New answers tagged

0

Check out VOICINGS for JAZZ KEYBOARD by FRANK MANTOOTH published by Hal Leonard. Pretty sure a downloadable pdf is available. This has lots of really good explanations, worked examples to play through, plus written and played exercises. It promotes chords voicings that sound fantastic (based on patterns of descending fourths rather than rising thirds that ...


4

First you should be aware that there is a glaring error in this transcription. Either there is a beat missing in bar 10 or bar 10 should be a 3/4 bar because beat 4 of bar 10 and every other bar after that is actually a downbeat. It is apparent by the phrasing of the melody. Play the midi file with the play button and you will see that every 4th beat ...


2

Generally speaking yes, and in particular if this were in the bass then you would have to have quite strong arguments to not resolve it downwards. But in a middle voice, the leading-tone qualities always stand out much less strikingly, so that's usually where the rules are bent in order to smoothen voice leading elsewhere. Presumably, the start of the next ...


0

There could be all sorts of chord substitutions, extensions, etc that create deviations from the norm. But western music is really pretty simple. The most common movements within a key are I-->IV and back, and I-->V and back, also in there is IV-->V and back. If you play an instrument I'd recommend playing these simple cadences over and over and ...


1

LISTEN to the song. Over and over. Maybe slowed down, and in short sections. (There's a little program called Transcribe! that has all the tools you'll need in one convenient package, I highly recommend it.) Work out the bass note. Work out the other notes in the chord. Tip - it can be easier to tell what notes AREN'T there! Narrow your options. A ...


4

Having spent many happy years playing along to the radio and t.v., just doing that is my first recommendation! Once the key of a song has been established, life isn't that difficult. Initially, listen to where a song feels at rest, at home, could end there. That chord at that point is usually the root/key chord. Nine times out of ten, it'll be major. I don't ...


2

This is true, but think of it less as a rule and more of a byproduct of following other rules. Specifically, following these two concepts will result in what you describe: The bass moves up by step because, typically speaking, the deceptive resolution is understood as a V moving to its related vi (or VI). There are other deceptive/evaded/attenuated ...


0

Depending on what kind of music you like and whether you are working up an arrangement of a particular song, or attempting to duplicate an already released song, or even attending a jam session and wishing to participate, there are a few different methods to decide which chords to play. Figuring chords for a Jazz piece can get pretty advanced and it usually ...


1

Without knowing whether having problems means it’s very difficult for you or you can’t do it at all I would suggest focusing on the bass and the melody. Try to figure out the bass line or root movement of the bass and the melody of a song first. Work no more than 4 or 8 bars at a time. The combination of these two things will give you some insight into what ...


0

The answer to this textbook exercise is most likely V65/VI ; and a I/III formula for an applied chord is very rare. Thanks to all !


2

Strictly speaking there is one and only one G7 chord and it is (G, B, D, F). You need to understand a few things about harmony and voicing to fully appreciate the variety displayed in some texts. First, you are free to double up notes. So, on a guitar a common "voicing" is (G, D, F, B, D, G) and yet another is (G, B, D, G, B, F). We can, and ...


0

That's no D9. The notes which make up D9 are D, F♯, A, C and E. With only D A and E, at best it could be called Dsus2. It won't even be D add9, as there would need to be F♯. D sus9 is a faint possibility, with the E so high in the mix. To be a 9th chord needs the 7th (of some sort) to also be present. It's not. And without a third, and more description, it ...


6

With any chord, its root is important - if ony to give it a name! The third is important to define its majorness or minorness. The seventh part can use different notes, but with 'G7', that's defined as m7, making it a dominant chord. The 5th belongs in there, but as the least defining part, can be and sometimes will be omitted. It doesn't bring much to the ...


1

The notes you list wouldn't be WRONG to play over a D9 harmony. But they are insufficient, in themselves, to establish D9. This happens all the time in music. A chord symbol can't tell the whole story.


4

Based on a follow-up comment to the original question, the intended answer is almost certainly V65/VI. The textbook asked to identify the applied chord, and at this point, the only applied chords will be a V(7)/x or viio(7)/x. Later in your studies you may encounter IV/x, or even what we call extended tonicizations, which I discuss here. As such, this A7 ...


2

The G7 chord has four notes: G B D and F. In root position it has G at the bottom. In first inversion it has the B at the bottom, in second inversion the D, and in third inversion the F. Those books shouldn't say B F G is G7, but in certain contexts a musician will leave a note out if it sounds better. The 'fifth' (which is what the D is, being a perfect 5th ...


2

The G7chord always has G as the lowest bass note. Above G the other three notes can appear in any order BDF , DBF , or FBD. If this is in the key of C , then never double the leading note ( which is B ). Also never double the 7th ( which is F ). Often the 5th ( D) is excluded from the G7 chord to avoid parallel fifths in the voice-leading.So using 4 notes in ...


