural) in your melody / solo. Such a minor 13 augmented chord would build up from D F A# C E B or {0, 3, 8, 10, 14, 21}. And here comes the interesting part: depending on the ...


3

Volume and tone (timbre) are more important that the octave. Of course the emphasis on melodic line is what really makes the difference. It's hard to describe in objective terms, but melodic emphasis is what makes the melody stand out. It's a line with unique qualities. It depends on the texture, but in homophonic music the texture is one main melody with ...


2

Indeed typically higher notes come to the first plane easier. Typically during the bass solos the rest of the band goes very quiet... or the bass moves to its higher registers. If you don't have access to dynamics, you can use other means: articulation (legato/portato/staccato), timing, and also arrangement. Organ and harpsichord music might be a great ...


1

The question starts with Dm Dm7+ F and for the other question it's apparently supposed to be going into F major. So, that's F: vi vi7+ I The alternative is Dm Bb9 F or F: vi IV9 I I think there are three strikes against the augmented minor chord idea: augmented minor D F A# is enharmonically D F Bb and while the augmented triad is relatively rare in tonal ...


1

I appreciate the answers and comments given, so far, and have learned from them. Thank you. According to my summary understanding, it seems that one argument says that “augmented minor” is not valid because that’s not how chords like this have ever been described in musical theory before, and in fact augmented chords are not built by raising the 5th, but ...


0

CAGED is the basic open chords. All the stuff I've seen for that is chords in root position. With CAGED chords you might get some explanation that not muting or skipping bass strings on some chords will in effect create and inversion, for example open C major normally doesn't play the open low E string, but if you did, it would create a first inversion C ...


5

In general, people perceive higher sounds more prominently than lower ones, all things being equal. However in practice our perception is multi-determined, so in the way it's asked, there's not a concise answer to the question. For example, density of sound (i.e., chords) can produce the effect of loudness, so that chords in which each note is the same ...


0

Since you're in the key of C, the presence of Bb in the chord prevents its ("formal") interpretation as a ii chord -- which is to say, as a chord in the key of C. It would be C9sus4: the dominant chord in F. Alternatively, it could be looked at as a Bb9 chord, also in F. The interpretation would depend on how the chord sounds in context. Either way,...


1

In the second example (-ger ge-recht, vor dir wird) without accounting for the suspension I think it would be... Gm: ...V V4/2 | i6 Dm: IV V4/2 | i6... ...the suspension is in the bass at Dm: i6 I thought the usual way to analyze it is with suspension figures above the Roman numerals... 4-3 Dm: i6 If that were given without a score, I think it might ...


0

A cadence should be some formal ending, a phrase ending, key defining moment in a section, etc. Cadential harmony and deceptive progression are two terms you can use to describe progression using the chords of cadences without the actual endings of proper cadences. The basic definition of a deceptive cadence is flexible. An authentic cadence is V I the ...


6

Generally speaking C-F-G is known as a "sus4" chord. Historically it would be considered dissonant, but in modern music, especially jazz and rock/pop it's a very standard chord that would not bother the typical listener. In fact, it often has a very pleasing effect. Playing F and G together, out of context, would most likely be perceived as ...


0

Actually, in your excerpt I see no real cadence. A cadence is a musical full-stop. A specific way in which phrases end. Typically it would be 8 bars, but you will find phrases in 12 and 16 bars as well. A 5-chord going to a 6-chord can happen multiple times in a piece, but it only becomes a cadence when it ends a phrase and there is a moment of rest.


3

An augmented triad, by definition, is two major thirds. It's not that a particular note is changed, thus making the chord "augmented". The fact that the fifth is raised from a major chord is just a convenient way to introduce the chord when teaching. In standard theory, chords are defined as stacks of major and minor thirds; diminished and ...


3

If you simultaneously play the notes D, F and A, it very clearly sounds like a minor chord, D minor. If you play D, F and Bb, it sounds like a major chord, Bb major. Clearly like a sunny day, that's a major chord. If D is the lowest note, it's a first inversion Bb major. Calling it a minor chord would be very misleading. Well ok, how about D, F, A# ... but ...


