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3

It starts off a 'cycle of 5ths' sequence leading to the tonic with half the chords being ♭5 substitutions. Without substitutions the roots would be B, E, A, D, G, C, F. A very common harmonic cliche, with or without the substitutions.


6

I see and jazz musicians use the #IVm7b5 (Bm7b5) mostly in one of two ways: It can be a non-diatonic substitution/reharmonizaion for the diatonic IVmaj7 (Bbmaj7) chord or iim9 (Gm9) chord. It has 3 notes in common with each of these two chords, D F and A giving it a somewhat subdominant quality despite the tritone it contains. For example, the last 8 bars ...


1

I see the Bm7-5 chord as a variation of Dm or Dm6. If you want Roman numerals, it would be something like vi6/IV#. Try playing this expanded three-step sequence in place of the Bm7-5: Dm - Dm/C - Dm/B. But the song skips straight into Dm/B which is really the same thing as Bm7-5. And then it goes to Bbm. Sometimes that chord is used towards the end of a ...


2

The vii row of your chart will be o (diminished) | m7b5 (half-diminished) | m7b5b9 | m11b5b9 | m11b5b9b13 The remaining chords are correct. Substitutions depend on context, but as a general statement, yes, you can add or remove chord extensions/alterations as you see fit. Notice also that extended chords "contain" other chords. ...


5

I would argue that it's the beginning of a larger pattern of chromatically descending seventh chords. Notice that this Bø7 moves to a B♭m7, and this B♭m7 then moves through m7 chords built on A, A♭, and finally G, this last chord being the ii7 of the tonic F. We call this—when a chord shape is moved up or down in tonal space—planing. And although the planing ...


-4

Personally, I like to call the CEG triad a Cmajor, and the GCE a Gsus4#5. If you are playing in the G key I would use the second notation, though if you're playing C key I look it as a different voicing of Cmaj.


3

Any time you play the pitches D, F#, and A (and only those pitches), it is a D major chord no matter where each pitch is located. Changing the order of the pitches is the process of inversion. When D is the lowest pitch, we call it root position. When F# is the lowest pitch, it's first inversion. When A is the lowest pitch, it's called second inversion. ...


3

They are called chord voicings. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voicing_(music) (If the bass note changes i.e. instead of D as the lowest note you'd have F# as the lowest in a D major chord, then it would also be called an inversion. Inversions can be voiced in many different ways too, but if the lowest note is the same then it's basically the same inversion.)


1

Let me first confirm your question. You want to think of a chord or chords in more than one key at a time. Or, in other words, you want to keep track of what one progression would be from the perspective of other keys. To clarify, you want to use the exact same chords from one key in another key. This is a good skill to have and aspects of this come up ...


1

I'm not certain I understand what you're actually struggling with, but here goes. You know 'the CAGED system' and use it to play chord shapes, arpeggios and pent. scales, but only in key C. For me, the CAGE(D) system works for chord shapes only. I must have learned everything else in other ways. Its use in chord shapes is that there are 5 basic shapes on ...


1

It's just a game of maths as far as I'm concerned. For example, take the C major triad - C E G - and think about all the possible places where you can play those notes. Looking at C. E string - 8th/20th fret A string - 3/15 D string - 10/22 G string - 5/17 B string - 1/13 You can figure out E and G yourself... An inversion is just playing the same chord from ...


0

They're all basically 'open' chords. As such, they contain, essentially, open strings which are part of the chord. The voicings are, or can be, quite different. As John points out E A and D all have 1,5,1 as their lower notes. That's unless you decide to play them in 2nd inversion - quite permissable, but rarely featured in guitar sites - in which case, A ...


0

You can characterize them however you like, there are plenty of comparisons and differences you can find among them. For example, from the 5 CAGED shapes, you an say the first 4 notes of the E A and D shapes all contain Root, 5th, octave and M3rd up an octave from bottom to top, assuming you are not playing the low 5th below the root on the A and D chords. ...


2

The other answers are excellent, and as they say there are multiple ways of naming chords. Assuming the notes are all in the same octave in the order B,C F, this is probably (as Tim suggests) best considered the third inversion of Cmaj7, with 4th substituted for the 3rd and the G omitted. You might write that Cmaj7sus4/B. When might you use this very strange ...


0

The diatonic triads of the harmonic minor scale are: Im, IIdim, IIIaug, IVm, V, VI, ♯VIIdim That means the diatonic triads of A harmonic minor are: A minor B diminished C augmented D minor E major F major G♯ diminished The diatonic seventh chords of the harmonic minor scale are: Im(maj7), IIm7(b5), IIImaj7(#5), IVm, V7, VImaj7, ♯VIIdim7 That means the ...


10

From what I've read on the history of western harmony (there's a good Cambridge Press book about the subject), these were viewed as temporary key changes. These modulations were driven by chromatic voice leading. Lester's book, "Compositional Theory in the Eighteenth Century" had some examples of such progressions being termed (very short) key ...


6

I think they'd have a pretty good idea of the leading-note function of that F♯, and would therefore not have voiced the progression the way you did! Remember, NOTES have tendencies. Not chords. Musicians knew 5 wanted to fall to 1, 4 to 3 etc. long before anyone felt it necessary to codify combinations of such active notes as named chords. And remember, '...


6

Secondary dominants were common in Baroque music, since early days. There was also a different notion of leading tone: they could lead towards a tone by the common leading tone (raising the pitch) or by the supertonic (lowering the pitch). Check out partimento materials and regole to gain insight of this thinking and how harmony/counterpoint were taught ...


