15

In general, when you only have a limited amount of voices and you need to leave out a note in a chord, the Perfect 5th is the first to go. A Perfect 5th doesn't typically add a lot of color to a chord and thus typically when playing a chord it's viewed as OK to omit without changing the nature of a chord. I will say for this specific chord, there's no reason ...


13

This vocal style comes from the American traditions of close harmony. As popular music (and the radio) came into being in the 20th century, it took influence from the styles of its times, just as any emerging style of music does. Looking back even further, the roots of this vocal style can be traced back to the 1800s and are likely also traceable to African ...


9

From a jazz perspective, whenever a chord symbol contains an upper extension like 9, 11, or 13, the 3rd and 7th are implied. Moreover, in jazz, the chord C7 has many well-known voicings, including Bb-D-E-A and Bb-D-E-G. So if a lead sheet goes to the trouble of writing C13 when C7 would suffice, then this usually implies that the 13th carries special ...


9

It is common to omit a note from a chord, especially on a guitar, where 3-4 note voicings commonly sound the best, and also it's not always convenient to play all notes. In many cases perfect fifth is a note that doesn't add much to the chord and it can be omitted as in this case. So yes, this is a perfectly valid voicing of E7 chord.


8

It is common to omit the 5th in a seventh chord. In the case of E7, that means leaving out the B. E is the root G♯ is the third B is the fifth D is the seventh Omitting the fifth is also commonly done in minor seventh and major seventh chords.


8

Well, they sound less dissonant for the reason that you said - that the frequencies of the harmonics in the group of notes sounding simultaneously clash less. This graph from https://sethares.engr.wisc.edu/consemi.html shows how pairs of sinewaves less than a minor third apart give an impression of 'roughness': However, having notes further apart doesn't ...


7

CMaj7/D is D G C E B, which is a D13sus chord, not D11. It's fine to play a 7sus chord in place of a dominant 7th chord in jazz, and of course fine to play 9sus and 13sus chords here, too. The substitution just has a different sound; I suppose you could say that this is its "purpose". There might be potential problems if someone else in the band ...


6

While these terms are most commonly used in introductory textbooks to describe three-note chords or four-part harmony (with bass treated as a sort of separate part of the texture), I've definitely seen the terms used with other types of chords on occasion. The implication, to me, with "close position" is that all notes are clustered on adjacent ...


6

I think your confusion comes from the fact that you're generating sine waves for comparison. Sine waves are great for understanding constructive and destructive interference, but they're a pretty far cry from what a piano generates. On any "real world" instrument the sound wave produced is composed of both the fundamental pitch and all of the ...


6

The 'purpose' is to create a strong dissonance! Music tends to go from tension to release, the release being giving a feeling of relief, if you like, after some angst. That angst, here, is produced by a dissonant chord. As ex nihilo says, Cmaj7/D has the same notes as Dsus13. Dsus13 replaces the F♯ with G, but even if someone else plays an F♯ over it, it ...


6

I would notate the entire two beats as an Eb augmented chord. There is ample precedent for using enharmonically equivalent notation to improve readability, especially where double-accidentals are concerned. The chord functions as a pivot. Initially, I agree, it's B augmented, inheriting its root from the preceding chord. But it also functions to lead ...


5

Yes, this is often done. Should it be? Maybe. If you want THAT voicing - a G major triad over first an E then an A bass note - you could convey more useful information by calling them G/E and G/A. (And you could convey even MORE useful information by using notation.) Some will say that chord symbols SHOULDN'T try to include voicing information. Others ...


5

Block Chords vs. Broken Chords The term block chord refers to any chord in which all of the notes are sounded simultaneously. This is in contrast to broken chords in which notes are sounded sequentially. These terms refer to the manner of execution of the individual notes within a chord, but are a separate concept from chord voicings. [In] Block chord style ...


4

I think the string crossings encourage the players to make each note extremely expressive. You can see this especially in the 2nd violin part, with its jumps from F# to A# to D natural to E# to B. It would take a lot of browbeating from the conductor to get the strings to play a simple downward scale with such intensity. And the viola cello/bass crossings ...


4

The note A is the leading tone in Bb major. Since the chord is required to be in first inversion, the A in the bass is necessary. That means that the tenor needs to be changed to C or F.