1

You could certainly parse those notes as B♭maj9/D. It may or may not be useful to do so, in context of what comes before and after. Where does that B♭ note lead to? Does D still feel like the root of the chord? A Dm chord with both 5 and +5 might not make much harmonic sense, but it could make melodic sense. Dm, (your chord), F is lovely if you root ...


1

It's a good idea to try to find a basic triad amongst any group of notes in a chord. Here, the three are B♭, D and F. O.k. F A C could also have been in the frame, but let's continue with not only 1,3,5, but 7 and 9 as well.Basic triad makes B♭ major. Adding the A makes it B♭maj7, and then the C makes it B♭maj9. Putting it all together, it's called B♭maj9/D, ...


1

If you respell the chord in triads with the Bb at the root, you'll see it's a Bbmaj9 as you suspected.


0

It's actually quite possible to interpret the B-B7-G♯m chord progression as remaining in B major and therefore involving no cadences at all, especially if you use the blues-style interpretation that the 7 is just to add flavour and does not change the key, then the G♯m-A♯dim-G♯m-A♯dim chord progression following it tonicizing G sharp minor (with the G ...


1

We are in B-major (5 #), in this section extending to the relative minor key: G#-minor. But A#dim7 is actually the 1st inversion of ("dominant") vii° of G#m, which would be Fx,A#,C# => Fxm° F##m-5 (Fdouble sharp dim5) - notated for easier reading as A#,C#,G ("G" = Fx leading tone of G#m.) For better understanding transpose it semitone ...


2

It seems there are two ways of thinking about this. chords are arbitrary intervals above a root chords are the diatonic intervals above a root It isn't purely one or the other, but I think the primary foundation is diatonic with some chromatic modification. Rather than a diminished triad being arbitrarily a minor third and diminished fifth above a root, it'...


19

It is a different voicing, but since the lowest note i.e. the bass note is different, it's also a different inversion, and it changes the chord's function a little bit. With the lowest E sounding your chord is an A/E, which is slightly different. It's still an A major, but it's a second inversion A major. (First inversion would have C# as the lowest note. ...


8

It is simply a different voicing - but it doesn't really sound very good. The E underneath might just be the 5th of the A chord, but it's just a bit overpowering that loud when it's below the low A. You can usually get away with it ringing in sympathy a bit, if you're not fully damping it, but hitting it loud & proud doesn't really work.


-1

It's great that you are not limiting yourself to "being diatonic". But you are selling both music theory and scales short here. Yes, scales are part of music theory, but they are not the only part. There's chromatic alteration, too --- of notes in a tune, of notes in a chord (major in stead of minor, or vice versa, and witness how many different ...


0

I'll try a different answer, but I don't want to change my first one to something completely different, because people already voted for it. There's nothing wrong with thinking about scales. For a musician, scales are one of the most important tools. In the previous question you mention, you seemed to see the harmonic minor scale as some sort of a modal ...


1

The tritone A♯ and E resolves nicely to B and D♯. Other notes in the chords are less important. That tritone is found in F♯7 (the standard dominant of B major). It's also found in A♯m7♭5 and in A♯dim7. (Also in C7, if we want to play with ♭5 substitutions.) So they'll all resolve in a nice functionally harmonic way to B major. There are other ways ...


1

Strictly speaking harmonic function is just a matter of root movements and even more essentially pre-dominant, dominant, and tonic identities. In this regard V I - just two Roman numerals, a progression of roots - is all harmonic function cares about. Melodic matters are irrelevant. It's just a dominant to tonic progression. However, if we are actually ...


0

I don't have much to add to other posts concerning the analysis, however I'd like to point another point. In some cases indeed either diminished and half-diminished chords might provide good harmonization of a melody, however they sound substantially different. If you play one or another randomly, due to mistakes, it might be very confusing for the rest of ...


4

Do m7b5 chords function the same as dim7 chords? If talking about function, it seems better to not use jazz chord symbols and switch to using Roman numeral analysis (RNA.) The two chord types are half-diminished seventh and diminished seventh. The diminished seventh chord is easier to describe first. Usually it is rooted on the leading tone or a secondary ...


1

vii7b5 = (me),se,te,re => V7 without root tone VIIdim7 = (me),se,te,re,fa => Vb9 me or mi in brackets as it can be considered as dropped root tone of the dom7 respectively dom7b9. Critical point to decide which chord will better fit is the melody: if it contains the b9 (in F#,A#,C#,E,G) this would be G - then the A#dim7 sounds better, if there is a G# ...


