New answers tagged

1

1-3-5-♯9 Is this an add♯9 chord? Yes. Adding the sharp doesn't change the way add chords work. The sharp means you're adding an augmented ninth rather than a major ninth. Over a root of C it would be a D♯. Over a root of B it would be Cx a double sharp. The only things I can think would be a problem are: Lots of people will misspell it. With a root of C it ...


0

I agree that these are modal 'color' chords over a pedal point. The V chord is not functioning as a dominant at all; rather, it brings out the Lydian nature of the IV chord. The Lydian mode gives that faraway, otherworldly sound, and is especially exploited in cinematic music. You might have better luck with pop/jazz music notation, even though you lose the ...


2

It's triads over a pedal. F, G/F, F. If tempted to call the second chord G7/F, take the idea a little further... Wouldn't it be ridiculous to call that new chord A♭6/F? No, these are plain triads over a pedal and deserve to be named as such. But I don't think Roman numbers deal with this very well. It likes everything to be functional. (This, of ...


2

In your last question, you engaged with the common-tone diminished seventh chord (CT°7). But diminished sevenths aren't the only possible common-tone chords; another common possibility is the common-tone dominant seventh (CTV7), which I would argue is what we have here. This is especially common with IV moving to V above a scale-degree 4 pedal, as it does ...


1

The tonal center of a piece cannot be independent of its melody, and rhythm alone cannot determine a tonal center. Drum cadences are made purely of rhythmic unpitched drum parts, and they are, predictably, atonal. However, a monophonic, single track of a capella raw vocals with no accompaniment can - and often will - still have a tonal center. Take the first ...


2

I see two ways to analyze this. First, it's just a IV-V7-IV with a subdominant pedal. Another possibility is a IV-V42-IV progression. Both give the same note. I think the first describes the music a bit better. It might be worth looking at some of Handel's stuff as he liked the third inversion seventh enough that it's been commented on in the music history ...


0

Normally the melody do-ti-la above IV (the subdominant) will be considered (the middle not e) as passing tone. Now together with parallels of 3rd and 6th we get a resoti (V) chord. I think it is most useful to consider this passage as a slash chord and it will help you to transpose it easily in other keys. I think the idea of passing tones or suspensions 6-...


2

Not fully understanding the dots - it's key C,from the key sig., and the chords go from F to G7 back to F. That G7 is in 3rd inversion, because the F is in the bass.If it was going to be called V/IV, in key C, that would make it C7, which it obviously isn't, and anyway C7 would be designated I7. RN isn't particularly helpful in cases such as this. It could ...


4

Even if we are given a chord progression that is followed through the entirety of the song, that information is not sufficient to predict the scale right? Actually, that is the typical way to know the tonal center, the tonic. You basically look for cadences or harmony that gives a sensible dominant thereby implying a tonic. The use of cadences is pretty ...


1

Your question is really unclear, but I'll take a stab at it. The chords Dm, Gm, A7, F, E7 aren't in the key of Fm, but they could be in the key of Dm (Dm = i, Gm = iv, A7 = V7, F = II, E7 = V/V). And the key of Dm is relative to the key of F major. That means it has pretty much the same notes, but it doesn't have to have exactly the same notes - F major ...


1

Take any Baby song, children song, folksong, Spiritual and you will recognize that the song is ending on the root tone and root chord, the tonic. Ex.: doremifa sososo_ sofamire dododo_ do mi so - so fa mi re do latidore mimimi- rerere- mimimi- latidore mimimi- miredoti la—- Mozart’s first composition ended all: lasofa mi re do. other clauses in common ...


3

Your understanding of the tonic chord seems just fine. Your real question is about locrian mode an whether a diminished chord can be a tonic. I think you should make a distinction between what are musical conventions and some notion of absolute, objective musical qualities. There is a very long traditional and some acoustical support of the sense of ...


1

I don't think there is a big problem with either version. Where is the root of each chord may depend on the voicing used, and you are the best person to answer where you hear the root of each chord. Note also, that chord symbols don't always have to indicate the roots of the chords. They primarily serve as an efficient way to communicate what notes to play. ...


