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Are the iv and V chords used in the minor scale just like the major scale?

While theory supports that the iv and V work the same way for a minor Key, always let what I call "ear and flow" be your guide. Theory must always be subordinate to practice. In other ...
David B Johnson's user avatar
0 votes

What do the chord symbols on each bar mean?

What do chord symbols have to do with melody? Chord Symbols and Melody share a Common Cause I see chord symbols on each bar, and I assume they represent the notes in the bar [...] If [chord symbols] ...
user45266's user avatar
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1 vote

Resolving chordal 7ths (Maj7, min7, V7, etc.) (melodic vs harmonic tendency)

I cannot find any resources that explain WHY chordal 7ths, when dealing with chord progressions & voice-leading, often resolve downwards. ... Is there a more generally agreed upon reason for this ...
phoog's user avatar
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-1 votes

What do the chord symbols on each bar mean?

No. Staff notation (or possibly tab notation) represent the notes in the bar - pitch and rhythm. The chord symbol represents the underlying harmony. The chord shapes that could be strummed along ...
Laurence's user avatar
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3 votes

What do the chord symbols on each bar mean?

Chord symbols of the sort we all assume you're asking about first appeared in sheet music published for amateur use in the home, before the invention of audio recording technology. The purpose was to ...
phoog's user avatar
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1 vote

What do the chord symbols on each bar mean?

False premise! The chord symbols shown for a particular bar do not, and do not have to, represent the notes found in said bar. The chord symbol tells which chord can be played during that bar. Safe to ...
Tim's user avatar
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5 votes

What do the chord symbols on each bar mean?

Do you mean a lead sheet? No... the chord symbols are not "vague representation of the notes in the bar". The chords are the harmony that belongs with the tune and it's the composer who gets ...
Divizna's user avatar
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-3 votes

Why don't guitar chords and staff notations match each other?

Contrary to what was said above, "root position" of that chord means all the notes are a third apart and the root of the chord is the lowest note. I realize guitar players sometimes have ...
Bill Milagro's user avatar
0 votes

Why don't guitar chords and staff notations match each other?

A complete G7 chord in staff notation would contain an arbitrarily-selected "G" note, an arbitrary (possibly empty) subset of the "G" notes that appear in higher octaves, an ...
supercat's user avatar
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7 votes

Why don't guitar chords and staff notations match each other?

Very simple answer is - they don't have to. Root position tells one fact only - the lowest note - of any chord in root position, is the root. That's how inversions work as well, 1st inversion has ^3 ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 190k
19 votes

Why don't guitar chords and staff notations match each other?

Good question! They do! The situation you're running into is that your chord diagram doesn't match the G7 you've provided on your music staff. On the staff you provided, the notes are all separated by ...
MLunzy's user avatar
  • 221
0 votes

Why don't guitar chords and staff notations match each other?

The arrangement of strings on the guitar means that certain voicings are difficult to achieve whereas others are easier. This also leads to the fact that several voicings, or as we call them, chord ...
No'am Newman's user avatar
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15 votes

Why don't guitar chords and staff notations match each other?

“Root position” means that the lowest pitch is the root of the chord, but it says nothing about the other notes. The staff-notation chord is shown in “close position” – the most compact arrangement of ...
Aaron's user avatar
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1 vote

In harmonic syntax (“root progressions”), does only the root matter, or the entire chord?

One way to look at things is to consider that there are two "basic" progressions happening at the same time. One is the actual bass line (shown in figured bass notation.) The other is the ...
ttw's user avatar
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7 votes
Accepted

How to Identify & Complete Sequences

Sequence A sequence is a musical pattern that is repeated in transposed form. Melodic vs. Harmonic (a.k.a. Tonal vs. Real) In a melodic sequence, the literal pattern is repeated. In a harmonic ...
Aaron's user avatar
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1 vote

What chord do we get by raising the fifth of a minor triad?

Raising the fifth of a major triad gives an augmented triad. For example, you can get from C (C-E-G) to C+ (C-E-G♯) by raising the fifth. Correct. ...C-E♭-G♯, which is enharmonic to C-E♭-A♭ Not ...
El Ectric's user avatar
  • 375
1 vote

How do you recognize open-position chords by ear?

First of all, and unfortunately, you may find yourself largely on your own to solve this problem. Assuming that this is offered as a part of a university music program, these courses are often taught ...
nuggethead's user avatar
  • 4,649
3 votes

How do you recognize open-position chords by ear?

A triad, major or minor, should not come across as dissonant, in open or closed position. Both will contain the same three note, name-wise. It's just that in closed position, those three notes are as ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 190k
7 votes

How do you recognize open-position chords by ear?

Based on my personal experience: learn to play by ear, and then the identification question becomes "what would I have to play to reproduce the sound I'm hearing." Is it a minor or major ...
piiperi Reinstate Monica's user avatar
2 votes

How would you notate the chord G# F B E as a substitute for a G7 chord leading to C?

This is a common voicing in bossa nova. You can see that in different ways depending on the context. For instance in Insensatez: Am7 (5x555x) E7b9/G# (4x345x) Gm6 (3x233x) D/F#. (2x023x) etc....
moonwave99's user avatar
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4 votes

How would you notate the chord G# F B E as a substitute for a G7 chord leading to C?

(I chose to answer despite your already having accepted an answer because I felt I had some information to offer that is relevant to your question) A specific chord voicing cannot always be accurately ...
John Belzaguy's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

How would you notate the chord G# F B E as a substitute for a G7 chord leading to C?

It's E7b9. Probably the most known substitute of a dominant chord is a tritone substitution, where e.g. Db7 (Db F Ab Cb), which shares the third (Cb = B enharmonically), and the seventh (F) of the ...
user1079505's user avatar
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0 votes

Why write notes with same letter name an octave apart but in different positions

I've seen a few composers write in this manner - first chord C in root position (CEG) followed by A in first inversion - (CAE) with the C in the bass written an octave apart from the C of the previous ...
phoog's user avatar
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-1 votes

Why write notes with same letter name an octave apart but in different positions

When playing a chord, the note at the top tends to me more prominent. So in a triad in C, C-E-G, the G is more readily heard than the C or E. If the chord is inverted, then C becomes the top note, ...
Simon B's user avatar
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0 votes

Why write notes with same letter name an octave apart but in different positions

I'm guessing - just that, the question means why use different inversions of a particular (here C) chord in their playing/works. With C at the bottom, it's a root position, and sounds very solid and ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 190k
1 vote

Why write notes with same letter name an octave apart but in different positions

Octaves are equivalent harmonically but not equal. The octave above a given note has twice the frequency; when sounded together, there's not much difference in tone. However if sounded with a ...
ttw's user avatar
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0 votes

When do you include the bass note of a chord if the bass is the b9?

I'm pretty sure the actual chord isn't Dm7b9. The way I see it: there are two kinds of slash chords: Chord inversions: here the actual (full) chord is written before the slash, and an alternative ...
herman's user avatar
  • 203
4 votes

When do you include the bass note of a chord if the bass is the b9?

Context is all. But I’d hazard a pretty confident guess that the E♭ isn’t part of the upper structure but purely the bass note. ( Maybe the tonic or dominant? Is there a string of chords all over an ...
Laurence's user avatar
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