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18

You are actually playing a Cb major, enharmonic equivalent of B. It sounds good because Cb can be seen as borrowed from the parallel minor (Eb minor), so you get that juicy, unexpected sound. It works because it resolves back to Eb (in second inversion) this way: Gb -> G Eb -> Eb Cb -> Bb You can notate the chord as bVI. Experiment in other keys as well! ...


10

A minor scale with the raised sixth degree is called the Dorian scale. It is actually a mode of the diatonic scale, which is the same as starting the major scale from the second degree, or starting minor from the fourth degree. As a sidenote, G F B♭ could be considered a G minor 7th chord without the fifth. The fifth can often be omitted since it's not ...


8

If you are basing your harmony off of F minor, this chord progression makes a lot of sense especially wanting to use C major instead of C minor. This is very rooted in the traditional study of harmony by weaving though the 3 minor scales which are F natural minor, F harmonic minor, and F melodic minor which gives the following sets of notes: F natrual minor ...


8

This is one of the most brilliant and fun to analyze songs from the American Songbook. One would think with the number of modulations there are in this song it would sound very technical but the melody combines with the harmony to make it a lyrical and harmonic masterpiece. Bar 24 C+7 is a dominant V7 of the Fm7 (VIm7) chord in bar 25. Bar 30 Dbm7 is a ...


5

Play the same progression in C major and you will see the chord in question is Ab = bVI. Transposing to C or a minor is what I always do if I don’t understand a degree or function. Like moonwave99 says: bVI in E♭ is C♭, not B.


4

Chord names relate to the root note of the chord, not the key. This makes sense and is helpful: it means a chord name always tells you exactly what intervals are in a chord; it means you can have chromatic chords within a key. So, for instance, a #11 is always an augmented 4th above a root (or some octave displacement of this), no matter what the key or ...


4

First - and most important - there is no requirement to choose all the chords of a piece (or section) of music from the same scale. But some people have a fixed idea that there SHOULD be. So they work out complicated systems of 'interchange' and 'borrowing' to justify 'outside' chords. They aren't in the home scale, but they're in some other scale. So ...


4

Yes, something interesting happens when you bring in the B or Cb chord. What happened? Or maybe you should ask what could happen after that. Many things could happen! To demonstrate the "borrowing" idea in practice: you can use the Db chord as a short step to another key, for example Eb minor or Gb major. How short or long it is and how serious you make the ...


4

No scale (I could find) contains those chords. Well, one scale that definitely contains those chords is the chromatic (12-tone) scale. You're free to use all those notes in whatever way you want! It's also likely that there's a way to see your progression in terms of diatonic scales too, if that's important to you. But to answer your question directly, If ...


3

First create fretboard diagrams for the chords in the first bar, and then drag the diagrams where you want them to be on your page. Then add labels for them, for example as chord symbols. Select a note or rest and press Cmd-K (maybe Ctrl-K on Windows), type the chord's name and drag it where you want. This is MuseScore 2.x. It might be different in 3.x.


3

It is not quite clear to me what you are trying to do but I think you are transcribing or changing the progression to a minor key from a major. So, in C major the I and ii chords are C maj and D min. As 7th chords they'd be C Maj7 and D min7. All you need to do to get the correct chords in sequence in a major or minor key is look at the triads created by ...


3

Literal transposition from major to minor doesn't work very well. You have discovered one of the reasons. You seem to think minor' just means 'natural minor'. There's the Harmonic and Melodic minor scales as well. Those non-flattened 6ths and 7ths are very useful options when attempting functional harmony.


3

This is not remotely a complete answer, but just a hint: There are many "flavours" of minor that you can mix and use in various combinations. For example, try this. (And do try it now, if possible, before you read further, so the first impact is not influenced by the theoretical aspect) Take your C minor scale, and see how it sounds over this progression: ...


3

The problem is that you cannot transpose from major to minor. You can observe the analogies and differences between parallel keys, but they are not supposed to work interchangeably. Playing a sequence of chords in a key or mode does not guarantee you a similar effect in any other key or mode, because you are playing completely different notes. Of course ...


3

I would just like to add something to Tim's answer. I do not think it's good to think of natural minor in the way you do ("I'm going to flatten the 3rd, 6th and 7th degree"). I was taught to think of minor keys in terms of their relative majors, not their parallel majors, and I think it's a lot better, especially when you start to get into modes (natural ...


3

The G#m7 sounds like Tommy Emmanuel just wanted spice it up with something a little bit "outside" and not so obviously V dominant, and G#m7 was readily available after the F#m7. In a more stereotypical, but perhaps boring and predictable form it would be G - C - F#m7 - B7 - Em7 - Am7 - D - G. If you want to get rid of the last remaining out-of-scale ...


