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14

Only a guess, as there's not a lot to go on. It could be that you're trying to play with your fingers, as opposed to your hand. Yes, that sounds daft, but beginners sometimes think that a chord is like an extension of single notes together. Which it obviously is, but it won't be played as such. Away from the piano, move your fingers from the knuckle joint. ...


13

Summary The following general principles/techniques for handling large chords are given below: Flatten the hand Shift the hand away from the body, toward the fall board Play multiple notes with one finger Redistribute notes across both hands Play one or more notes as ornaments (i.e., grace notes) Roll the chord Leave out one or more notes Re-voice the chord ...


12

This is usually referred to as an open or spread voicing, it is a general term to indicate the voicing of the chord spans beyond regular stacking, or close voicing. You are right that it isn’t an inversion. The guitar lends itself to many different ways to voice the same chord. Depending on the chord sometimes the guitar will give you options for open ...


8

The book shows the major chord followed by the corresponding augmented chord, both in the same measure. Because they're in the same measure, the accidental associated with the major chord carries over to the augmented chord as well. So, for example: X: 1 T: Augmented chord K: none M: none "A"[A^ce]4 "A aug"[Ac^e]4| Here is an image (in ...


6

It's called "tritone substitution". The notes of Ab7 are Ab, C, Eb, Gb (or F#). This chord has two notes that are also present in the secondary dominant of G, ie D7 - C and F# - and Ab and D form a tritone (as do C and F#). Basically one can often replace a secondary dominant by the chord formed on its tritone.


6

It is known as tritone substitution. It works because two notes out of the four are the same as two notes from the actual dominant of the next chord played. Let's look at the notes: G (the target chord) has D7 as its dominant. D7 contains D F♯ A and C. Its tritone sub. which is A♭7 contains A♭ C E♭ and G♭. It's always the 3rd and 7th that become 7th and 3rd. ...


5

The concept of modal interchange (or "modal borrowing" or "mode mixture") is that you "borrow" a chord quality that is diatonic in the parallel key. If you're in, say, C major, you can borrow chords that are diatonic to C minor (and vice versa). So to find opportunities to borrow diminished triads, let's first find where those ...


5

Trying to encapsulate an answer that's concise and short! Triads are basically 'stacked thirds'. That is, notes 1,3,5, and 2,4,6, and 3,5,7 etc.It is a fact that each root is from a diatonic note in that key. Thus 1,3,5 in key C is CEG; 2,4,6 is DFA, 3,5,7 is EGB etc.Some of those 'thirds' intervals are major (M), others minor (m). One has both intervals ...


5

The Ab7 chord is considered an Ab augmented sixth chord, spelled [Ab C Eb F#]. The "standard" resolution of that chord would be to [G C E G] followed by G major, but it's acceptable in modern music (i.e., 20th century and later) to just go directly to G major. The key concept behind augmented sixth chords is that the augmented sixth ([Ab-F#] in ...


5

You have already hit on part of the solution: the solution would be perhaps to rewrite the chord by placing some notes in a different octave to make some space, which doesn't always give me the result I want. When spreading out the triad, it might not give you the result you want at first, but there are many ways to voice a spread triad, so you might have ...


5

For me there is confusion in your using the word "best": There are no strict rules in music. What I usually do, as an amateur pianist/composer, is to select the notes which have the most distinctive color (can be the 13th you name it), choose a pair of other notes from the chord that either push toward the classic triad, or on the contrary on the ...


4

Single notes at a fixed interval don't sound good. I'm afraid you're mistaken in thinking that triads will sound any better. What you may be looking for is harmony in thirds. Unfortunately they will need to be diatonic thirds (i.e. not consistently major or minor thirds) and they'll need to be sometimes below, sometimes above the melody note. And ...


4

For the purposes of this question, chords are most usefully defined as every other note from the root of the chord, with chords having their roots on each note of the corresponding scale. Triads (3-note chords) Given a major or minor scale, the chords, given by the scale degrees comprising each chord are scale degrees major scale example (C) chord quality ...


4

Let's look at diatonic notes starting from C. The white keys of the piano. These are the notes of the C major scale, and a similar geometry of intervals exists in all keys, it just starts from a different note and the white/black key distribution isn't so simple when you start elsewhere. The piano keyboard has been deliberately designed so that it is easy to ...


