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21

If you are wanting to stick with standard tuning, then obviously there's no note lower than the low E in the open E chord - but as a chord, this D/F# (or 'first inversion' of D) might give some impression of being lower, partly because two of the strings (A and D) play a note that is a tone lower than in the open E chord: %2/.0/.0/.2/.3/.2/[D/F#] Here's a ...


18

Use a Drop-D tuning along with the traditional open D-major chord. Or alternatively try a DADGAD tuning and finger accordingly.


17

"If I skip any note, its gonna make it another chord..." No. First: despite the 'pile of 3rds' method of constructing chords in our textbooks, in a 13th chord the 5th may be omitted, the 9th is often omitted and the 11th is ALWAYS omitted. (OK, ALWAYS is just asking for people to come up with exceptions. But it's near enough, and we're talking about the ...


11

My gut assumption given your example lead sheet is that the empty slash presumes that the base chord to the left of it will still be used. For example, in your example, the "A /C#" would mean "A A/C#".


9

The standard tuning of the bass strings are the same as the bottom four of standard guitar tuning - E, A, D, G - but one octave lower. The tones of chords are the same between the instruments except they sound one octave lower on bass. So A2 E3 A3 C#4 on guitar will sound A1 E2 A2 C#3 on bass guitar, and the fretting can be the same. In terms of how to ...


8

If I'm understanding the question correctly, it sounds like you are describing what is called appropriately enough, "Chord Melody" which is a popular method to harmonize a melody line often seen in jazz arrangements, but can be used in almost any style of popular music. I'm guessing you got your hands on some of those kind of arrangements, but I can assure ...


8

...How should I do this? You have to re-tune the guitar strings so that they are low enough to play the notes you want. The technical terms for this is scordatura although in common guitarist lingo it's usually called alternate tuning. ...I am writing a piece You need to know how to indicate it in your score. There are two basic ways: tab and staff ...


8

Technically, yes. Extended chords are created by a process of stacking thirds, where you continue to add notes from the scale, proceeding in intervals of a third (of whatever flavour) to the highest note. A 13th chord, therefore, is a seven-note chord that theoretically contains all notes of the diatonic scale. In practice, however, most often used ...


8

Bassically, the bass guitar wasn't designed or expected to have chords played on it. The notes are low, and even playing a simple triad often doesn't sound good. Muddy describes it well. So, using a guitar and a bass, it's best to stick to one note on the bass, and the chord, or the rest of it, on the guitar. Thus, the bass could play one of the triad notes ...


7

With chord symbols alone, no. Chord symbols are not designed to show exact voicings of chords. The most they can show is inversion which is denoted by a slash. Typically when voicings must be exact, a more detailed notation will be used like in sheet music or tablature.


7

Let me first show you the most common (and good sounding) voicings of 13th chords on the guitar. I take as an example a C13 (from low E to high e): 8 X 8 9 10 10 (chord tones: 1, b7, 3, 13, 9) 8 X 8 7 5 5 (chord tones: 1, b7, 9, 3, 13) X 3 2 3 3 5 (chord tones: 1, 3, b7, 9, 13) They all have five notes (instead of seven) because you always leave out the ...


7

I'm not certain if this is what you're after, but you may be interested in the concept of the melodic-harmonic divorce in rock music. In short, it's a theory about this repertoire that states that a melody and its underlying harmonies don't always work in tandem the way they traditionally did (like, for instance, in a Christmas Carol), with dissonant pitches ...


6

Some chords (at least in Common Practice Period harmony) cannot be named out of context. Some trivial examples: F-Ab-Db-F is a Db major chord in and of itself but if resolved to G, it may be a Neapolitan Sixth. The collection: Ab-C-Eb-F# is a German Sixth if resolved to G-C-E-G thence to G-B-D-G(or F). It's a dominant seventh if resolved to Db-F-Ab or ...


5

Two things to start off: 1) If you have something over F minor, you've got a polychord. B over F minor is B-D♯-F♯ over F-A♭-C. From your question I'm guessing you meant "F minor over B", which says it's an F minor triad over a B bass note. 2) If the bass note isn't a tone of the chord it's being played under, it's a "non-harmonic tone". ...


5

The tension from a chord depends on context. The section on Ludmila Uhlela's book at thereelscore.com has a nice outline about the perceived tensions in various styles. Trivial example is the major-minor seventh which is a medium dissonance when used as a dominant seventh: V7-I or G7-C whereas as s German Sixth Ge6-I64-I or Ab7 (with the Gb enharmonically ...


4

Don Latarski, in his (highly recommended) book Chord Embellishments for Guitar defines Benson Shapes as: I don't even know Don Latarski but if you think this is useful, check out his other chord embellishments and support him.


4

When I write out the chord on the staff do I note the 5th as Db or a C#? Does it matter? If this is the fifth of the F♯(♭9) chord, then you would want to notate this as a C♯. This is because the fifth of the chord is so named because it is a fifth above the root. Since the root is some kind of F, the fifth must be spelled as some kind of C. ...


4

Using standard tuning, it's really not going to happen. To make it sound lower, the bottom string at least is going to be tuned to D, which means that any other notes played on that string then need to be fretted two frets higher, which may/not cause other problems. By tuning the whole guitar down a tone, but playing the rest of the song two frets higher, ...


4

There must be many, many chords using the notes in any given scale. Yes. If we use C major as the given scale, we could make lots and lots of chords, like : BEF, BCD, EFC, etc. Depending on how we run the combinations we could have as many as 210 three-tone chords! But, many of them will not sound good, like BCF. In major key music the follow lists the ...


4

The chord in the box is a "French" augmented sixth chord (A-C#-D#-F##), which resolves to G# major as V/C#m. The crucial voiceleading is the augmented sixth A-F## resolving to the octave on G#. (This is a good example of why we need double sharps; the interval sounds like A-G, but it is not a seventh! If it were, the "G" would have to fall back to F#.) ...


4

Those intervals [of chords] hold a position in a 12TET interval ranking from most consonant to most dissonant. No. The problem is making a general statement like that and then trying to make it apply to your new composition method. If the premise about chord interval tension where true, then the chords C major and G major would have exactly the same ...


3

..focus on the 6th and 5th strings [to locate roots] and use barre chords My guitar lessons where a long time ago, but my memory is this is what I was taught, even if it was explicitly explained. You don't even need to go up to the 12th fret. But, I feel like the result is my internal, mental map of the fret board is like this... ...there is a huge gap! ...


3

Using the E(m) and A(m) shapes, the chords in a key come in two L-shapes. Two of the major chords will be an E and an A-shape on the same fret (one of which is the I-chord), and then the third major chord is the E-shape 2 frets lower or the A-shape two frets higher (depending on which was the I-chord). The three minor chords form a similar L-shape. In a ...


3

In any chord, the root is the most important. Without that, the chord has no name! Next comes the third, defining either major or minor. The fifth is often omitted, as its sound can be heard in the second harmonic of the root. Then onto the 7th. Important again, as there are three different 7th notes, each blending with the others to make the sound of the ...


3

When we play chords with that many notes we have no choice but to drop a few. This occurs in music theory too. It is a common practice to drop the 5th from a dominant 7th chord, and double the root, for example C7 played as {C, E, Bb, C}. This is often played on guitar in the first position as (x, 3, 2, 3, 1, x). I'm assuming my notation is self ...


3

Beethoven actually uses them quite functionally in the first movement of Eroica, right in the beginning of the development. Here, the Ab augmented triad resolves into G7 with Ab moving down to G and E natural up to F. Then with the same melody he moves from C major to F minor, then again from Ab augmented to G7, where he stays for four bars before modulating ...


3

The second most definitely, as it resolves in the next bar to C minor, G7 being the V of Cm, the key of the excerpt. The first one isn't G7 - it comprises B D F♯ G, making it probably Gmaj7. (The F note is sharpened because of the previous F note's accidental). And that goes straight to F minor, which isn't what dominant seventh chords generally do - ...


3

First of all you can play anything, it does not have to follow a set of rules. Music harmony theory expresses a set of guide lines for western multi-voice music. When it comes to a single chord there are no "avoid" notes (I realize I may be contradicting some advanced jazz chord textbook but I stand by the statement as it relates to artistic choices as ...


2

Assuming that after the B7 you return to chords in G major, as Dom mentioned, the ear normally likes the minimum number of note differences. If you are doing pop/rock type of music, I would suggest the E ascending melodic minor scale, { E, F#, G, A, B, C#, D# } to keep the number of new notes at a minimum while avoiding the minor third leap between C and D#....


2

Because the chords is wrong. Someone transposed it from Eb to C and forgot to transpose this chord. Here is a better version https://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/tab/misc_cartoons/neon_genesis_evangelion_-_a_cruel_angels_thesis_chords_460280 Try a Bdim7 instead. But as the comments say: it sounds more like a suspended chord to me.


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