New answers tagged

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First of all it is a Blues tune so "a bluesy approach" should be taken. It is a 12 bar pattern with the significant changes in the expected places. The Real Book changes (which may not be "real", or true) are very rich, lots of cycle extensions and substitutions. That makes the song feel very deep in my opinion, not just another blues ...


2

I think it's important to introduce another interpretation, one that I see has been proposed by piiperi Reinstate Monica and Alexander Woo in the comments: This is not a common-tone diminished seventh, but rather a viio7/V that leads to the dominant that appears in m. 61. True, this dominant is embellished by first a cadential six-four and then two further ...


1

Look at the notes rather than the chord names. And look at the whole line of music. Bass line. A, B♭, B♮ - where COULD it go next but C? (Well, lots of places. But you see that C is a good place to go, maintaining the strong rising line?) F is common to the two chords. G♯, being a sharpened chromatic note, rises nicely to A. (That's why it's written as ...


3

The Bdim7 is better viewed as an Fdim7. In this light, it's a "common-tone" diminished seventh chord. Whereas a "tonicizing" diminished seventh "resolves" to the following chord, a common-tone diminished seventh shares a note in common with the following chord and serves a prolongational function. By placing the Fdim7 in second ...


2

TL;DR Jump to the part about Rameau. We have come to think of chords as being defined as stacks of thirds. However, it's more accurate to say that chords are interpreted as stacks of third, or, better yet, chords are interpreted in terms of stacks of thirds. Before thirds and sixths Before there were "chords", as we understand them, there were &...


1

The first thing in trying to determine the key of piece of tonal music, is to focus on the most important thing of tonal music: the root note of the piece of music. The root note is the note where tension is resolved, the "home" of the musical sequence. Although there are many situations where you can guess it from a written representation of the ...


0

I didn’t know the term borrowed chord before I came on this SE site, but I knew and practiced the minor subdominant from jazz and pop songs and also the major IV in the dorian scale or the major V of harmonic minor tunes. I was also familiar with the mediants that are called here parallel chords. The major II was a variant of the minor ii, the major bVII ...


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I am learning about borrowed chords and all explanations state it's done in conjunction with a parallel key. Why? Because that's what "borrowed chords" are, chords from the parallel key. It's literally just a definitional statement. But why did they do that? I can take a few guesses, but you need to understand the truth is "because they ...


2

It's a little difficult to know what you're asking. The trivial answer is that it's an eight-note scale, E-F-G-Ab-B-C-D-D#; you really can just call any collection of notes you want a scale and try to compose music with it. I could call this "Phrygian flat-four with an optional raised seventh", or plug it into the scale finder and tell you that it'...


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What [scale] could I use? Single scale option All of the answers generally revolve around noticing which notes are in the chords you're playing. @PauloHenrique was most explicit about this. So let's take that solution a step further. Looking at the roots of the chords gives: X:0 T:chord roots K:none L:1/4 E F G _A Similarly, the chord fifth give: X:0 T:...


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I feel your pain, Ab chords can be annoying, lol. The way I see this is E, F and G can all be seen as chords (Em, F, G) or modes derived from the C major scale. This approach will allow you to play the notes of one scale over those 3 chords, E Phrygian, F Lydian and G Mixolydian. The Ab is a special case and can be approached a few different ways depending ...


1

Think of it this way. If you’re writing a vaguely classical thing in C major and to round off a phrase you use the chord sequence C Am D7 G then the f-sharp in the D7 is a chromatic alteration needed to temporarily tonicise or modulate to G major. This is not modal borrowing - the D major chord is not alluding to C Lydian. If you instead decide to end your ...


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"Also if I'd like to transform those powerchords to regular chords, I would go by ear as well, so I'm not really sure if there is a trick to know which powerchords should be major or minor let's say. It depends on scale but if I don't know the scale at first it becomes a bit a trial of error journey for me" There is no rule. You can do anything in ...


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You don't need to get stuck to a single scale. You can use more than one at the same time, change scales or play notes out of the scale on purpose. I see this as a mix of C major and C harmonic minor scale. Because you use G, G# and D# Now, it doesn't fit to any scale that I know, the Ab is really annoying me. For example if I had to play a solo over this, ...


0

Composers already use your first example of "borrowing" plenty of times. They just don't call that borrowing from a parallel key. Chords like F♯-A-C-E in C major are called secondary dominants. Due to using the leading tone of the dominant of the home key, they strongly tend to resolve to the dominant. They can be found in Baroque music, so I ...


3

As has been already said, the notes (E F G A flat) fit into F minor scale. There is another connection, that the first and last of them together form an E maj7 chord. Powerchords have built-in ambiguity, as they are neither major or minor, and also the upper note can be treated as being like a harmonic (it is actually an octave too low, but for some purposes ...


3

In rock and pop the minor scale and the minor pentatonic scale are most commonly associated with power chords. Sometimes the minor harmonic is also used. In your case, I would imagine that any of those chords, if they last long enough (e.g. one or more bars) would go well with the corresponding minor scales. On the other hands, if some of those chords are ...