4

Inversions are determined by the bass note of the chord. The chord third in the bass is a first inversion, chord fifth, second inversion, chord seventh third inversion, etc. Sometimes the top harmony note will be mentioned but that harmonically doesn't make much difference. (It may make a big difference in playing though and in the sound.) Inversions are ...


3

There's a principle that says the harmony should be complete within each section of the orchestra - strings, wind and brass. There's also a quoted example (but I forget where) of a massive tutti chord including the major 3rd just once, in a 3rd trumpet! What you DON'T have to do is follow the rules of Bach-style 4-voice harmony.


3

The "rules" for doubling stem from the desire in polyphony to keep voices independent from each other. Since the third of a major chord is often a leading tone, we don't double it, because then two voices would both move together to the tonic in the following chord. This same principle applies to all "tendency" tones. For example, we ...


3

Any chord remains the same chord regardless the order or position of its notes. So A-C-E is always A minor -- and thus the iv chord in this context -- no matter what pitch is on the bottom, middle, or top. As long as the only pitches involved are A-C-E, it's A minor. The inversion of the chord is determined by the lowest pitch. In the case of A minor, A ...


3

Is this... ...really the chord example? There seems more to talk about with that chord than whether it's in open or close voicing! Anyway, if the issue is one of sticking hard and fast to a definition, the thing I notice is the question brings in a matter of pitch class. The idea is any voices within a pitch class should be treated the same (or apparently ...


3

In any chord, certain notes have certain importance. The root is important as it gives the name to the chord. In this case, E7. The third is important as without it, the chord will be neither major nor minor. An important factor in harmony. This one contains G♯, making it a major based chord. Since it's a 7th chord, it needs that 7th part. Here a D note. ...


3

The first chord (ex. 3.12, m.4) is spelled C Ab Eb--not sure how that is a chord based on scale degree 5 (Bb); The next chord (ex. 3.12, m.4)is spelled Db A F. The first chord is inverted. It is an A♭ major chord in first inversion. The second chord is actually D♭ A♭ F, because the flat on the A from the first chord still applies until the end of the ...


3

Walter Piston gives this same rule in Harmony. For first inversion chords double a tonal degree. The tonal degrees are ^1, ^4, and ^5. The idea is doubling a tonal degree will reinforce the sense of tonality. Let's make a table of the results for diatonic triads in C major... I6 => C or G, not E ii6 => F, maybe D, not A iii6 => G, not E ...


3

Chord symbols are open to interpretation regardless of how specific one tries to be about naming them. It is fairly common for players and arrangers to take liberties like omitting a root or 5th, adding a 9th, etc. Both chords in your examples are essentially V9sus4 chords. I think that will be the perception in either case, regardless of the notes in the ...


3

Probably because the composer wrote that chord when the music was composed. He probably wanted that particular sound or feel related to the melody. So whoever published the sheet music has seen the original music and therefore seen what chords the composer wrote in relation to the melodic line. The colour of the melodic line is closely connected to the ...


3

You're looking at what is called a "lead sheet". The intention is to provide the melody and basic harmony (chords) of a song. The chords are derived from the originally published song, or, in some cases, the song was composed initially as simply a set of chords with a melody. For example, Miles Davis's "So What" and John Coltrane's "...


3

The idea behind CM7/D, Dsus13, etc. are well discussed. However, what's actually happening in the recording is a bit different from that. "Oleo" is based on Rhythm changes in Bb, so the expected/characteristic bridge would be D7 / / / | D7 / / / | G7 / / / | G7 / / / | C7 / / / | C7 / / / | F7 / / / | F7 / / / | That is, a sequence of V-I ...


3

Freddie Green had fairly unique style. He would fret complete chord voicings but mute most of the strings and only have one string ringing (mostly the D string). With the right hand he would mostly play straight quarters. This makes his contribution a mixture of rhythm instrument keeping the beat while at the same time playing single line. I'm guessing that ...


2

This site https://bartoszmilewski.com/2020/05/25/guitar-decomposed-3-moving-sideways/ does a great job of exploring the relationships between the CAGED shapes. The author is a noted programmer and mathematician who is applying some of those skills to guitar. In terms of a system to analyse the voicings, if looking from the bass I tend to think about the ...


2

I'd say forget about the chords. The left hand is obviously based on quartal harmony with the stacked fourths, where any member can function as the root. Just picking out a couple examples between bars 29 and 30, he moves chromatically half a step up in the left and right hands (truck driver modulation), also between bars 66 and 67, where the stack fourths ...


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