Hot answers tagged

16

In general, when you only have a limited amount of voices and you need to leave out a note in a chord, the Perfect 5th is the first to go. A Perfect 5th doesn't typically add a lot of color to a chord and thus typically when playing a chord it's viewed as OK to omit without changing the nature of a chord. I will say for this specific chord, there's no reason ...


12

How can I do this the right way The right way is to take context into account, and the note reduction decisions are usually somewhat artistic choices. Your program has to be able to look at the song and understand what the essential point is. What does the picture represent? Context means things like: What key is it in? How does each chord turn the ...


12

If one is in a major key, then III is a major chord build on scale step 3. An example is in C major, the III is an E major chord, E-G♯-B (in some order.) The symbol ♭III in C major is an E♭ major chord, E♭-G-B♭ (in some order.) If in a minor key, then the III chord is built on a flattened third so in C minor, III is E♭-G-B♭ (in some order). The term ♭III ...


10

About the "tonic" Not every scale has a tonic chord. Tonic is primarily a concept in major/minor Tonality and does not apply (the same way) in modality or to non major/minor-Tonal music. When other kinds of musical structures are involved (the Locrian mode, for example), one more generally speaks of a pitch center, which is a more general term that ...


9

I recommend trying to clearly show the functional role of each chord with your labels. So for this example, you have two options: VII7–III V7/III–III The first option is not wrong, but it doesn't clearly show what the relationship between the VII chord and the III chord actually is. The V7/III label, however, makes this very clear: here is a dominant of a ...


9

It is common to omit a note from a chord, especially on a guitar, where 3-4 note voicings commonly sound the best, and also it's not always convenient to play all notes. In many cases perfect fifth is a note that doesn't add much to the chord and it can be omitted as in this case. So yes, this is a perfectly valid voicing of E7 chord.


8

It is common to omit the 5th in a seventh chord. In the case of E7, that means leaving out the B. E is the root G♯ is the third B is the fifth D is the seventh Omitting the fifth is also commonly done in minor seventh and major seventh chords.


7

The chords in The Real Book (or any fake book) only tell you the general outline of the harmony. Playing them as given will not include the melody (except by occasional coincidence). To realize the music means to arrange the notes of the chords and melody so that they can be played together. The chord voicings you choose -- that is, the specific way you play ...


6

I believe it varies between different people's/textbooks' conventions, but as I understand it, the Roman numeral itself indicates the degree of the scale, and the capitalization indicates major or minor. Any preceding accidental changes the root note from that degree of the scale (but the quality still stays the same, so this changes all the notes). This is ...


6

What do you mean by the tonic chord feels as 'home'? If it doesn't feel like home, you shouldn't call it a tonic. If it doesn't feel like a center, don't give it the number 1. If you TRIED to make it sound like home, but it did not sound like home, then you FAILED. As simple as that. Maybe you tried to do something that's nearly impossible to begin with, ...


5

Triads (i.e., three notes comprising "modern-day triads") existed before the 16th century, but they were not understood as "triads". The use of triads becomes more prominent around that time, however, and the theory of triads is believed to have arisen about a century later. Three notes sounding harmoniously together goes back well ...


5

There is no open B string. He is fretting it with the third finger, so it sounds an "E". Like this: Image Source


4

This passage is unnecessarily complex in my opinion but he is talking about the non-diatonic major 6th of F minor, not the diatonic minor 6th of F# minor. The m7b5 chord can actually be considered a 3rd inversion of a m6 chord, case in point: Fm6 is F Ab C D Fm6 3rd inversion is D F Ab C Dm7b5 is D F Ab C, identical to Fm6/D The chord in your diagram is this ...


4

what other stuff should I know? You need a general knowledge of harmony. In particular: What notes are in chords What upper structures can you add to a given chord in given context (this is closely related to scales) Which notes of the chords are the most important for their harmonic function (on guitar chords played with 3–4 notes often sound the best, so ...


4

Inversions are determined by the bass note of the chord. The chord third in the bass is a first inversion, chord fifth, second inversion, chord seventh third inversion, etc. Sometimes the top harmony note will be mentioned but that harmonically doesn't make much difference. (It may make a big difference in playing though and in the sound.) Inversions are ...


4

My question is, how can this section be best analysed with Roman numerals? (I would imagine something like "V/?" "I/?" would be better than simply writing "bVII" "III".) I wouldn't choose bVII-III, but V/I B (D!) or V7/iii ... both are adequate. Like most minor pieces this passage in B-minor includes the relative ...