3

Write the enharmonic equivalents of D# and A# (=Eb and Bb). Then you have the progression V-bVII-IV-I. Eb is a borrowed chord of f-minor. (As the other chords are are sus4 we even don’t know whether they’re major or minor. But if you are soloing in f-minor, it will be f- minor - or you have blue notes in mind ...). Is this o.k.? Every pthing is o.k. ...


2

Since the 7 diatonic modes are nothing more than the major scale starting on different degrees the chords are also the same, just shifted appropriately. Example: Major scale = {Maj, Min, Min, Maj, Maj, Min, Dim} Minor scale = {Min, Dim, Maj, Min, Min, Maj, Maj} Dorian starts on 2 Dorian scale = {Min, Min, Maj, Maj, Min, Dim, Maj} For the rest, {...


2

To me the chords look like: Gm7 - F6 - E♭6 and it could continue for example like this: B♭/D - Cm7 - B♭maj7 - Am7 - D7 Translated into three-note combinations like in your question: G - F - B♭ (Gm7) F - D - A (F6) E♭ - C - G (E♭6) D - B♭ - F (B♭/D) C - B♭ - E♭ (Cm7) B♭ - A - D (B♭maj7) A - G - C (...


2

...so it's almost C minor but with sixth degree raised half step @awelotta's answer already points out the collection of tones is the Dorian mode. But I think the more important thing that makes this almost minor - as in the key of C minor - is not the sixth degree but the seventh degree. The general minor family is first defined by a mediant (3rd degree) ...


2

It's always going to be a compromise going from major to minor. Mainly beause minor consists of one change in the lower 5 notes of the minor scale - the 3rd, going major to minor. The defining note. Still going up the scale(s) gives lots of options. In fact all the remaining notes chromatically! So you stating flatten the 6th and 7th doesn't have to be the ...


2

Basic answer - get so that you can play it properly! Simple fix - always play the 1st beat/chord of any bar at least. In 3/4, 1 is obviously the most emphasised, so a low G note from your example is important.The next Gm also comes on a beat (the third), so is more important than the preceding Dm, and should be played. The D7 at the end is a short note, but ...


2

These chords are all less than an octave. So you should be able to reach the notes. You’ll notice the hands are placed on the black keys and the white keys are played in between You need to do this. This requires more strength than stretch as you need to play further up the fulcrum of the white key. I would highly recommend a good teacher if you wish to play ...


2

There could be a thing as secondary subdominants, but we can also explain this particular progression a bit more simply: we talk about V–I resolutions creating a large descending circle-of-fifths progression. G–C–F–B♭, for instance, is one such descending circle of fifths. But here, we're going in the opposite direction: B♭–F–C–G! As such, this is ...


2

First one's correct! Never heard of 'broken'. Interrupted maybe? Not going to do the homework - even if it's not! Teach a guy to fish and all that! As simply as possible: cadences only involve the final two harmonies, whatever comes before doesn't count. Perfect - V>I or V>i in minor. Plagal - IV>I, or iv>i in minor. Interrupted - usually V>vi, but will ...


2

There are two parts to your question though that may not be obvious. First, "How does one compose in a minor key?" (even if only for a few bars). Second, "How does one re-write a given piece from a major to minor key?" The answer to the second requires answering the first. Melodies are not generally too much a problem. One can often tell by ear whether one ...


2

It's a sharp eleventh above the chord root. So with Fmaj9#11 you have a "sharp" eleventh. Notice the quotes. The sharp can be misleading, because it give the impression an actual sharp would be used to spell the chord. The default would be an 11 figure assumed to be a perfect eleventh. The # means raise it a half step. But, what if the root were Bb and a ...


2

I wouldn't try to explain it with anything fancy, the G major is the only small surprise there, bringing D Dorian taste, as opposed to, say, a Gm or Dm chord. If the chords were just Bb - F - C - Dm, I guess you wouldn't feel a need for any sort of analysis? I think the G major is the "money chord" there, bringing some recognizable character to the harmony. ...


2

Nice chords! I see them as: G - Cmaj7 - A6 - B6 - Em7 - Cmaj7 - D/F# - G The A6 takes it towards G lydian, then the B6 briefly takes it further out into lydian augmented space - before returning to "normal" from Em7.


2

Since the focus of the question seems to be about the G#m7 chord, I would point out that it forms a chromatic mediant relation to the Em7 chord that follows after. Roots G# and E are a third apart and the chord qualities are the same. I think that is better description than calling G#m7 an inverted B6. If the B6 is presumably the dominant of Em then the G# ...


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