0

Modulations or the movement from one key to another is common because music makes us move. There is a reason dance and music has a unavoidable connection. If it's when you go to a rock-concert and feel the stack of Marshall's pump air against your chest or whether you are emotional touched by a Chopin's nocturne, all music leads to movement. Modulations is ...


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Bit of a strange question - why do they matter? It's a straightforward move from one parallel key to its partner. Same root, same P4, same P5. It changes the mood without having to move very far for all instruments - if they use the maj/min equivalents. But that's not that often. The listener feels where 'home' is, and that is static. It's only the mode of ...


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...interpreted in terms of harmony I suppose you mean an interpretation according to common practice or functional harmony. But that isn't the only way to analyze harmony. I think it might help to think of what's going on in mostly linear terms. You have one step-wise line ascending to Bm in G A Bm. If you regard some of the chords in the next part as an ...


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There are various ways to hang a label in it. Neapolitan, Phrygian, ♭5 substitution (pity it wasn't a C7...) Maybe the simplest way to legitimize it is this. You know you can always precede a chord with one rooted a 5th lower - remember that 'Cycle of 5ths diagram'? Well, add the 'rule' that a chord rooted a semitone above also works. Add it to your bag ...


4

We call this harmony, a major triad built on the lowered second scale degree, the Neapolitan. In the Classical style, it often functions as a predominant, moving to V and then to i (or I). But in other styles—like your example here—it can also function as a chord that moves directly to tonic. And it actually can be understood as modal interchange, but not ...


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Here's my beginner answer, based on only common sense, not knowledge of Japanese music, except what I could quickly find on English web pages. How to make chords from a scale - by combining notes from the scale. And I'll assume one of the notes is a bass note, so for "chord progression" purposes we'll differentiate between chords containing the ...


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It's not a move to minor, just temporarily borrowing the G-Flat. The whole sequence functions as predominant. In order the chord sequence functionality is: The first chord Fm11 (diatonic minor ii-11) The second chord Abm9 is a borrowed iv-9 from the parallel minor. Move to vi (Cm) is a bit unexpected, but it continues the pattern of jumping up a third in ...


1

The passage quoted is a prolonged predominant. We're in the key of Eb major, of which the I chord immediately precedes the chords in question. ii (Fm), iv7 (Abm7) (borrowed from Eb minor), and vi (Cm) all serve as predominant chords, easily moved between because of their shared tones. From Cm the remaining chords arise from a chromatically descending bass ...


1

My amateur speculation with lots of secondary dominants: Fm Abm7 Cm might be iv-V-i in C minor (Abm7 is similar to G7) I think Bb should be Eb (inversion), I don't hear a D natural in the chord Cm Eb Am7b5 might be ii-V in Bb (Am7b5 is similar to F7, and you can think of the Bb note in the Eb chord as just a passing tone from the C in Cm to the A in F7) So ...


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a very common progression: Yesterday (Beatles) I (ii7b5 V7)/vi The song is in Eb. Do you mean the passage I - ii - iv? Eb Fm Abm (Abm = minor subdominant) I don’t think that there’s really an a minor chord in it. This could be a chromatic passing chord V- bV - IV: (Bb - Bbb - Ab) Now I’ve found may be a quite correct chord sheet where you can see after the ...


1

quick answer using interval names: G+n5d7db. The 6th also includes the G+, so that would be C5+


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When I started to play with open country jam sessions, playing major chord songs, I could hear, in the overall sound major 7th, major six, sus etc chords. It was caused, either by the melody and or by a RIFF played by wn instrument.


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The underlying harmony is A7 (♮13 ♭9), which could also be notated more simply as A13♭9 (the notation A13 implies that the 7th is flatted). In context, the progression is: | GMaj | A13♭9 | Bmin | and the A13♭9 to Bmin creates a false cadence. The chords | GMaj | A13♭9 | want to resolve to DMaj, which would create the highly common IV-V-I progression. But ...


0

Think of it this way: In the key of A, you have C# = Maj 3rd, E = 5th, so you have an A maj triad. The F# is the 6th, and the Bb a flat 9th. It's an odd one. If the dom 7th were there I'd lean towards a 13 (b9). But the A does NOT have to be the tonic. Starting from F# I would tread the Bb as enharmonic with A#. And I'd treat the A as enharmonic with the ...


0

In addition to the other answers, I would suggest that one factor might also be that the first major triad that shows up in the natural overtone series is based (discounting octaves) on the fundamental or first harmonic: 4/5/6. The second major triad we find is based on the third harmonic (again discounting octaves): 12/15/18. That's the equivalent of our ...


1

You can call it 'modal interchange' if you like. But that sort of assumes that a progression SHOULD stick to one mode or scale, or that it's normal for it to do so, which just ain't so! This comes pretty close to being in one scale though, if we lump the Natural and Harmonic variants of the C minor scale together. As @ttw mentions, it implies a strong ...


0

Nowadays, when performing Potk Pie, Beck segues into “Brush With the Blues” from his Who Else album, which is a basic 12 bar, but I agree with Rob H as to the changes from his original version. Also, I’ve heard variations of the solo section, using other than the standard changes, done by others, including Mingus. True, many versions stick to the actual ...


