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As you say your pretty new to music theory ... you shouldn’t start analyzing chords like these crazy chords don’t choose a notation with errors don’t try to transfer or adapt the RN. to a harmony that isn’t written in this music language and doesn’t fit in this system. the simple analysis is: A/f#m, A/G ... etc. we can be pleased understanding ...


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The chord, from your description, highlights G and D in the bass, and has A, C♯, and E in the upper structure. I have not listened to the song, but from these notes, to me there are at least two distinct possibilities. Your polychord analysis was my first instinct, seeing the upper structure and the lower component. A/G5 would be equivalent to the tertian ...


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Here are a few general tips: Expand the bassline (e.g., descending whole steps, moving around the circle of fourths, etc.), then harmonize the added bass notes with chords that fit the melody. For example, in m. 1 of Möge, the bass moves from an F to a C. So let's add stepwise chordal movement: F-Eb-Db-C. Now we have to find chords that work with the melody....


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/ Fmaj7 E♭o Gm7 C7♭9 / Dm7 G9 Am7 D9 / B♭ - F - / G Gm7 C7 C+ / Fmaj7 E♭o Gm7 C7♭9 / Dm7 G9 Am7 D9 / B♭ -C7 - / Fsus4 - F A7 / Dm - A7 - / Dm - B♭6 - / Fmaj7 - G9 - / Gm7 Gm7♭5 C7 C+ / The rest is up to you! Ideas behind it are melody notes that are included in the chords, with some ii-V-I sequences. Use of ...


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This is a standard chord progression you’ll find in hundreds of pop- and folk songs. (Pachelbel Canon). There is not much to change here. F Dm Bb will remain the same, the chords between could be replaced by A7 but this won’t make it more jazzy. It is the rhythm and the style of singing (groove) that will give another touch to this song. (Swing, or ...


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I just wanted to chime in and say that Databases are designed for items that are subject to change. Chords, Notes, Keys, etc don't change. So last thing you want in any music application is latency. Computers are built on mathematics, and so is Music Theory, so they get along quite well. Midi Messages are byte arrays.. And computers love bytes, they take ...


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It's unclear what you you mean by "these same chords." But I will just work through the two possible meanings to illustrate the Roman numerals. If you mean chords identified by the same roman numerals, which means the same functional chords, then the actual roots change! C: bVII bIII bVI are chord Bb major, Eb major and Abmajor Am: VII III VI are chords G ...


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When you use a chord from a parallel mode (C major, C Dorian, C Phrygian, C Aeolian) just use this table to find its roman numeral. These roman numerals stay the same regardless what mode you're in. If you change the key (from C to A), then you just notate that you've changed the key. But you still use the roman chords below based on what mode you're in. ...


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For those examples - where the chords are diatonic, belonging to one key - you can call them relative major and minor. Usually the usage is one chord referring to the other: "Am is the relative minor of C major" or "C major is the relative major of Am." There is another kind of chord pairing where the roots are a third apart but not in the same key, and ...


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...But if I play a melody without any chords in C major and play a G note, does the note itself also resolve Whatever music set C major as the key by definition is creating tonal identities for the various tones and those tones do have melodic tendencies. But there are some things to unpack about resolution and tendencies. Consider both perfect and half ...


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Think of playing a broken chord stacatto style. Though the notes don't play at the same time, the brain remembers the notes it hears and builds the intervals. The same happens with a melody; the brain remembers the notes and expects certain notes; when a different note is heard, it creates tension. Interesting discussion, by the way. It's giving me some ...


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Yes, melodies relate to the tonic just as chords do. And the bass line of a piece IS a melody of a kind, when it reaches the dominant it has a tension towards the tonic. (That tension may be immediately gratified, delayed or even frustrated of course. But it exists!) Melodies generally (but not invariably) end on the tonic. The previous note will very ...


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Whilst G chord is the dominant of key C, it won't always resolve to C. That's where the tension/release can come in. We almost expect a G harmony to resolve to C, so when it doesn't - there's tension! Tension/release can happen with certain notes in a series, so don't think it always needs chords or harmony, but since music is rarely just a single melody ...


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When the label sus4 comes up things get tricky, because that label is from jazz/rock/pop which so often doesn't actually use the chord as a real suspension. This is a traditional suspension... ...the first bar is a G7 and the second bar is plain C major, but notice the F - the seventh of G7 - is suspended (held over from G7) in the first beat of the C ...


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everyone. I am from the country where Sakamoto was born. I suppose that Gm9->Dm9 should be interpreted as IIm->VIm in F Major, not in C Maj! Besides, Gm9->Bm7->E7 should be as IIm(in F Maj)->IIm(in A Minor)->V7(in A Minor) Hope this helps.


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sus4 works on every major and minor chord as you can see e.g. in Bachs little prelude BWV 924 It is also used in the final chord on the tonic Isus4->323 (instead of the plagal cadence IV-I, if you remind this kind of "amen" as the final clause of "let it be" (famiredo ... of course we have here more than just the sus4 ... ...


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If the key is still in F, Eb will be called bVII 7th. This is because Eb is the b7 from the key of F. Btw this is a basic chord progression following harmonic minor/aeolian. Here Fm / C7 means F harmonic minor but Eb7 means it changed to F aeolian.


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Indeed, C7 is the V chord for Fm. And E♭7 is the V chord for A♭. In the same piece, which hasn't modulated or changed key, V can't be both. If the piece has modulated or changed key, then it could be construed that A♭ is the new I, which then makes E♭7 V (V7 exactly). In key F minor, Fm is known as 'i', but A♭ will be III, and E&...


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