26

The 'add' modifier is used if a note above the 7th is added to a triad, and if the lower tensions are not part of the chord. That's why there's a difference between a C9 and a C(add9) chord. The first has a (flat) 7th, the other one doesn't: C9 = C E G Bb D C(add9) = C E G D Another usage is to add notes that would otherwise replace another note, as is ...


18

There are acoustical reasons for not wanting close voicing in the lower register; in short, the upper harmonics muddy each other up and fog up the sound. But in my experience, C4 is a really high limit; I can think of tons of scores with thirds below C4. Every musical environment is different, and sometimes you might want that slightly muddy sound. But if ...


16

Anything over a 7th must contain that 7th, be it major 7th or minor (b) seventh. It's been well established that the 5th (perfect) can be dispensed with, as its sound is contained in the root note. For me, 9ths must have 1,3,7 and 9 - although if there's an instrument playing the root, such as a bass, it can be pared down to 3,7 and 9. Often in jazz, a four ...


9

Closed vocings aren't bad, but you need to be aware of the register you are in no matter what you compose. In lower registers, having notes close together isn't always what you want. Specifically intervals that are supposed to have color like 3rds and 6ths both will sound "muddied" to most. Perfect internals typically don't observe this problem. This is also ...


9

Conventionally, the most often skipped notes in any remotely extended chord are the 5th and any degrees above the 7th that aren't included in the chord name. For example, V13 chords in classical music almost never contain the 9th or the 11th. One major exception to these conventions is the 11th chord, where the 11th and the 3rd often are assigned notes a ...


9

Yes, you're right that in many genres of music pianists and guitarists have to spontaneously come up with parts based only on chord symbols (and hopefully also listening to other members of the band). This is called comping. Bass players typically also have to do this too; even if the bassline is written out in that piece that isn't always the case (and if ...


7

Omit the 11th. Next one to go is usually the 5th. Then the 9th. C makes it a C chord. E makes it major. B makes it a maj7. A makes it a 13th. In practice, the 13th may well be the melody note. Perhaps YOU don't have to play it. Likewise the root, if there's a bass player. Note that you MAY omit the 5th and 9th. You almost certainly SHOULD omit the ...


7

Human pitch discrimination is frequency dependent. There is a concept of critical bands. You can read about it in a text on Physics and music by Rigden. I keep promoting that text because I've taught out of it as several universities. There are probably many good texts on the subject. In short, there is a critical minimum frequency difference at which ...


7

Yes, you generally double the 3rd of the chord. It's the chord note that is easier to resolve. Let's take this example in C major, a simple I bii V I: You can see that both the neapolitan chord and V use the note D (flat in the first chord, natural in the second one). This is usually considered a bad harmonic relationship (in two chords played next to each ...


7

Yes, any seventh chord has inversions. No matter what chord quality, the seventh chords are inverted the same (actually, all chord qualities are inverted the same way). It's possible to invert ninth chords (and beyond), you just have to reconsider the method you use to produce inversions. The way most people learn inversions is by taking the bottom note of ...


7

You do it step by step, first inserting "midway" chords somewhere in between, and then if you want, even more intermediate chords between those. Step by step. If you want to go through all of the given original chords and aren't allowed to change them (though why wouldn't you if you're messing with the chords to begin with), there are only two guiding ...


7

I don't know the video, but normally one uses only 1 instance of each letter. Also (with exceptions), the best guess at a chord comes from considering the notes as stacked thirds. This would give A♭-C-E♭-G as the chord. This an A♭ major seventh. (The same as the OP G# major seventh.) (A G♯ major seventh would be G♯-B♯-D♯-F♯♯, not as easy to write though.) ...


6

What are drop voicings? Drop voicings are formed by taking a close voicing and dropping certain notes one octave. A drop-n voicing drops the nth note, counting from the top, one octave. For example, a drop-2 voicing of a CMaj7 chord can be formed by starting with a close voicing C-E-G-B, i.e. a stack of thirds, and dropping the 2nd note from the top one ...


6

Muddiness depends on other considerations as well, such as volume and tuning. Just thirds (i.e., in a harmonic ratio of 6/5 or 5/4) will sound clearer than equal-temperament thirds. Check out some renaissance counterpoint, which generally works very well with trombones playing the lower voices. I'm thinking of Schütz Die mit Tränen säen, SWV 42, and Selig ...