4

You're correct about the Locrian mode. It's rarely used, because 'home' is supposed to be a diminished harmony. Which in itself is unstable. So it's somewhat of an oxymoron. In Western music, it's well established that simple major or minor harmonies (chords) are way more stable than any other. Could that be why the vast majority of pieces are deemed to be ...


3

Who first introduced the triad into music? It is not possible to pinpoint a moment when the triad was introduced, much less an individual responsible for it. But Bertoglio isn't talking about the introduction of the triad into music. She's talking about its introduction into music theory. That's why she used the phrase "concept of 'triad chord.'"...


3

In any chord, certain notes have certain importance. The root is important as it gives the name to the chord. In this case, E7. The third is important as without it, the chord will be neither major nor minor. An important factor in harmony. This one contains G♯, making it a major based chord. Since it's a 7th chord, it needs that 7th part. Here a D note. ...


3

Any chord remains the same chord regardless the order or position of its notes. So A-C-E is always A minor -- and thus the iv chord in this context -- no matter what pitch is on the bottom, middle, or top. As long as the only pitches involved are A-C-E, it's A minor. The inversion of the chord is determined by the lowest pitch. In the case of A minor, A ...


3

I think the answer depends on both a) whether you mean a dominant triad, a dominant seventh, or both; and b) the style of the music in question. If you mean a dominant triad only, then you're correct: by calling it a dominant, you are implying that this must be V, and therefore you're implying what tonic (I or i) must be. But as Bennyboy mentions, the ...


3

In the first measure the notes (vertically are): C-C-F-A-C then B-B-F-G-C, resolving to C-C-E-G-C. This middle "passing" chord looks like G7add11/B. Coexistence of major third (B) and perfect fourth (C) is something to be used with much care. A simple solution would be to raise the soprano melody to D on the last beat of the first measure. ...


3

The first chord (ex. 3.12, m.4) is spelled C Ab Eb--not sure how that is a chord based on scale degree 5 (Bb); The next chord (ex. 3.12, m.4)is spelled Db A F. The first chord is inverted. It is an A♭ major chord in first inversion. The second chord is actually D♭ A♭ F, because the flat on the A from the first chord still applies until the end of the ...


3

The bIII is your tip-off that this is a "borrowed chord". "When we’re in a major key, we can “borrow” chords such as iio, bIII, iv, bVI and viio7 from the parallel minor key, which means the minor key of the same name. Of these chords, iv is the most common. Borrowed chords in minor keys are less common, but we can sometimes borrow the I and ...


3

The Wikipedia user who posted that image has done so based on no references or practical experience, as revealed by reading the chat for that page. The convention is that the harmonic minor scale is assumed, so in the key of C minor, i=Cm, iio=Do (D diminished), III=Eb, iv=Fm, V=G, VI=Ab, viio=Bo (B diminished). There's no need to write III as bIII and no ...


3

Your Tonic chord is simply the core triad, either major or minor that a piece of music is based on. It has nothing to do with "white keys, or black keys" (Sharps or flats). It it the resolution of a perfect 5th in which the third tone of the fifth is the 7th of the base tonic. A simple example: the take a song in the key of C major. That is ...


3

Your understanding of the tonic chord seems just fine. Your real question is about locrian mode an whether a diminished chord can be a tonic. I think you should make a distinction between what are musical conventions and some notion of absolute, objective musical qualities. There is a very long traditional and some acoustical support of the sense of ...


2

This site https://bartoszmilewski.com/2020/05/25/guitar-decomposed-3-moving-sideways/ does a great job of exploring the relationships between the CAGED shapes. The author is a noted programmer and mathematician who is applying some of those skills to guitar. In terms of a system to analyse the voicings, if looking from the bass I tend to think about the ...


2

Basically, you are hinting at a A7sus4 chord, but the method you describe to get there is the issue. I think this description... ...add a 9th to a subdominant IV chord... and this one ...in D major...adding an A to the G chord and losing the 3rd...You would have the notes G A and D. ...are presenting some contradictory ideas that are part of the ...


2

I think you want to distinguish progressions that exemplify tendency tone movements from other kinds of harmonic movement and also whether the tones are real chord tones rather than embellishing tones. Tendency tones like the following are mostly about tonic/dominant progressions... ...^7 the leading tone moves up to the tonic, because the progression is I ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible