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15

It's actually a suspension, which is to say that the actual chord is F Minor (F, A-flat, C, in first inversion) but the G and B-flat are held over from the previous chord before moving to F and A-flat. Dissonant suspensions resolving to consonant chords are very common in Baroque music. In jazz, 9th chords are treated as normal chords, so a G#maj9 might ...


11

It's common to omit some notes when forming a chord (for various reasons; depends on the instrument and the composer). The aforementioned chord is a Fm7 (no5), which means that you play the notes that form the Fm7 chord (F A♭ C E♭), but you omit the 5th (C), thus getting Fm7 (no 5) or the notes F A♭ E♭. One of the most common chord ...


8

Because this is an open chord shape. That means the fingers do some of the work, and the nut does the rest. From https://fretello.com/skill/c-major-chord-open-position/: We can see that the fingers hold down two Cs and an E. The 'O' shapes above the nut show the work it is doing for us - "holding down" another E, and a G. (Well really it's the tuners and ...


7

Obviously, the common simple chord names are useful. E.g. you might ask a guitarist to play a Cm followed by G7. That would be much easier than calling out the notes that you wanted. Such chord names don't directly represent sets of notes - they are are abstractions of sets of notes, and useful because... They tell us that we should think of the piece in ...


7

He is doing this: Cm Db => Fm Gb => Bbm Cb => Ebm Fb => ... What I hear is a continuous modulation up in perfect fourths. The chords Cm Db Fm can be heard in the key of F minor. The F minor chord is then re-interpreted as the Vm chord of the next key (Bbm) etc. So what you have is key Fm: Cm Db Fm Bbm: Fm Gb Bbm Ebm: Bbm Cb ...


6

When attempting theory exams... Ask the person who will grade the exam. Whatever rule they want you to follow for the exam will be contradicted by actual practice. You can easily find examples of a root position tonic chord with the third doubled and the fifth omitted. Walter Piston's Harmony has a simple rule: in root position double the root, for ...


6

There is a difference in what composers do and what is acceptable in a theory exam. In an exam, usually you don't double the third of a major chord, but you can double it if the chord is minor. Doubling the root or the fifth is the safe choice. To see what note of the chord you'd double, you have to see the preceding as well as the following chord. You'll ...


6

The notation starting in the second measure, isn't a tie, but rather a slur. More specifically, it's a phrasing slur indicating to play everything within that slur as a continual line and within a single phrase. You only need to play that quarter-note A in the second measure for the duration of one beat. And your intuition regarding the brackets in the ...


5

It's said that a good player playing without backing can make listeners aware of where they are in a sequence, and the 12 bar sequence is no different. The better fitting notes that work over the I don't especially work best over the IV or the V. Often I hear players 'widdling' over 12 bar blues, using the notes from the blues scale at random. It sort of ...


5

In typical melody writing the melody often uses tones that match the chords along with the careful use of non-chord tones. But in 12-bar blues the general feeling is: any note of the blues scale can be played over any chord in the progression, so the rule of thumb above doesn't really apply to the blues. Surely, the tonic and dominant tones will be natural ...


5

As the other answer point out you mis-identified the suspension as the end of the phrase, but the resolution is the end of the phrase. Bach's Prelude #1 from the Well Tempered Clavier, book I is super clear example of extended chords and dissonances. This particular prelude started as an instruction piece for is some Wilhelm so it's original purpose is ...


5

The main point of a V chord is the leading note. That's the main reason the harmonic minor scale notes get used often. There is no key of 'B natural minor', there is a scale, but in a minor key, the first 5 notes in any minor scale are identical, after which the notes from the parallel major or natural minor are game to be used. F♯ chord doesn't exist ...


5

It could be G - B - D - F# ( G + Bm) which is the Gmaj7 chord // G can be something else besides the bass note, and then it would be a Gmaj7 chord in some inversion. With B as the bass note it would be Gmaj7 in first inversion. Something else that is really common in harmony, that can easily be done in your chord progression is to play the G chord, then ...


5

Depending on how this is voiced, this F♯ might be better understood not as a chord tone but as a passing tone from the G in the first chord to the E in the last chord. For example: Some musicians have a habit of making a chord out of every vertical stacking of pitches. But sometimes (perhaps most of the time?) there's a melodic explanation that is ...