3

Your Tonic chord is simply the core triad, either major or minor that a piece of music is based on. It has nothing to do with "white keys, or black keys" (Sharps or flats). It it the resolution of a perfect 5th in which the third tone of the fifth is the 7th of the base tonic. A simple example: the take a song in the key of C major. That is ...


2

You have described perfectly why the Locrian Mode (as a tonic of an entire piece at least) exists almost exclusively in textbooks and contrived exercises. You understand the feeling of 'home', and recognise that a diminished triad doesn't do it very well! AS to tonic chords: If major and minor are the only choices of mode, they can be defined by a three-...


4

You're correct about the Locrian mode. It's rarely used, because 'home' is supposed to be a diminished harmony. Which in itself is unstable. So it's somewhat of an oxymoron. In Western music, it's well established that simple major or minor harmonies (chords) are way more stable than any other. Could that be why the vast majority of pieces are deemed to be ...


6

What do you mean by the tonic chord feels as 'home'? If it doesn't feel like home, you shouldn't call it a tonic. If it doesn't feel like a center, don't give it the number 1. If you TRIED to make it sound like home, but it did not sound like home, then you FAILED. As simple as that. Maybe you tried to do something that's nearly impossible to begin with, ...


0

When examining chords, all of the notes must be considered, not just one hand. Also, a chord keeps its identity regarding the order in which the notes appear. The chords are: Chord symbol video voicing root position Roman numeral D#m7b5#11 D# A C# F# G# D# F# A C# G# iim7b5#11 G#7#5#9 G# C E F# B G# B# Dx F# Ax V7#5#7 C#m9 C# B D# E G# C# E G# B D# i9 F#...


10

About the "tonic" Not every scale has a tonic chord. Tonic is primarily a concept in major/minor Tonality and does not apply (the same way) in modality or to non major/minor-Tonal music. When other kinds of musical structures are involved (the Locrian mode, for example), one more generally speaks of a pitch center, which is a more general term that ...


3

The Wikipedia user who posted that image has done so based on no references or practical experience, as revealed by reading the chat for that page. The convention is that the harmonic minor scale is assumed, so in the key of C minor, i=Cm, iio=Do (D diminished), III=Eb, iv=Fm, V=G, VI=Ab, viio=Bo (B diminished). There's no need to write III as bIII and no ...


0

There are two systems of naming chords by Roman numerals. You can decide what key you're in and name strictly diatonically. In a major key, the tonic is I. And in a minor key it's still I. In C major, E major triad is III, in C minor E♭ major triad is III. What, you might ask, about chords that include the 6th and 7th degrees of the minor scale? Do ...


2

You are right on the first two points... Roman numeral indicates the scale degree Upper case means major triad, lower case means minor (also include suffix o means diminished triad and + means augmented) But the important thing is the scale in question is given by the key signature. And there is a sort of matching and alteration that can happen with the ...


3

The bIII is your tip-off that this is a "borrowed chord". "When we’re in a major key, we can “borrow” chords such as iio, bIII, iv, bVI and viio7 from the parallel minor key, which means the minor key of the same name. Of these chords, iv is the most common. Borrowed chords in minor keys are less common, but we can sometimes borrow the I and ...


6

I believe it varies between different people's/textbooks' conventions, but as I understand it, the Roman numeral itself indicates the degree of the scale, and the capitalization indicates major or minor. Any preceding accidental changes the root note from that degree of the scale (but the quality still stays the same, so this changes all the notes). This is ...


12

If one is in a major key, then III is a major chord build on scale step 3. An example is in C major, the III is an E major chord, E-G♯-B (in some order.) The symbol ♭III in C major is an E♭ major chord, E♭-G-B♭ (in some order.) If in a minor key, then the III chord is built on a flattened third so in C minor, III is E♭-G-B♭ (in some order). The term ♭III ...


2

This is simply an inversion of a seventh chord. A C# E F can more easily be thought of as F A C# E. It is an augmented major seventh chord and yes it is beautiful! A jazz pianist friend of mine (a far better musician than I) has often told me it is his favourite chord! It doesn’t matter that you have the A in the bass, this doesn’t have to make it some kind ...


