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5

Some of the answers focus on tuning here, but as Michael Curtis points out, that's not an issue on many instruments (and -- as phoog notes in comments -- isn't even an issue for many performers on instruments with more flexible tuning unless they're particularly sensitive to how they tune unusual intervals). Historically, the distinction was partly wrapped ...


2

My lead sheet copy of this song shows D flat major for the 8 bar into, and D major for the rest of the song. In terms of analysis identifying keys for the chords does not necessary fit exactly where the key signatures are given. This is an important part of understanding modulations, notation, and analysis. Musical sections are often no it simply on key. It'...


0

Unusual augmented and diminished intervals are there to create color in the harmonic progressions in pieces where they appear and are applied.. They are normally a mixed structure, so to speak and don't appear in your regular diatonic contexts. Context differences are key here. There are many possible combinations of a respective augmented third; (let's take ...


1

I’m going to disagree with everyone here. As far as I am concerned, the intro (everything before the Em on “just”, at which point we’ve changed to the key of D) is actually in the key of F# (or F# Lydian, depending on whether you interpret the C natural in the melody, on the first syllable of “understand ”, as diatonic or chromatic). When I say “everything”, ...


4

Essentially, "yes." But you really don't want to think of it as "dominant in the scale of the destination chord." Instead think of it as the dominant to the destination tonic. The simple reason being that, using the given example with a secondary dominant of A7, the A7 is dominant in both D major and D minor. Also, in the sense that "...


4

In a secondary dominant such as "V of V", you think about the "of V" being a temporary I. For example if you go to Dm using a secondary II-V of Dm, then you do it as if in the key of Dm, for example Em7 and A7. We say that we're "in" a key. But not "in a scale". "In D minor" means in the key of D minor. Key ...


3

Any chord has specific notes which make up that chord. Any scale has no bearing at all on that fact. So the question itself isn't clear. In whatever key, A7, for example, comprises A C♯ E G. Even in a key with no sharps, but flats instead. So the chord A7 will have those 4 notes even in D♭, with 5 flats. EDIT: actually using your example, we quite often DO ...


4

The whole verse is made up from 2-5-1s, as stated in the clip. So it's not surprising that after Am7♭5 - D7 - it's Gm, of some sort - rather than B♭, of some sort. Were it B♭, the preceding chord would more likely be F(7). The fact that the chord shown is in 3rd inversion is really neither here nor there. The bassist at that point would most likely play a G, ...


9

Yes, it is Gm7 (or Gm9) with missing G. This is called rootless voicing, and it is a common way of playing chords in piano jazz arrangements. It is assumed that the root is played by some other instrument, like bass. It doesn't need to be doubled, and if doubled it may even clash. Please note that the rootless version of the chord still contains the two most ...


4

The video is misleading at this point, because the left hand (or bass part) has been left out. The left hand (or bass) would be playing G, so the total chord would be G-Bb-D-F-A, which, strictly speaking, is a Gm9. The added 9th, the A is a "safe" addition in this situation and adds nice color to the chord. It's not a Bb7, because that chord has Ab ...


5

No, it isn't a dominant chord. More of a subdominant. But there are plagal cadences as well as perfect cadences. If you want to say that the IV (or its variations) in a IV-I cadence has 'dominant function', as in 'a chord that isn't the tonic and leads well to it', fair enough. But that doesn't make it a dominant chord. Not all progressions are ...


2

The half diminished chord on ii, key C, utilises D, F, A♭ and C. The same notes as iv6 - Fm6. F, A♭, C and D (both in root position). So here, a subdominant chord. Which does sound quite dominant, mainly as to get to C major, the C doesn't move, the A♭ moves a semitone to G, and the F moves a semitone to E. The semitone moves from dominant to tonic are the ...


6

This is ultimately the claim made by the concept of negative harmony. (See the negative-harmony tag for some other questions and answers about it.) In short, negative harmony inverts chords around the tonic root/fifth axis. You're in C major, so we can invert chord tones around the C/G axis, which is the same as inverting around the E/E♭ axis. (Yet another ...


6

D,F,Ab,C have 3 tones in common with B,D,F,Ab which is considered as a rootless V7b9 chord. (The tone C would be the suspended 4th of G7 ...) Maybe that's what you perceive when playing Dm7b5 or Fm resolving to C. Indeed Dm7b5 is often used as substitution of Dm7 in a IIm7-V7 and D7-G7 would be secondary dominant of G7. All melody lines leading from C to B ...


2

Roman numerals i VII V VI are for analysis where the octave, direction, and melodic aspects don't make any difference. Pop/jazz symbols D#m C# A# B are basically for lead sheets or extra info above a song melody staff in songbooks are convenience in guitar tab. But a basic expectation is the player will ad lib from those chords. Those two things won't do ...


4

That is the purpose of standard music notation. Chord symbols by themselves are directionless, as well as non-specific about the voicing of the chord (except for the lowest pitch). If you want the chords to be played in a particular way, there are three options. Write it out in standard notation. Make a recording for the performer to learn from. Create your ...


3

Having thought about this for a while (and being unsatisfied with the lack of detail in my assertion that a D sounds more idiomatic than a C♯), I am posting an answer to elaborate. My reasons for calling this chord a (modified) IV6 chord include: I've always heard the F♯ to E interval as an unresolved 7-6 suspension. Typical figures for a bass line ...


2

It's F# minor without the fifth. The E is a pedal tone. One way to establish this, is to play the opening measure without the E. The overall sense of harmony is unaffected, which helps demonstrate that the E is independent of the harmonic progression even though it is often a participant in it. The core harmonic progression is I: First measure V65 (or viio):...


3

I'm writing a chord identifier based on notes and need to know if it is possible or not. I think this is the question really to be answered here... I assume we're speaking about jazz/popular music chord names (as Dekkadeci pointed out, other naming conventions exist). Chord symbols are not really meant to indicate the exact notes to be played by the ...


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