New answers tagged

-1

Typically A minor or C6, but could also be F Major, D⁷, F#dim, B♭M9, B7♭⁹ and many many more. Look for reverse chords online or the App Store.


1

Let's keep it simple: An E dominant 7th (E7) chord is E G# B D. In all cases, a dominant 7 chord consists of 1, Major 3, 5, and minor 7 relative to the root of the chord, regardless of what key the song is in. Dominant also means the 5th note of the scale, and in most western music before jazz came along, that's where that kind of 7th chord was usually ...


5

They both have a lot of overlap, but the biggest difference is in their use. Roman Numeral Analysis as stated is used mainly in analysis while the Nashville number system is more for practical purposes. Some specific areas to note are below: Standardization The Nashville Number System is a little less formal so there are a lot of variants in its use. The ...


2

There are a couple possible issues that lead to confusion when applying the algorithm for constructing chords in key. The first is proper name convention for the notes. In equal tempered tuning (standard fretted guitar, piano, etc) the C# and the Db are enharmonic. They are the exact same frequency and played the same way. For all intents and purposes ...


4

Strictly speaking, in any key, the dominant chord is that based on the V. So, in key Em, the dominant chord will be B. Thus the dominant seventh will be B7. Using the 'stacked thirds', as we do for a lot of chords, that gives us the notes B D♯ F♯ A. All of which are diatonic to the Em key and scale. Some people aren't too happy using 'diatonic'...


6

Chord symbols are used to specify absolute intervals that are not related to any key or scale, and you can calculate the note pitches in semitones, regardless what "key" someone might be thinking about. E7 means: E - G# - B - D. In the key of C minor, E7 is E - G# - B - D, in the key of Bbbb, E7 is E - G# - B - D, in the key of Z semi-middle-sized, E7 is E - ...


8

This is speaking in the key of E minor. Reading this sentence I understand Em is the tonic. In Em the V7 is B7 (b d# f# a). Let’s assume you’re searching the V7 with the root E, which is the dominant7 of a-minor. The term dominant 7 chord is implying that this is the major V7 of the tonic in any scale. In your case (dom.7 =E7) the tonic (I) is A major ...


2

If you’re building a E dominant 7th chord (notated as E7), the notes involved are E-G#-B-D. Notice how are the ‘alphabets’ above are one note apart? That’s because chords are typically built by stacking in 3rds. The 7th of the E7 chord is by adding a 3rd above the 5th of the chord (ie. the B), it won’t be a C# or C anything, since a C is just a 2nd above B. ...


0

If we want to look for larger groupings, it would be well to look at the melody, whose smooth movements make up for the jerky chromaticism of the harmony. In the A section, the melody is diatonic in G natural minor. The Bbm7 might be heard as a neighbor chord to Gm7, since just 2 notes move by half steps and back (D-Db; G-Ab). In the B section, the melody ...


3

Here’s my take on it based on playing chords and scales over it and feeling the tonic. The written key signature (two flats) doesn't reflect the key changes. Gm : i of Gm Bbm7 : i of Bbm (repeat) “Dbm7” : i of C#m, or iv of G#m Fm6 : i of Fm (the “6” is just extra flavor, Cm feels wrong, but Fm6 - C7 - Fm6 is OK) F#m6 : iv of C#m, or i of F#m (repeat) If ...


-4

Because major and minor scales are diatonic and modes are not. Major scale is build from WWhW and minor is from WhWW. Notice the first and last interval are whole intervals. That's what makes these five note patterns "diatonic" and why keys are created from them. Cmajor + WWhW = G, the fifth note of CMajor as well as the next key upward having one sharp (...


13

mode = set of notes + tonic Modes sound different, because each scale degree's distance to the tonic i.e. home note is different. The home note is in a different location relative to the other notes of the scale. The tonic is your zero-point, your viewpoint, where you place your camera: depending on where it is, everything around you is in a relatively ...


10

Stand in your kitchen and look around you. Now stand on your head in your kitchen, so that you are upside down. Do things look the same? (Or if you're not so good at gymnastics, lie on your back and try the same experiment!) The things in the room are all in the same positions relative to each other; nothing has moved. But the world looks very different ...


4

True, the seven modes of one key all contain the same notes as the parent key (Ionian). But it's the key centres that differ. In the Ionian mode (major key)in C, the actual note C is the root, home if you like. When a piece is in that key, the note where everything feels like it's at rest best is that C. All the other notes bear some relationship to that ...


0

The first thing necessary to formulate your thesis is to understand your data and what other approaches have already been implemented. If you are thinking of a dynamic or interactive approach take a look at chords and scales identifier. The reference to "Lotus Music" was useful, but it presents a static interface.


3

Don't try to relate E♭ major to C major in a functional way. Just accept that a sudden shift of tonal centre to just about ANYWHERE is an acceptable and common device in today's music. And don't try to explain the return to C from Eb as a dominant-tonic. It's just a return to where we started. That naturally will be 'satisfing'. There is a world ...


4

Think of the piece as being in C minor for a second, rather than C major. E flat major just fits right in as a diatonic chord, as do A flat major and B flat major. "But wait, it's clearly not in C minor!". Well, in general, once we become accustomed to 'blue' thirds and sevenths, some of the distinction between major and minor tonality arguably falls away. ...


4

In music, we usually reserve the term "dominant" for the chord built on the fifth of the key, but there are a few exceptions to that, tritone substitutions being one of them. However, I've never heard an example where I felt that modally mixed/chromatic mediant chords were functioning as dominants, except for secondary dominants, which obviously doesn't ...


1

Whatever you say is likely correct, but in a documentary Jeff Beck shows a letter he got from Mingus praising and thanking him for his version. I believe the doc is called ‘Still on the Run’.


4

In general, when you have two Roman Numerals on top of each other they are known as secondary chords. They are chords that have function outside of the current key. The most common of these are secondary dominants which V7/V correlates to temporarily tonicizing V via raising the 3rd of ii7. To this specific instance of iii/IV, the author is saying that they ...


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