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1

Am7 - D7sus4 D7 - Gmaj7 - E7sus4 E7 x 2 Diatonic to a key signature of one sharp, G is a reasonable tonic. The E7 is a secondary dominant to the Am7, assuming x 2 means the progression repeats. Root progression by fifths. Am7 Bm7 - Cmaj7 D7(9) - Gmaj7 Also a tonic of G. Note the root progression by steps, not fifths, I think that may be relevant to the &...


-2

Assuming all the chord progressions you provided are correct, and without listening to the piece... The chord progression Am7 - D7sus4 D7 - Gmaj7 - E7sus4 E7 x 2 Am7 Bm7 - Cmaj7 D7(9) - Gmaj7 - Fmaj9 is actually in A minor, not G major. The E -> Am general chord progression at the E7 x 2 Am7 section and the fact that the chord progression starts with Am7 ...


0

So this is somewhat the harmonic structure of the piece: [INTRO] Gmaj7(7) Cmaj7(3) Gmaj7(7)/7 Cmaj7(3) Bm7(3) em7(7) Bm7(5-3) GP C/Em [VERSE I] Am7 D[4-3](9-8) Gmaj7(7) E7[4-3]/7 Am7(7) D[5-8][4-3](5) Gmaj7 E7[9-10] Am7 D7 Gmaj7 E7[4-3][5-7] Am7 Bm7 Cmaj7 D7 Gmaj7 → Fmaj7,9→Fo Cm7,9 F7(6) Bfm7,9 Ef7(6) Am7,9 D7 [VERSE II] Am7 D[4-3][9-8] Gmaj7(7) E7[4-3]/...


-7

Stacking fifths up from F you get FCGDAEB. These are notes in Cmajor. Write down each note's position. 4-1-5-2-6-3-7. Note that the first three are 4-1-5 ... why?... because they are the most consonant from F. And as you move up fifths you the notes/chords relative to C become more dissonant. The next three up are 2-1-5... and that's why it's so common in ...


0

To answer the question, it is important to go back to some basic ideas. The invention of Jazz. Basicly, it's an improvisational platform. The 2-5-1 progression incorporates the strongest cadence i.e. the 5-1 and allows for relatively easy modulation and returns between keys. It serves as a means of letting several musicians employing a variety of melodic, ...


0

My take is that the intro clearly is in Db major with the melody notes (other than the passing D and E chromatic) all in the Db major scale. I agree the key change occurs in bar seven when the Em leads to the dominant A7 setting us firmly into the D-major key, clearly the home key of the song. This is definitely one of the most innovative tunes and harmonic &...


7

The primary job of a jazz pianist is not to write chord symbols for groups of notes. The primary job of a jazz pianist is to look at already written chord symbols (or even better, know the changes without staring at a music sheet) and make an artistic contribution by coming up with notes. So if the book is about jazz piano, written for aspiring ...


2

In addition to other good points made: For me, in the context of jazz standards like "What's New?", with the piano left hand in that range, that tritone F B is the dominant feature, with whatever-it-is in the right hand being "just harmonics". Even without seeing the C-chord next (yes, as other have said, a C6/9...), I would wager that ...


3

Probably because it came from a jazz resource where authors notoriously combine chord names or Roman numeral analysis with enharmonic misspellings. Second you may not know about rootless chord voicings in jazz. Typically, rootless chord voicings involve the chord root played by some bass instrument, like the piano left hand or an upright bass player, and ...


14

With a Tritone for the left hand and a major triad for the right… an experienced jazz pianist would immediately recognize this as a rootless upper structure voicing. So without any context, the options are either Db7#9 or G13b9. The next chord (a rootless fourth voicing) helps to narrow it down to G13b9.


9

But by looking at the chord in isolation (without the context of the following C major chord), can we tell that this is a G7b9? We can't. Without context I could call it E7b9 (although 9 in bass is rather unusual). So is it then not G7b9? This seems to be a demonstration (or transcription, it's from Levine's book, isn't it?) of how an instrument (piano in ...