4

One possible exercise is to practice playing the triads corresponding to a scale as you would a scale. So for A major, instead of playing A – B – C# – D – E – F# – G# – A, you can play the chords: A - Bm - C#m - D - E - F#m - G#dim For minor scales you might want to invent a few variations of the exercise to cater for the flexibility in minor keys.


4

I had to hunt down the definition, but I found some sources. Secco means dry in Italian. In music the "dry" meaning of secco is without ornamentation. Non-arpeggio in plain English. Indicated by a bracket before chords similar to the wavy line for arpeggios, but with the opposite meaning. I found definitions with general, recitative, and harp ...


4

Would 'power chords' with different intervals (like thirds) in just intonation create the same effect without sounding as messy? Yes. Crank up the gain and try playing e.g. G#4 on the 9th fret of the 2nd string and B4 on the 7th fret of the 1st string. You need to tune the 2nd string a bit lower, to bring it to just intonation. If you do it simultaneously (...


3

I'm afraid your teacher is right. This is a problem common to all keyboard instruments and others as well (harp, guitar). It simply requires lots of practice and careful listening.


3

There is no right way! There may be a right way for you, or me, but there is no universal right way! Several reasons why one may be better can be found. Using M A P will suit people whose fingers are fatter. Those three take up the least space. Using M I A moves the I out of the way - as Justin says. It also facilitates moving directly to Amaj7, which can ...


3

The minor scale is just the major scale displaced by a 6th. It becomes clearer if we label the elements of the major scale below and then list the associated components of the minor scale. Major scale = 1-Maj, 2-Min, 3-Min, 4-Maj, 5-Maj, 6-Min, 7-Dim Minor scale = 6-Min, 7-Dim, 1-Maj, 2-Min, 3-Min, 4-Maj, 5-Maj


3

How about: “chords that won’t make you a rich guitar player”??? All joking aside, I would and do call these jazz chords. I know they are not exclusive to jazz but then again cowboy chords are not exclusive to country music. The fact is jazz (in its all encompassing form, swing, big band, Dixieland, bop, etc.) is where these types of chords are used the most ...


3

I think the two fingerings I use the most often are (D-G-B string order): 2-3-4 1-1-2, i.e. with short barree. If I try to use three large fingers (1, 2 and 3), one of them ends up farther away from the fret which causes risk of fret buzz.


3

Unfortunately it's not as straightforward as that... :) The question of whether a particular backing note sounds neutral varies case by case, depending on a variety of things such as whether the overall piece is in a major or minor key, what other harmonies are present before, during and after the backing note, and so forth. And we don't know your song... ...


3

Block chord is a term sometimes used in that sense, as opposed to arpeggio, or even "broken chord". For reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Block_chord


3

A couple of things you should be aware of, first the Fsus4 shouldn’t be labeled as major since Fsus4 has no 3rd. Also, major chords don’t need to be labeled as maj, C and G is all you need. I agree with Lawrence that this can’t be labeled as any key in particular, to me it mostly wanders around different tonalities every 2 bars, which is totally fine. My ...


3

The general terms for whether two things -- notes or chords -- sound good together are "consonance" (good) and "dissonance" (bad). Since at root this is a question of aesthetics, there's no rule. If you want to follow 19th century musical aesthetics, then any note (let alone chord) you add to one of those basic triads is dissonant, and ...


3

Five stars for Aaron's answer. Personally I am not a slave to notation and if something doesn't fit my hand, I don't force it. An injury can put you out of commission for a long time. My teacher couldn't reach tenths but used to do stretching exercises to reach them and she blew out a tendon on her thumb. It took two years to heal. My general rule of ...


2

Are there any Neutral sounding harmonies? No. By the very definition of harmony they cannot be neutral. Harmonies occur when two or more sounds have frequencies with mathematical relationships which mean that reinforcement happens.


2

All the answers offer good information but I like the one by wabisabied because it offers some logic behind the answer (even though I'd disagree with the actual statement it supports). The fact is that every possible way to finger the chord serves a purpose. In choosing a fingering you need to satisfy a couple requirements: (1) does the fingering produce a ...


2

"There is no one correct way." But... I like to fret open A with 213 because it prepares me for a quick transition to D without moving the index finger, and to E with just moving it back one fret. This is useful for playing in D and A. My second favorite is to barre those notes with my index finger, leaving me open fingers to play boogie-woogie ...


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