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This chord progression fits comfortably in C minor, sometimes including the ♭VII (B♭), and sometimes the leading tone (B♮). Cmin = C E♭ G G/B = B♮ D G Bb = B♭ D F Fmin/Ab = A♭ C F Ab = A♭ C E♭ Eb/Bb = B♭ E♭ G Bdim = B♮ D F Extracting the unique pitches, we get C D E♭ F G A♭ B♭ B♮ C which is exactly C natural minor, plus ...


3

These chords all belong to melodic c-minor: B♭ is the VII (♭) of Cm melodic downward (identical with natural minor and the aeolian scale). The VII isn’t augmented. C, B♭, A♭, G ... is the upper tetrachord downwards. G/B is the 1st inversion of the dominant chord containing the leading tone B. The Roman numbers are: i - V6 - VII - iv6 - VI - III64 - vii dim ...


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This looks a lot like a descending bass progression. These progressions don't really fit some descriptions as the driving force is the descending bass line which holds things together. Your description has a bass of C-B-B♭-A♭-A♭-E♭-B. It looks similar to the "lament" bass (been around for centuries from pre-tonality to post-rock). An example would ...


1

Part of all musical traditions stems from listening and expectations. However there is a physical basis for the V7 Chord wanting to resolve to the tonic. For convenience think about the dominant 7th going to a tonic in C and think of how each note relates to both the major scale and the C harmonic series. The C chord contains the 3 lowest different notes of ...


2

All supposition - but if one hears a scale which stops on its leading note, it feels unfinished - probably because it is. Stop on any other note, and there's not that same feeling of 'just one more, please'. Added to that is the sub-dominant note, producing a tritone, which we seem to hear as quite unstable. That also needs resolving, and would naturally ...


4

There is no physical explanation that chords or tones (leading tones) want to go somewhere or resolve. It is the composer and the audience - or the music theorists - who want chords to be resolved like a dominant into the tonic. Physically tones and chords are dead! Melodic and harmonic tension exists only in the listeners ear. So it’s us who are ...


2

I'm not sure that this is a physical explanation but the V-I or V7-I or V-i (and variants) all derive from earlier (Medieval? 1300? I don't remember.) phrase-ending patterns that involved a major sixth moving to an octave (in two voices) by a half-step and a whole-step). For example, D-B moving to C-C (octave). There have been lots of (in my opinion ...


1

I learned the classical way of naming chords and also a more modern way which I prefer where everything is literally spelled out in relation to the root note of the keys regardless of whether it’s major or minor. There are no small letters and all relationships are spelled out like the way intervals are named. Examples: Diatonic major chords: I IIm IIIm IV V ...


2

It really depends on the convention one adopts. Some music theory symbols are pretty standard, but one sees variances among textbooks, theorists, and the style they are analyzing. I'd say the most standard pattern in American "classical theory" textbooks of the past 40-50 years is to assume in A minor that VI means F major, VII means G major, and ...


2

I think it's important to remember a vital distinction here: an accidental before the Roman numeral applies to the root of the chord. An accidental after the Roman numeral is figured bass. So in A minor, F major is VI, because F is scale-degree 6 in A minor. Only in A major would we need to clarify this F-major chord as ♭VI (or ♮VI if we want to be really ...


2

Usage varies. But I'd suggest that the only unambiguous method is to name chords, whether as chord symbols or Roman numerals in relation to the major key. Whether the key is C major or C minor, C,E,G is 'C', C, E♭,G is 'Cm'. Similarly, C,E,G is 'I', C, E♭,G is 'i'. B♭, D, F is '♭VII', B♭, D♭, F is '♭vii'. There will be disagreement about this!


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If we need to analyse a work written strictly in Am, I think VI and VII are clear enough. If there is a modulation between Am and A, and we want to keep A as root, I would use ♭VI for F and VI for F#. Same if any modal interchange occurs, e.g.: A F#m F G I vi ♭VI ♭VII Regarding the occurrences of F# and G# as chord roots, it really depends on the ...


1

The basics of modern western music theory probably originated with Pythagoras about 2,500 years ago. By Mozart's time music theory was already very well developed. How do you think he actually wrote down his music? He used the notation of music theory. It would probably be easier (and much quicker) to identify the music theory that Mozart didn't utilize. The ...


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Mozart has been musically educated by his father Leopold and was influenced by Johann Christian Bach and Joseph Haydn. He was trained in studying counterpoint, harmony, chord theory. It is likely that Mozart studied Fux's work first under the influence of his father ... http://www.opus28.co.uk/Fux_Gradus.pdf Fux: Gradus ad Parnassum. Also see: Haydn - Mozart ...


1

Steven Laitz calls this a common-tone diminished seventh chord, which is labeled "c.t.o7 to distinguish it from other uses of diminished chords.1 (See also Wikipedia's Diminshed Seventh chord: other functions.) Its function is to "maintain the root of the harmony they extend".2 Here is a reproduction of Laitz's Example 35.17A, which ...


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