0

Chords can 'go together well' in many ways. Here are some of them. If they are all constructed from notes of the same scale. (Beginners sometimes think this is the only one. But there's LOTS more possibilities!) If both chords have one or more notes in common. If a tension in the first chord is resolved, the surrounding notes can be pretty well up for ...


0

This relationship of chords in minor third distance was already used in Renaissance music: it is called in German QUERSTAND and in English FALSE RELATION https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False_relation like Aaron mentions the music theory and harmonic analysis for the common practice period doesn't fit to explain all Pop music and neither the early music of ...


4

"Music Theory" — or more specifically, "Common Practice" or "Tonal" Theory — isn't designed with popular music in mind, and popular music frequently isn't constructed with music theory in mind. View #1: Voice leading In the case of this particular chord progression, I find it productive to consider it in terms of voice leading. ...


1

Chromatic Mediant! Take any two major triads with roots a major or minor third apart. They will always share one note between them. They have a very distinct, fresh, fantastical sound. The last four chords are all chromatic mediants. C# to A#. Common tone is E# A# to G. Common tone is D (spelled C double sharp in the A# chord) G to B. Common tone is B. ...


2

Tim's answer above reinforces the fallacy that every chord must fit the scale of the key, so if it doesn't the music must have modulated to another key. Not so. There is a thing called Chromatic Notes/Chords. This allows a progression like C - C♯dim7 - Dm7 - G7 - C to exist completely within the key of C major. It is not useful to consider the Dm as a '...


1

This is kind of an abstract meta-answer... feel free to downvote. Musical notation is a form of written language about musical ideas from people to people. Who is your target audience? How do they interpret what you're saying with the notation? I understand your question so that you're having problems even yourself - none of the chords symbols you could ...


5

Consider that a lot of pieces modulate between parallel keys. So being in D minor at one point becomes being in D major at another. Your G♭m (probably better called F♯m) is from key D major, rather than D minor. So it's not surprising that it sort of fits in your song. It's a useful bit of theory to keep handy - because as well as the usual 3 majors and 3 ...


2

E, Bm7, E, Bm7, C#, A#, G, B E Bm7 that's a root progression by fifth, ordinary, just as you said. Eventually the B chord returns to E, and the melody dwells on E. We could say it's nominally in E, but with all the chromaticism, it isn't strictly E major. The progression repeats so write that out for clarity... E Bm7 E Bm7 C# A# G B | E... The progression ...


4

G7sus/D is probably the most useful description. Why are you using chord symbols? As an attempt at harmonic analysis, or as an aid to sight-reading? When naming a chord results in something as complicated as Dm7(add4)(no5), isn't it simpler to just read the notes? (And anyway, as far as harmonic analysis goes, there IS a 5th, prominently repeated in the ...


2

Functional analysis and voicing rules (G resolves to A) are time bound and not universal. So you are free to name the chord as you like. All we can say is that G is surely not A♭♭! Most logically seems to me to call it a secondary dominant of G e.g. like Dm is ii-V or D is V/G). (Even I know we are in D-Dorian! Thats the way I listen to it in d-Dorian as ...


3

I head the D-bass and the remaining notes as distinct here. So I'd describe it as stacking an Fsus2 chord on top of D in the first bar. That also takes care for the fact that the G resolves upwards, although when it does resolve the chord is not F anymore but rather F♯o.


6

I would probably go with the original purpose of chord symbols, which is not theoretical analysis but rather to tell the guitarist and bassist what to play, call it G7sus4/D, and not worry about it any more than that. Harmonic analysis is a subjective topic about which reasonable people can reasonably disagree, and if your main purpose is to prepare ...


6

Naming chords isn’t always an exact science, especially when they are not just a series of stacked thirds. Also, keys and modes are somewhat irrelevant to chord symbols with the exception of correct enharmonic spelling within a key (ex. F#m7 in the key of E instead of Gbm7) As for your choice #1, I understand what you mean that it sounds like a suspension of ...


2

It is indeed the NNS - Nashville Number System. Each chord in a key is given a number, corresponding to the note number in that key. Here, in D♭ - D♭ =1, E♭ = 2, F = 3, G♭ = 4, A♭ = 5, and B♭ = 6. That may seem to be extra stuff for little purpose - just write the perishing chords, please! But, the idea is far reaching. In the recording studio, for example, ...


