7

CMaj7/D is D G C E B, which is a D13sus chord, not D11. It's fine to play a 7sus chord in place of a dominant 7th chord in jazz, and of course fine to play 9sus and 13sus chords here, too. The substitution just has a different sound; I suppose you could say that this is its "purpose". There might be potential problems if someone else in the band ...


6

The 'purpose' is to create a strong dissonance! Music tends to go from tension to release, the release being giving a feeling of relief, if you like, after some angst. That angst, here, is produced by a dissonant chord. As ex nihilo says, Cmaj7/D has the same notes as Dsus13. Dsus13 replaces the F♯ with G, but even if someone else plays an F♯ over it, it ...


6

I would notate the entire two beats as an Eb augmented chord. There is ample precedent for using enharmonically equivalent notation to improve readability, especially where double-accidentals are concerned. The chord functions as a pivot. Initially, I agree, it's B augmented, inheriting its root from the preceding chord. But it also functions to lead ...


5

Block Chords vs. Broken Chords The term block chord refers to any chord in which all of the notes are sounded simultaneously. This is in contrast to broken chords in which notes are sounded sequentially. These terms refer to the manner of execution of the individual notes within a chord, but are a separate concept from chord voicings. [In] Block chord style ...


3

The idea behind CM7/D, Dsus13, etc. are well discussed. However, what's actually happening in the recording is a bit different from that. "Oleo" is based on Rhythm changes in Bb, so the expected/characteristic bridge would be D7 / / / | D7 / / / | G7 / / / | G7 / / / | C7 / / / | C7 / / / | F7 / / / | F7 / / / | That is, a sequence of V-I ...


3

Freddie Green had fairly unique style. He would fret complete chord voicings but mute most of the strings and only have one string ringing (mostly the D string). With the right hand he would mostly play straight quarters. This makes his contribution a mixture of rhythm instrument keeping the beat while at the same time playing single line. I'm guessing that ...


1

Yes, the VI chord is a really tricky one. Especially in minor, every single voice has a possible error: either parallel fifths, parallel octaves, or an augmented second. In general, that VI chord, when it either moves to V or comes after V, is going to have a doubled chordal third. You did this perfectly. But also, whenever you're moving to a V chord, you ...


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