0

A diminished triad consists of two minor thirds. The scale degrees would be 1 b3 b5. A triad with a diminished triad and a diminished fifth would contain the notes A, Cb and Eb. It will actually sound like B D# A which is a B7 chord without the fifth. The diminished triad is the seventh diatonic triad in the major scale. For instance, the viidim in the G ...


2

He then recommends that the song be played with the shapes of Em, C, and G on with the capo on the second fret but that they can alternatively be played without the capo as F#m, A, and D. If the needed reservoir of chords is Em, C and G you can play the song without the capo using the mentioned chords above - provided the reader knows which chords are ...


4

Seems like someone had mixed up the order, that's all. Em up 2 frets is F♯m. That's fine. But the other two got mixed. C goes to D , and G goes to A. Simple!!


1

Am I really just going to make it harder for myself for attempting to study theory without a piano or will I be doing just fine except I'm gonna have to put more efforts in everything I will be doing? Music theory is about the relationship between the notes, not how they're laid out. For instance, a Major Third, Minor Third, Perfect Fourth, etc. are all ...


2

I V covers 5 of 7 tones in major keys: ^1 ^3 ^5 ^7 ^2. To get the missing ^4 ^6 use either IV or ii. To play that in basic minor key harmony just make the subdominant minor or the supertonic diminished as iv or iio respectively. But, harmony in minor is a bit more complicated that than, because ^6 ^7 can be in either "lowered" or "raised" ...


1

In basic music theory, there is something called "chord leading" that discusses which chords naturally lead to other chords in a progression and sound generally acceptable. Using chord leading, we can create chord progressions that include chords based on each scale degree in major, minor, and pentatonic scales and have them sound musical. Knowing ...


1

Theory studies (even advanced harmony, post tonal music and counterpoint) are topics apart from instruments or instrumental proficiency. You may not play any instrument at all, and still excels in music theory. But you'll need to take this serious as you'd take an instrument. Of course keyboards will help visualizing harmony and sets, but it's not mandatory ...


3

There is nothing theory-related that you cannot learn on the bass. Also the bass is really far away from being a monophonic instrument! However, like you have noticed already, piano makes visualizing things easier SOME TIMES (I find it MUCH easier to visualize diminished chords on a guitar instrument than on the piano for example, either on bass or guitar; I ...


1

There's a lot more to music theory than chords, which can (and are) played on bass. And extended chords, available easily on piano, won't be part of your curriculum for quite a while yet. And by that time, you'll be sufficiently knowledgable to find those extra notes, even if in arpeggio style, which won't hurt. The bigger problem of bass versus piano is ...


19

You've expressed an accurate sense of why there is a theory advantage with the piano, but since you also very clearly are drawn to the bass, a couple of comments: Particularly if you play jazz or popular music, you will by necessity learn a huge amount about chords and scales and how they relate, because this is the essence of bass's harmonic role in a band....


5

The falling fifths that Albrecht is good. Another possibility is one of the many "rule of the octave" suggestions. These are exercises with the bass ascending then descending an octave, both major and minor settings. The recommend chords are good for short scale segments with a given bass. https://wayback.archive-it.org/org-1018/20170928202539/http:...


4

In modal terminology you could call it the locrian chord as it contains the characteristic tones of the locrian mode: flat 2 and a tritone. Lydian also prominently features a tritone with the root, but lacks the equally prominent flat 2 of locrian. Similarly, phrygian shares the prominent flat 2, but has both a perfect 4 and 5. Trying to squeeze these notes ...


3

Try the chordprogression of falling fifths and raising fourths along the circle of fifths like starting at C: F#-B-E-A-D-G-C and continue the flat direction F-Bb-Eb-Ab-Db-Gb => F# the same with V7 chords the same with ii-V and ii7-V7 like e.g. f#7-B7-e7-A7-d7-G7 exchange the minor and major chords: b7-E7-a7-D7 ... play chromatic downward V7 chords (each ...


2

If you mean playing the scale from tonic up to octave tonic, the best fit chords will be those which contain the actual note you're on at that moment. So an obvious start point will be the tonic chord, either major or minor. If we're considering simple triads, then on the second note, there will be three choices, minimum.. Let's take the scale of C major. ...


9

Chord-naming generally serves two purposes: To indicate the pitches to play, and To indicate the function of those pitches. Allowing in this case that the goal is to get the chord-player to play B-C-F specifically, and in that voicing, then the most likely chord name would be something like Bdim[sus(b2)] or maybe B[sus(b2)][#4], which would sound the same ...


4

The basic triad generally contains a root, a third and a fifth. Hence your C major chord - C E G, C- root, E -M3, G - P5. Minor chords simply change the M3 to a m3. Sus chords usually replace the 3 with a P4. Assuming the B in your chord is root, the 3 is missing, and not relaced by a diatonic 2, but a m2, and the P5 has become D5. No 'ordinary' chord ! And, ...


4

Chords are named after the intervals they contain. A sus2 chord has a major second and a perfect fifth. If you start with a B chord (B, D#, F#) and replace the third with a second, you end up with B, C#, F#, a Bsus2 chord. Your chord, B,C,F with a B root, has a minor second and a diminished fifth so it's not a sus2 chord. In fact it has no name, but that ...


0

I'm wondering if there is a theory behind it. Most tonal harmony theories deal with this kind of progression or transformation. Is there a genre where this is used more often? This is way common. Any style with non-obvious harmony (with this I mean not only 3 or 4-chord music) will feature some changes like that. Probably, in your example, we're in F major (...


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