6

As a bass singer in an amateur SATB choir I think this is acceptable. I haven't played the notes, but going from the 4th note on a scale to the 5th (only an octave lower) and back to the 1st note is not uncommon. The key question is probably how well notes fit a given harmony in general and how well they fit the respective chords. Singing Bb C F in your ...


6

There are at least three "textbook" ways to use a 6/4 chord in common practice harmony, apart from the cadential 6/4. Of course outside of common practice harmony, there is no limit to what you can do except your musical imagination. In a passing 6/4 the bass note functions as a passing note between two stable chords. In a pedal 6/4 the bass note remains ...


6

Pianists and guitarists in these styles are expected to be able to play from chord names and bass lines. If you cannot find an Fm6 in a heartbeat then this means more practice. As for the comping style, this varies between players and genres and is up to you. On the guitar it may be just four downstrokes per bar, a funky cross-rhythm in the style of Nile ...


6

The voicing doesn't usually affect what a chord gets named, although there are slash chords which tell what the chord is, and what note is the lowest - its inversion. If he's calling it Cm♭6, then it won't be spelled with a G♯. G♯ is an augmented 5th. The ♭6 of C is A&flat. As soon as I hear stuff like that that's inaccurate, i ...


6

The difference between C9 and C add9 is that the latter chord doesn't contain the 7th.


5

Typically you choose the quartal voicing after you have decided on what mode to improvise with. For example, if the chord is Cm, you are likely to choose the dorian mode. Then you have many choices for quartal voicings that are enharmonic to that mode. The example you've given, F-Bb-Eb, is widely used over Cm because it includes both the 3rd and the 7th, but ...


5

As a trombonist, I've used D3 as the cutoff though I make context dependent exceptions. When you say: or to put the 1st trombone up into the higher part of its practical range, crossing higher than the alto voices That this isn't as big of a deal as you might think for trombonists, depending upon the difficulty level you are writing for. If it is a ...


5

If you look at the symbol Cmaj13 in sort of nicely reveals what is essential to voice this chord. You obviously need tonic for 'C', then to reflect 'maj' you need the notes that define 'maj' quality of the chord - and that's maj3 and maj7. Then you have '13' - the defining extension. All other notes are not neccessary to get a maj13 sound. So to sum up, you ...


5

Yes, this so-called "voice crossing" is one of the many things Bach did that would receive a red mark if he did it in a first-semester theory course. You'll also find moments where the alto goes above the soprano or the tenor moves below the bass. But keep in mind that Bach wasn't writing according to rules. Rather, these rules were deduced later through a ...


5

True, most chords are clear in their make-up from the name. However, sometimes, there needs to be an extra note added and it's more clear to write that at the end of a chord's name. Csus2, for example, needs C D G, as the sus knocks out the 3rd of the chord, E. But what about if we wanted to have a D note as well? C E G and D. That's where the 'add' part ...


4

Well, it took me 3 months, but I've got some answers. (Yes, how shameless of me to answer my own question.) Here are some voicings I found that satisfy my original qualifications (keeping Root, 3rd, 7th, and highest extension, not too painful). These, of course, can be moved up and down the fretboard to different roots. 5-3-6-5 C9 4-5-3-7 G13 (also 4-5-5-...


4

From my experience, half barre chord and simplified chord leave some of your fingers free and you will have flexibility to add some more harmony to the play. Beside, sometimes you don't want too much ringing note: maybe it will be too thick and noisy for your play, so you ignore some of them by play half barre/simplified chord. This is also an explanation ...


4

How about this? If you have to cover the bass as well, fit in as much as you can with the RH. Two versions. A skeleton voicing and a fuller one.


4

Here are the rootless I've seen commonly give for 'Evans' voicings. The numbers below the staff are the chord tones. So, you will see on the G7 the 13th and also the omission of the root and the fifth. A B https://jazzpianoschool.com/what-are-rootless-voicings-and-how-to-use-them/ EDIT I should have added some explanation: root: normally the root ...


4

By definition, playing a Gm7/B♭ chord means the bass voice must sing a B♭. If you want to modify the second chord so that the bass voice doesn't jump by a seventh, try bringing that B♭ down an octave (or raising everything else appropriately) so the B♭ resolves up to a C. That should sound much smoother. Alternatively, you could invert your V chord. I ...


4

In general, when you have two Roman Numerals on top of each other they are known as secondary chords. They are chords that have function outside of the current key. The most common of these are secondary dominants which V7/V correlates to temporarily tonicizing V via raising the 3rd of ii7. To this specific instance of iii/IV, the author is saying that they ...


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