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18

As @user1079505 points out, recorded versions of the piece include an E#. This begs the question, though: how do they know to play E#? One way would be a more modern edition that contains the correction. But that still begs the question of how the editor(s) knew. How does an editor or performer know that E# is correct? The holograph manuscript Gottschalk's ...


18

It's a mistake. It should be E# instead of D#. It's clearly audible in the recording: Possible reason for the mistake is that D# is much more commonly used than E#. However it's a very reasonable use. The section is in the key of Gb. The first half of the measure is Gb chord, while the second half is D chord. F# is a chord ...


15

You seem to have confused the concepts of (1) chord, (2) scale, and (3) key. Your teacher gave you the E minor scale because of the E minor key, not because of the E minor chord. :) Confusing? Let's see: The E minor chord, abbreviated as Em, has three notes: E, G and B. The "E minor scale"... you probably mean the E natural minor scale. It has the ...


11

Chord tones and not chord tones When improvising against any chord, the "primary" notes are those in the chord itself. Other notes are more or less decorative: adding color, passing from one chord note to another, or serving as embellishments to a particular note. An example of chord tones and not chord notes and how to use them Take an A minor ...


9

Yes, it is Gm7 (or Gm9) with missing G. This is called rootless voicing, and it is a common way of playing chords in piano jazz arrangements. It is assumed that the root is played by some other instrument, like bass. It doesn't need to be doubled, and if doubled it may even clash. Please note that the rootless version of the chord still contains the two most ...


8

Playing transcriptions can be beneficial to any player but because of the abundance of information and technology out there, learning to play something someone else already played is becoming much too commonplace in my opinion. This is sometimes at the expense of learning proper technique and vocabulary. I don’t know you and am not making any judgements here,...


7

These minor v chords are not typically viewed as dominant in function, no. Instead, they most often function as passing chords. Imagine we pass from i through v6 down to VI (or even iv6). In these cases the v chords very clearly do not reach the hierarchical level of a "real" dominant and instead are just voice-leading conduits leading from one ...


7

Some pretext: In my answer, a tab, short for tablature, is a form of music notation for an entire song that plots the individual notes marked as fret numbers on each string. A chord diagram is the graphic that shows where to place the fingers on the fretboard in order to play a specific chord. Different forms of music notation, including sheet music, lead ...


6

Assuming your transcription is correct, that is not a ♯V chord, but a ♭VI chord. This is borrowed from the tonic minor and provides a powerful pull to the dominant (because of the half-step-downward resolution of the ♭VI chord's root, third, and fifth).


6

The third option is best: re-notate the tremolo in each bar. Depending on how long the tremolo continues, a "repeat previous measure" sign could be used. The tremolo should be notated using the proper "full measure" note-type for the time signature. For example, using whole notes in a 2/4 bar would be incorrect. This is also demonstrated ...


5

With Roman numeral analysis you can put sharps and flats on the Roman numerals to show the root is altered. But, while a altered dominant root with ♭V makes sense a ♯V does not. Here is why... Usually such alteration are about borrowed chords or mode mixture. For example, in a major key you can have a ♭VII borrowed from mixolydian. When you add flats in the ...


5

I don’t play open tunings, but your assessment makes sense to me for any open tuning. Since the guitar is tuned such that all notes played at the same fret are chord tones, you could play any number of combinations of the strings at a single fret and they would at least be partials or inversions of the same chord. So in short, yes.


4

The video is misleading at this point, because the left hand (or bass part) has been left out. The left hand (or bass) would be playing G, so the total chord would be G-Bb-D-F-A, which, strictly speaking, is a Gm9. The added 9th, the A is a "safe" addition in this situation and adds nice color to the chord. It's not a Bb7, because that chord has Ab ...


4

Let's look at this a different way. You are thinking that the notes from one scale maybe won't fit four different chords. How about if notes from that same scale won't even fit the root chord in question? Key is Em. Play the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th, or 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th - all in simple order, on the 4 beats, over the chord of Em. You may agree that they ...


4

Practice slowly but accurately. Like REALLY slowly, if that's the speed you can be accurate at. You can do this yourself. If a particular section is a problem, look at your fingering choices, hand positions etc. and check you're not sabotaging yourself. You'll find a teacher very useful here.