6

This is Nashville chord notation system https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nashville_Number_System The numbers refer to the scale steps on which the chords are built. The song is in the key of Db major. 1 means chord built on the first step, Db major. 1/3 means Db chord with 3rd scale degree in bass, F. 3m is a minor chord built on the 3rd scale degree, F minor. ...


4

As you say, C, E, and G make a C major chord. But those notes can be played in any order, and they can appear multiple times, and still be considered a C major chord. E G C is a C major chord; C C G E E G is a C major chord; .... As long as there aren't any notes other than C, E, and G, it's C major. This is true on all instruments, not just guitar. And it's ...


4

The C chord comprises C E and G . That's all. So any strings that make any of those notes will be up for grabs. As you rightly say, some strings need fretting to make those notes, BUT others are already producing those notes while they're open. So why wouldn't they be left open to play as we strum that C chord? OP mentions only 5 strings! A lot of guitar ...


0

¨The Maj7 is the leading tone in a chromatic minor scale -> the major 7th: The natural 7th in Aeolion is a minor 7th and requires a sharp to become a leading tone. e.g. G# ( leadtone) in chromatic A-minor is notated as Am♯7 In Cm the major 7th is B and the chord Cm with an notated as Cm♮7. The natural ♮ is needed because the Cm scale and the ...


-1

Seventh chords have four notes, each note having one in between, which means a span of seven notes. The span between the triad notes can only be WW (augmented triad - "+"), WH (major triad - "M"), HW (minor triad - "m"), or HH (diminished triad - "°") because of the half-step/whole-step pattern. So what are the ...


1

When we speak of music theory, we tend to mean "common practice era" theory — the theory of Mozart, Beethoven, and their peers up until the twentieth century. However, jazz and popular music, while they do often adhere to the same theoretical ideas, they also tend to depart from it, and this would seem one of those times. Jazz and popular styles ...


0

I view this as a modification of the progression from "Puff the Magic Dragon." The progression from that song, I–iii–IV–I, would be A–C♯m–D–A in the key of A. The only difference between this progression and your progression is that you replace the opening A chord (I) with F♯m (vi). And this is a very common substitution: theorists since at least ...


0

The problem stems (IMO) from the non-existence of a symbol for a major chord. If it existed, we would be accustomed to noticing its absence in sus chords, and thus we'd be accustomed to understanding the resolution of the sus from the key, rather than the sus chord's assumed major-ness.


2

Yes, of course you can put any notes you like in a chord, so the question is more about naming convention. Typically words augumented and diminished are used for triads only (at least in jazz/pop nomenclature). An exception is a fully diminished chord or diminished seventh chord 1 b3 b5 bb7, e.g. Eo7 (E G Bb Db). Extended chords still can have diminished/...


2

The note augmented or diminished in these chords is ^5. So C7+ will be spelt C E G♯ B♭. Cm7♭5 will be C E♭ G♭ B♭ - often referred to as C half-diminished. The same works for 9ths, but it's confusing as the 9th part itself can be seen as diminished - as C7 with D♭ added, or augmented - as C7 with D♯ added (as in the 'Hendrix' chord). Written names will help - ...


0

A ♭6 chord isn't a thing. No-one's fingers fall automatically into a ♭6 shape when they see that symbol. A maj7 chord is. Call it Emaj7/G♯. A quick read of the symbol won't result in anything WRONG. As always, if you want a specific voicing write notation.


2

Option 1 My preference is G♯m♭6. Slimming things down to basic triads, we have A G#m F#m, a perfectly reasonable sequence of descending triads. By naming the chord this way, it best reflects the descending bass line as well as the fact that B and E are present in each chord. Option 2 The chord is EM7/G#, making the overall progression A(add2) EM7/G# F#m7/11....


0

Generally, spread out the notes in 3rds if you can for naming: E, G#, B, D# That's an inverted major 7th. (i.e. a major 7th but the lowest note isn't the root of the chord)


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