0

While m7♭5 chords and dim7 chords are fairly interchangeable as dominant-function chords (don't interchange them if the melody note is the 7th), the dim7 chord is a much better pivot chord between keys than the m7♭5 chord, as any given dim7 chord is an enharmonic re-spelling of 3 other dim7 chords, while a m7♭5 chord cannot be enharmonically re-spelled into ...


0

Yes, they are the same. The octave doesn't matter. A C is a C in any octave, an E is an E in any octave. The only differences are in timbre, taste, darkness, openness. The function is the same.


1

Taking Bm7-5 vs Bdim7 as examples. If you want to see the chords as working in the same roles as simpler more common chords in the key of A minor: Bm7-5 (alias B half-diminished alias Dm6/B) works roughly as a substitute for Dm, so it works as Am's subdominant. Bm7-5 contains all the notes of a Dm. Bdim7 (alias B fully diminished) works roughly as a ...


1

The basic triad (which is what usually gives the main "color" to the chord) is the same, and being a diminshed fifth it creates a lots of tension towards the next one - usually a half tone above, and usually the tonic. They are similar and often interchangeable. While they are not diatonic on both major and minor mode, they can "exist" in ...


1

In this case it's a "safe" substitution, because the pitches are within the key (G# minor) and have contextually appropriate functions within the key. A#m7b5 and A#dim7 differ only in the presence of G# or G, respectively, both of which are present in G# minor. (Technically G is Fx, but the distinction isn't important in this context.) The voice-...


-2

Do m7ba and Do dim7 are exactly the same chord: Do m7b5 = Do dim7 Do (root) Mib (minor third) Solb (flat fifth) Sib (seventh) La# m7b5 = La# dim7 La# (root) Do (minor third) Mi (flat fifth) (perfect fifth would be Mi#) Sol# (seventh) (mjor seventh would be Sol##) Anyway, it sounds weird to call A# dim7 and Gm#, are you sure it wouldn't be Abm and ...


0

The Andalusian Cadence doesn't seem to be used in itself to generate closure. Mostly, it acts like a non-chromatic lament bass. There's a stepwise walk down from a possible tonic to its putative dominant. It's less likely seen as a walk from a subdominant to the tonic; I think mostly because the tonic to dominant with an underlying stepwise bass is common in ...


2

Harmonic function is specified without regard to the specific arrangements of notes within a chord or their positions relative to the previous/next chord. All of the following are considered as I chords moving to V chords in the key of C. X: 1 T: I → V progressions M: none K: C L: 1/1 [CEG] [GBd] | [ceg] [GBd] | [CGe] [G,B,D | [Gce] [Gdb] | [E,cg'] [DBg'] || ...


2

I have learnt first the modes (in secondary school) and the 3 minor scales, before knowing anything about functions. I think this is a good plan. You can harmonize without problems different songs based on the different scales. So where is the problem? Another question arises: how far the harmonic minor scale is diatonic. But I think questions like these ...


2

Let 'theory' grow from playing a wide range of music. So your first job is to become fluent with notation. Play music. Play gigs (if only! :=() Play scales to develop fluency on your instrument. That's all. Not everyone's a composer. That's OK. And improvisation is a very over-rated pastime. Don't look for a Theory Of Everything.


4

I want a theoretical framework to know WHY or HOW these chords "work" This question is often asked, and the answers vary. They might be something like, "because they have 2 notes in common" or "it borrows from such and such key or scale" or "it creates dissonance or consonance" or "it is expected/unexpected" ...


3

First, let's have a look at what kind of knowledge make up music theory: Science - basic results that relate to music that can be measured or observed in physics, maths or psychology. Terminology and notation - ways of naming and notating things. Stylistic norms and preferences - observations about patterns in music that have been observed over the ages in ...


6

Only after we understand theory fully are we able to toss it aside in favor of a more fluid, holistic, flexible approach. The problem is that the primary way of achieving that later stage is by studying and learning theory, which means diving into all the rules and minutia. When experienced musicians encourage you to focus less on scales or theory, they may ...


Top 50 recent answers are included