5

This seems so obvious I might be missing something. If there's an open string that produces the note needed for a chord, it gets played open. Guitars aren't always played using fretted notes. there are six notes there already which might be chosen as appropriate. I tend to approach chords from a different angle. Cmaj. needs one/some of C E and G. Let's find ...


5

@MattL already pointed out the three chord pattern. With Roman numerals the basic harmonic template is v VI i. That's a minor v. The chords are diatonic, but technically non-functional. I only mention this as a kind of progression. When chords are treated non-functionally you can use unconventional root progressions that aren't like familiar patterns such ...


4

The rule comes down to two things: voice leading and avoiding parallel fifths/octaves. In an SATB arrangement you're going to double a pitch, or leave one voice with nothing to do. Each voice should be moving smoothly, and generally following the guidelines of counterpoint. You'll need to look at what each voice is doing, and look at what chord comes next ...


4

To a beginner it can be confusing. Understanding even what a chord is! To a lot of us, a basic chord - the one most used in music - is called a triad. It contains (no surprise) three notes. Let's take a scale. C major will do. C D E F G A B C.The triad that makes up C major chord is 1,3 and 5 of that scale. So, C E G are the notes making up C major. Let's ...


4

The X chord could be an Fm7 and that would perfectly fit in the E♭ scale with the other chords in the progression you mentioned. Simplified explanation: The diatonic triads in E♭ scale are: E♭ Fm Gm A♭ B♭ Cm Ddim.


4

I think the wording of this question is some how obscuring the actual problem. Surely you taught the students the open strings, what pitches they are. If the student plays each note of the chord separately and says out loud the name of each tone including the open strings it should be clear to them a G gets played. All three tones of the triad are present....


3

The sense of an exam is that you will have the chance to show that you know more than the experts. That you are able to discuss a question and not searching the one only correct answer, to demonstrate that you have the competence to break rules and argue why your point is also possible and defend it. Books are often written by a follower or disciples of a ...


3

There is a perfect fit for this chord: CM7b9 with interval set 0,1,4,7,11 Double Harmonic: C Db E F G Ab B chord: C Db E G B There is one inversion without clashing note functions GM6b5add11 with interval set 0,4,5,6,9 Asian (5th mode of Double Harmonic): G Ab B C Db E F chord: G B C Db E


3

What does minor/major mean? Always try to understand the etymology and the roots of terms. Looking up wikipedia they explain that major means large and minor small. This makes me assume that in English beginners of music are not always taught or later they aren’t aware that this is concerning the lower third of a triad. In German we would call these ...


3

As I understand it, this question has to do with chord voicing. In practice the note most often doubled is the tonic. This reinforces the overall sound of the chord and stresses the key-center. Doubling the fifth strengthens the "stability" of the chord, and doubling the third emphasizes the major or minor aspect of the chord. When we choose to double notes ...


3

Generally a sus chord loses its 3rd note in favour of either a 2nd or a 4th. So it will be labelled sus2 or sus4. Csus2 is comprised of C D G, and Csus4 is comprisesd of C F G. Occasionally I come across Csus. What the heck is that suppused to mean? Answer is sometimes in the dots, if it's a piano work, but in amongst guitar chords could be either! ...


3

This is the inversion of the VII degree (c#eg) of D. A is passing note to B. Analyzing the short 8th as V7 is not wrong but in respect to the horizontal line and the following subdominant I would ignore to analyze hear a dominant as in my mind the harmonical function gets violated by the theory of functional harmonics. The goal of a task like this isn‘t to ...


3

The chords and the harmony are quite important for writing a blues melody: Bars 1-2: write a motif starting from the root leaping up (minor 3rd, or 4th, 5th or dim. 5th descending the notes of the blues scale). 3-4: repeat the bars 1-2 with a minor 7th as final tone. 5-6: transpose the motif of bars 1-2 up a 4th or keep it on the same pitch by ...


3

There are many many different ways to write a blues melody, but none of them involve "applying the blues scale" What you really need to do is listen to a bunch of blues, and learn how to play the melodies. Then, use what you've learned to write the blues. "The blues scale" has almost nothing to do with the blues though. It's just a sort of facsimile ...


3

You would notate the exact voicing of a chord (open or closed) by writing it out note by note. Chord symbols were not designed to show the exact voicings only give a general sense of what the harmony is. The bass note is the only exact voicing that is notate and this is because the bass note greatly defines the overall harmony. Think of it as short hand ...


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