4

Try out this "technique" by analyzing 9th, 11th and 13th chords as a sum of 2 chords: ii/V or vii7/V and ii7/V IV7/V. This way will help you constructing, writing, reading and fingering these chords. Edited: 2t chords => 2 chords


4

The whole verse is made up from 2-5-1s, as stated in the clip. So it's not surprising that after Am7♭5 - D7 - it's Gm, of some sort - rather than B♭, of some sort. Were it B♭, the preceding chord would more likely be F(7). The fact that the chord shown is in 3rd inversion is really neither here nor there. The bassist at that point would most likely play a G, ...


4

Essentially, "yes." But you really don't want to think of it as "dominant in the scale of the destination chord." Instead think of it as the dominant to the destination tonic. The simple reason being that, using the given example with a secondary dominant of A7, the A7 is dominant in both D major and D minor. Also, in the sense that "...


4

In a secondary dominant such as "V of V", you think about the "of V" being a temporary I. For example if you go to Dm using a secondary II-V of Dm, then you do it as if in the key of Dm, for example Em7 and A7. We say that we're "in" a key. But not "in a scale". "In D minor" means in the key of D minor. Key ...


4

The idea of DADF♯AD is just that. Use the bottom 3, barred wherever, to make a 'power chord'. Use all three notes from a major triad, barred wherever, to make that major chord. Thicken it by doubling any of the notes, particularly on the 6th, 4th and top strings (basically including M3 found on the 3rd string). Any major chord can be played using a simple ...


3

Any chord has specific notes which make up that chord. Any scale has no bearing at all on that fact. So the question itself isn't clear. In whatever key, A7, for example, comprises A C♯ E G. Even in a key with no sharps, but flats instead. So the chord A7 will have those 4 notes even in D♭, with 5 flats. EDIT: actually using your example, we quite often DO ...


3

(Expanding on Dekkadeci's answer) the bVI7, sometimes with a few modifications, is a common predecessor to the V chord (perhaps through the I64 to avoid parallels or just to extend the piece). These are the "Augmented Sixth" chords (with geographic names). There are two musical "tricks" happening, the half-step move from the b6 to the 5 ...


3

Having thought about this for a while (and being unsatisfied with the lack of detail in my assertion that a D sounds more idiomatic than a C♯), I am posting an answer to elaborate. My reasons for calling this chord a (modified) IV6 chord include: I've always heard the F♯ to E interval as an unresolved 7-6 suspension. Typical figures for a bass line ...


3

Yes, absolutely. You see Drop-D or similar tunings on, for example, metal songs just so you have one-finger power chords. And yes, you get different voicings from different strings. Playing a six-string "cowboy" chord will give you multiple roots, fifths and thirds. Sometimes that's great — it's the great folky sound — but you don't need to play ...


2

It's F# minor without the fifth. The E is a pedal tone. One way to establish this, is to play the opening measure without the E. The overall sense of harmony is unaffected, which helps demonstrate that the E is independent of the harmonic progression even though it is often a participant in it. The core harmonic progression is I: First measure V65 (or viio):...


2

This is a coda at the end of a movement. The (sort-of) PAC moment that concluded the recapitulation occurred right before the excerpt given here. In codas, it is very common (even sometimes before Beethoven) to have a series of moves to the subdominant and/or dominant, often all over a tonic pedal (or something like that), without another strong root-...


2

The B major scale contains B, C#, E, F#, which happen to be all the notes of A major pentatonic, minus the root. The G# is the 7th of A, playing might give the chord an Amaj7 feel. The D# (#11) and the A# (b9) definitely provide some tension, with the former providing a lydian feel, which is common enough in some genres. My guess is it sounds good because it ...


2

I'm writing another answer, after reading the comments, and doing some research. I am going to delete my previous answer, as I now realize it's misleading. The measure comes from an arrangement of part of March no. 1 from "Pomp and Circumstance" by Edward Elgar. If the book doesn't mention it, it's not good. Elgar composed the marches for an ...


2

Whilst it looks like a tie, it must be a slur, which ought to be over the top notes rather than under it all. It seems to be a poor example of writing, as there doesn't need any tie to be there; the first C could have been written as a minim, with the stem down, indicating a different voice, which it should be anyway. Were the first C only a quaver, it could'...


1

This is very reminiscent of classic Brazilian music from composers like Jobim et al. It makes use of a good dose of parallel minor chords, modal interchange and also lots of inner voice movement, all of which are typical to that style. Another element is the use of m6 chords which can be used either for inner voice movement (7-6) or can also be used and ...


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