2

It's not needed. III7 is sufficient. Normally, applied chords are V/ or vii0/ or maybe IV/ or a pair like ii-V/. The point is that one is locally adding a V chord to tonicize another chord. Common (in a major) is V7/V7 (D7 in C). In minor, V7/V does occur but more common is V7/III (Bb7 in C major). Unless acting as a temporary dominant (or maybe subdominant)...


2

In key F♯m III is A major. III7 (A C♯ E G ) will generally lead to VI. So it would be called (in key F♯m) III7. There's no need to call it V7 anything else, so it'll be III7.


4

Minor/major is used referring to intervals, scales and chords. Intervals can be big (major) or small (minor) in regards of their nr. of semitones. The chord quality or chord type of major/minor is characterized by the gender. German theorists use the term Tongeschlecht = tone gender: major/minor = dur/moll = male/female (-> dur = hard, moll = soft!) Edit: ...


16

The term you are looking for is "Quality": The quality of a chord (triad) refers to whether it is major, minor, diminished, augmented, etc. I believe it can also be extended to 7th chords. In your specific example "GAB" is neither major nor minor. It might be considered a major-add-9 chord since there is a major third G-B and often the fifth is omitted in a ...


1

Is it just chance or does the sus 4 usually happen on a dominant chord? It is not chance. The suspended fourth has its origin in the dominant chord, before chords were even thought of as such. Indeed, it has its origins in the 7-6 suspension that was common in the early 1400s before polyphonic compositions commonly had bass parts. John Dunstaple (or ...


2

Every major scale have a relative minor starting on the 6th degree, vii. In the major key the triads that occur on each scale tone are as follows. I, Major, (1, 3, 5) ii, minor, (2, 4, 6) iii, minor, (3, 5, 7) IV, Major, (4, 6, 8) V, Major, (5, 7, 2) vii, minor, (6, 8, 3) vii, diminished, (7, 2, 4) Where (1, 3, 5) for example refers to the notes ...


2

You'll notice that ties are drawn much more closely to the note heads. There is no tie in the red circle, but there is in the blue one. For multiple notes to be tied, for each note tied a separate curve is drawn.


0

The formulas for all chords reference the major scale. The numbers are called degrees. {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8} = {Do, Re, Mi, Fa, Sol, La Ti, Do} When building the X major chord you take notes 1, 3, and 5 from the X major scale. In another answer it was stated that if you took the notes form the minor scale you'd get C, Eb, G. While this is correct it ...


-1

Basically there are two types of diminished chords, namely, full diminished and half diminished chords. A full diminished chord is also called a diminished seventh(dim7) chord. A half diminished chord is called a minor seventh flat five(min7b5) chord. A diminished triad has three equally separated notes of a diatonic scale, the first, flatted third and ...


0

There isn't always a completely logical reason why things are named as they are. A diminished triad has minor 3rd and diminished 5th A diminished 7th chord has minor 3rd, diminished 5th and diminished 7th. I suggest you accept this and move on! A diminished 3rd is theoretically possible. (So is an augmented 7th.) But they sound so like a major 2nd (...


1

If we define the triads of all degrees of any scale (minor or major) we have major thirds and minor thirds with perfect fifths: the terms major / minor refer to the lower third. Only the seventh degree ti-re-fa (= B,D,F) in a major scale and the second degree of a minor scale se-ti-fa (= G#,B,D) has a diminished fifth - that's why this chords are named "...


7

In a diminished triad the diminished refers to the fifth of the chord and the third in understood to be a minor third. In a diminished seventh chord the diminished refers to the seventh of the chord and the third is understood to be a minor third and the fifth is understood to be diminished. The names are not a complete list of the intervals of the chords. ...


2

A minor third is unambiguous, and generally accepted to be consonant ("pleasant sounding"). By using a diminished third, we are dangerously closing in to a non-third-based chord, which are generally regarded as too dissonant for basic harmony (i.e. a different area or level of expertise). A diminished third is more similar to a "second" interval.


4

Let's say the root is F#, for example. The diminished chord would be F# A C. (If it were a diminished 7th chord, it would be F# A C Eb.) The diminished third would be Ab. That would make the chord F# Ab C (plus Eb if you add the diminished seventh). That chord exists: it's the German sixth chord.


5

A diminished chord has a diminished fifth, not diminished third https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diminished_triad Diminished third is two semitones https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diminished_third "root + 3rd diminished + 5th diminished" ... if you play that rooted on the first scale degree, it gives a Lydian'ish sound, because it's enharmonic to something like ...


Top 50 recent answers are included