2

I would call this an A(b6) adding the parentheses to avoid having it be mistaken for an Ab6, or Ab C Eb F. An “A add b6” is another option. The fact that it is built from the 5th degree of the harmonic (or melodic) minor is incidental as chord symbols are not tied to any particular scale or key,


12

How can I do this the right way The right way is to take context into account, and the note reduction decisions are usually somewhat artistic choices. Your program has to be able to look at the song and understand what the essential point is. What does the picture represent? Context means things like: What key is it in? How does each chord turn the ...


1

I think there are really just two basic voicings of these chords (the open EADGC chords.) Open voiced: E, A, & D chords where the lower tones are root, fifth, octave Close voiced: C & G chords where are no "gaps" G isn't exactly all close, depending on how you play it 320003 or 320033 there is a gap at the top, but by comparison to the ...


0

Yes. However, chord functions in minor generally assume a raised 7th scale degree (i.e., leading tone). So V in minor is presumed to be a major chord, and VII in minor is presume to be a diminished chord. When the chords have a lowered seventh (minor V and major VII), although they are generally considered to have the same dominant function, it is a much ...


2

This site https://bartoszmilewski.com/2020/05/25/guitar-decomposed-3-moving-sideways/ does a great job of exploring the relationships between the CAGED shapes. The author is a noted programmer and mathematician who is applying some of those skills to guitar. In terms of a system to analyse the voicings, if looking from the bass I tend to think about the ...


1

I'm not sure. When in doubt, I always use the b13 especially if a 5th is present. I have a chord I like: an E power chord with a b7 and a b13. I call it E5minor7b13. It's a sweet chord that is dissonant and harmonious at the same time, like rooks flying away into the dusk sky. But, I'm self-taught, and what little theory I know is chord structure. I use the ...


2

Yes. All of your chords are named and spelled correctly.


1

The video is demonstrating the use of a lead sheet, in which only the melody and chord symbols are given. It's up to the pianist to decide how to play the chords. It is a separate arrangement from the one shown in the first image. To my knowledge, a I chord in Cmaj is C-E-G but only C-B-D are used. The I in this case isn't describing an individual chord; ...


0

Okay forget trying to place the chords, and just look at the root movement. This is just playing around the V chord, B. The rest of the chord notes are texturing, not to be thought of as part of the key of E.


1

it's in E minor. Where you sharp the 7 depends where you are in the progression and what melodic figure you're playing at that time. You might raise the 6 too if you're playing a melodic figure where that sounds good So E, F# G A B C(#) D(#) E is a good place to start to pick out some melodies that sound nice, and whether or not those sharps in brackets are ...


0

CM7 disturbs me somehow ... but C7 would fit well as German6 (which is in Jazz equivalent for bVI) chromatically descending to the dominant. The augmented 56th chord derived from c,e,g,a# (1st inversion of a#,c,e,g) - in jazz notated as C,E,G,Bb. Anyway ... in e-minor your progression could be i-V-VI7-iv-V


-2

Easy to fit/solo in E Phrygian, E minor and, forcing a little, in C Major or Lydian (because of f# in B7 chord). But fits well and, specially good (at least to my ears), in C minor.


3

In any chord, certain notes have certain importance. The root is important as it gives the name to the chord. In this case, E7. The third is important as without it, the chord will be neither major nor minor. An important factor in harmony. This one contains G♯, making it a major based chord. Since it's a 7th chord, it needs that 7th part. Here a D note. ...


0

The fifth of a chord isn't very important, because it doesn't do much to define it. You can leave the fifth out whenever you want, with no bad effect.


16

In general, when you only have a limited amount of voices and you need to leave out a note in a chord, the Perfect 5th is the first to go. A Perfect 5th doesn't typically add a lot of color to a chord and thus typically when playing a chord it's viewed as OK to omit without changing the nature of a chord. I will say for this specific chord, there's no reason ...


9

It is common to omit a note from a chord, especially on a guitar, where 3-4 note voicings commonly sound the best, and also it's not always convenient to play all notes. In many cases perfect fifth is a note that doesn't add much to the chord and it can be omitted as in this case. So yes, this is a perfectly valid voicing of E7 chord.


8

It is common to omit the 5th in a seventh chord. In the case of E7, that means leaving out the B. E is the root G♯ is the third B is the fifth D is the seventh Omitting the fifth is also commonly done in minor seventh and major seventh chords.


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