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3

Although you already accepted an answer I have thoughts on this. I listened to the original recording. The E7/B chords are not that but actually Bm chords thus this is a progression and not all A. It is a partially diatonic walk up and back down from A to Dm6. In answer to your numbered questions: iv (or IVm6) is a common non-diatonic chord used in major ...


2

The observation that the entire passage is, in effect, a prolonged A chord, is accurate, and that would be the broad "classical" interpretation. The E chords and D (or B) are functioning as prolongational chords rather serving dominant or pre-dominant functions, respectively. At that level, one could substitute any chord that can serve a "...


2

IMO the first problem is thinking the tritone substitution is something exclusive to jazz, and it's just the domain of jazz to say what it is or is not. Only the name "tritone substitution" is particular to jazz. But the harmonic movement is actually very old and for centuries was called an augmented sixth chord resolution. Technically there is ...


1

Tritone substitution for dominant seventh chords is typically explained by the substitution sharing the third and the seventh with the original chord. But one can look at it in a wider context: An altered dominant chord is built on altered scale, e.g.: G Ab A# B C# Eb F. A substitute built on lydian b7 scale a tritone away, Db Eb F G Ab Bb Cb, which (...


5

The book is taking a liberal view of tritone substitutions. Any chord substitution in which the root is a tritone away from the original is being called a tritone sub. This is not wrong, but it leaves a lot of questions unanswered. The basic tritone substitution is for V7 chords. Substituting bII7 for V7 preserves the the third and seventh of the chords (by ...


0

Here is the reality: there are no incorrect chord changes. There are only varying degrees of stylistically unconventional chord changes. Most likely you are taking common practice harmony conventions, which is what most harmony theory texts teach, which in a nutshell is the harmony style of composers like Haydn from the eighteenth century, and applying that ...


4

I know it's been a long time since someone posted this but I came across it by accident while doing some work online and it caught my attention. The answer lies in the Bb7 which wants to go to Eb, you then raise the chord to a C major. This would be Bb major/ C minor/ D minor(D diminished)/ Eb major: In the key of Eb. Instead, you have substituted from the ...


6

Any mode or scale can be built on any tonic. So, yes, you can have D mixolydian... or D flat mixolydian, C mixolydian, etc. etc. If you have analyzed the song to have a D tonic and is mixolydian in mode, then you can say it's in D mixolydian. It's good that you analyzed for what is the tonic, then the mode. That's analyzing tonality. Simply seeing all the ...


-1

The song is not in mixolydian; it's D major. The song makes use of "modal mixture", borrowing chords from D minor, which is how the C natural comes into play. A song truly intended to be mixolydian would put much more emphasis on the sound qualities of that mode.


2

D Mixolydian is a mode of the parent key G major - both contain exactly the same 7 notes. The main difference, as you say, is that a piece in key G is recognised as that, due to the home note/chord being perceived as G. This has a home of D, thus will be in D Mixolydian - or the Mixolydian mode of G. It ought to have the key signature of one sharp (F♯).


1

In the OP's question and other comments three chords came up I11, ii9, and V9, each with either a major seventh or minor ninth. It seems to me you need to put them in their diatonic context... In I11 it isn't so much that the eleventh is dissonant but that it's non-tertian. Even if you don't play the third - so there is no actual minor ninth - the F sounds ...


1

TL;DR The passage from measure 8–15 is a highly altered / disguised / chromatic version of the following progression in B major (with copious modal mixture):. m8 m9 m10 m11 m12 m13 m14 m15 V → I bVI → V/bVI % V → bii i → V bIII → vi II → V I Seeming modulations to A# and G-: These are actually F#7 and B7. Inexplicable Bb and Eb: These are chromatic ...


0

The convention is an aesthetic one, but there is an important technical difference between the two chords in question. In a Maj11 chord, the 3 and 11 are are a minor ninth apart. For example, in a root position CMaj11 chord, C E G B D F, the E and F are a minor ninth apart. In a Min9 chord, the 3 and 9 are a major seventh apart. For example, in a root ...


0

They're not a semitone away, they're an octave and a bit !! True, the note name sounds like it's close, but in reality, that's why it's called an 11th, or a 9th - it's just that the 11th or the 9th is over an octave from its named neighbour. So, because there's no semitone or tone distancing the notes, there's no clash of pitches! Sharpening or flattening ...


1

Bars 9-10 are fairly clearly in G major (the rough LH chord progression of Bars 9-10 is I6-V7-I6-V7 in G major). Note the many naturals there. Bar 8 prepares Bar 9 pretty badly, though. It starts off with a "changing notes" figure in the right hand that obfuscates the left hand's vii°6/4-V7 of V (note that the right hand clashing harmonically with ...


-2

I think you're just conflating all 'non major' chords as 'minor'. The purity of a major triad with the more astringent nature of, well, anything else! The 'Mars' chord certainly isn't a nice clean major triad. You lack vocabulary to describe a D♭5/C5 chord (no, criticism, so do I!) so you lump it as a 'minor' flavour.


0

Stacking all the thirds to the 13th gives you all the notes of the major scale, since all those modes you mention are derived from C Ionian, then it stands to reason that you will have that relationship.


0

Another contributing factor may be that the chord sequence Db-Ab-G is a typical Neapolitan Sixth-Augmented-Sixth-Dominant pattern which is rather common in both C major and C minor though it's (supposedly) "closer" to being diatonic in C minor (fewer accidentals.) The posted score from Old Brixtoniann shows the entire passage is wedged between two ...


1

It's important to understand that subdominant doesn't mean "just below the tonic," but rather "equally far away from the tonic just in the opposite direction. Key of C F G A B C D E F G IV. -------- I. -------- V Notice above that (if C is the tonic) G is the dominant five steps above and F is the subdominant five steps below. The ...


3

Descriptions like this can become a bit subjective and vague, but we can still try to explain what is felt. I would suggest there are two things going on: In common practice, "classical" harmony the standard functional progression is subdominant IV to dominant V to tonic I. But in that paradigm we can also say the tonic/dominant pair is basic ...


0

The word "dominant" is part of the "tonal system" of thinking about the functions of chords within a key. It doesn't necessarily imply anything about dynamics or volume (though you might be able to draw some generalizations about it). Its "dominant" role in a key has more to do with what its job is and how well it can do it. The ...


1

Since the rest of the song is in D major, then for the F#M chord, I would use the fifth mode of the B harmonic minor scale: F# G A# B C# D E F#. This scale incorporates all of the notes in the chord while staying as close as possible to the key of D major — differing by only one note: the A#.


0

As Andy Bonner wrote, there are many ways to interpret this progression. |: G F#m G F#m G F# :| A possibility is to treat F# as a secondary dominant in Bm resolving deceptively to G, which for that short moment is VI in Bm. Then you can choose from a variety of dominant scales to play over F# depending on the flavor you like. What supports this ...


1

I see elements of two different questions. One is "what should I play during the F# major chord," and the other is "How do I analyze this looping progression?" The second question can affect the first. The simplest answer is "Well, if the chord is F#, then play in F#." As you noted, this "sounds" most easily satisfying....


6

First arrow indicates a repeated B, second arrow indicates an interesting (and quite 'outside') interval of a diminished FIFTH (not fourth) between F♯ and C♮. I can't see what else the book might have been referring to. Is there any possibility of a misprint or error in translation? A diminished 5th is common. A diminished 4th is rarely encountered ...


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