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14

This is where your musicianship skills become useful. (Or where you realise you need some!) Write down the melody and show it to us as notation. Then we know what we're talking about. Hint: You'll probably find it much easier to notate with an E♭ minor key signature. I'm really not trying to belittle you. But if you want to work with music, LEARN THE ...


11

First of all you should learn to identify what the bass is playing. This is not the pure chord progression but you can guess what it could be. If you sing the triad built on the root and it fits to the harmony, the bass plays the root and the assumption is correct. If not, the bass plays an inversion and there are a few possibilities. If you analyze songs ...


9

It is not because the fundamental is the loudest. In fact the fundamental does not even need to be there! There is a function of the brain called fundamental tracking. We have evolved to be sensitive to the harmonic sequence, f_n = n*f_1, even though not all vibrating systems follow this sequence. Given an input of several frequencies the ear responds to ...


8

Remember that there are two further triad qualities other than major and minor: diminished and augmented. The triads are named after their qualities of fifths, so a diminished triad has a root and diminished fifth, and an augmented triad has a root and augmented fifth. Filling in the gaps, we can also understand diminished triads as a stack of two minor ...


8

The notation used in this example is explained in the same textbook http://openmusictheory.com/harmonicFunctions.html and http://openmusictheory.com/harmonicSyntax2.html In this example T(1 D2p 3): T stands for tonic chord parentheses mean the whole sequence is what they call a prolongation of the tonic chord T1 stands for tonic built on 1st degree of the ...


8

...or take a C7 chord and add a diminished ninth to it... A diminished ninth is actually enharmonically equal to an octave. So adding a diminished ninth actually just results in the same chord C7. Obviously they mean add a minor ninth to a dominant seventh chord. You can call that a dominant seventh, flat nine chord and it gets the symbol 7♭9. The word &...


7

The quality of the chords given by upper/lower case hints at the mode, major or minor. I ii iii a major chord on the first scale degree, and two minor chords and the second and third degrees fits the pattern of major keys. i iio III minor, diminished, major chord qualities on the first three scale degrees matches the pattern for minor. But some combinations ...


7

Your confusion is understandable; there is certainly a gray area between tone clusters and extended chords where a group of notes could be viewed as both. Since you've been looking for definitions already, I'll try to supply one of my own. To me, a tone cluster is a collection of three or more pitches that includes at least two consecutive half-step ...


6

Simplistically speaking (and ignoring lots of important detail about intonation and temperament), the major third has a frequency ratio of 5:4 compared to the root, and the perfect fifth 3:2. Let's imagine that we have a root at frequency 100 Hz, and pick out the first few partials of each note of a major chord. Root: 100 Hz, 200 Hz, 300 Hz, 400 Hz, 500 Hz, ...


6

I don't think there is one specific term to apply, but there are several to consider. The terms are about inversion (which chord tone is in the bass) and the voicing (the space between chord tones.) But your question complicates the matter, because of the way the two hands overlap in the top image. As notated the top image is... ...where I notated the "...


6

What sort of music are you listening to? Anything other than guitar-based popular music may not be based on a chord progression at all. And a lot of current 'songs' are based on chords, but not 'progressions' as we've learnt them. (As witness the number of questions here asking 'how does this work?' and the convoluted attempts to find some logical reason ...


5

The rules are thus: Can you play it? Like, physically, can your fingers reach the notes and can they do so consistently in the context of a song as chords are changing? This sounds obvious but it's important because sometimes "closed" voicings can be tough on a guitar fretboard especially when you get into seventh chords. This rule invalidates ...


5

The note D is not part of a Gdim chord. You should play the notes G-Bb-Db. One way to do this would be this slightly modified version of your suggestion (from low E to high e): 3-X-X-3-2-3 Depending on the type of guitar you have, you could fret the low G (third fret low E string) either with your thumb or with your second finger. Since Gdim is a triad, you ...


5

Written as F#9 it is most likely an f sharp chord with a ninth. An F chord with a sharp nine is always a dominant chord and would be written as F7#9.


4

Alban Berg and Elliot Carter are among some to use chords with all twelve tones in them. This wikipedia list documents some chords and what pieces they have been used in https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/All-interval_twelve-tone_row


4

Here is one trick if you just want to lay down a series of chords under your melody. Work out what key you are playing in, then write out all the triads (1st, 3rd, 5th) in that key. There should be seven of them, with one starting on each note of the scale. Pick a group of notes to lay a chord under. This could be a bar, but doesn't have to be. Pick two ...


4

Guess they refer to: Tonic (root) Subdominant (4th degree) Dominant (5th degree)


4

A big majority of pop-type songs use diatonic chords mainly. Those are chords made up from the notes in their scale. Knowing the 'chord families' will be of great help. There are 3 major and 3 minor chords in each family. I, IV and V being major, and ii, iii and vi being minor. So, in, say, key C, the majors are C, F and G, the minors Dm, Em and Am. Were it ...


4

That's not a Gdim, because it's missing a Bb and there's no D in Gdim. I wouldn't call that a simplistic Gdim or any kind of Gdim at all. A diminished G chord has a minor third (Bb note) and a diminished fifth (Db). Yours doesn't have a third at all, and it has a perfect fifth as well as a diminished fifth or sharp 11th, so it doesn't do the job of a dim ...


4

You're both correct, but the person in the video should have been more clear. He should have said that the B diminished seventh chord is the leading-tone chord of the ensuing C-minor chord. Because it's viio7 of C minor, that Bo7 functions to briefly make C minor sound like tonic even though the piece as a whole is in B-flat.


3

A lot of things are going on in the song! The verse is in A minor, it starts with a simple Am/E vamp. Then it plays Dm/ Bb/D / C / G. The only "strange" chord is Bb/D, Bb in first inversion that is. It is the bII chord of the A minor scale and is called the neapolitan chord. It creates a very beautiful sound, because it encloses the A note between ...


3

The vii(dim 7) will have a more dissonant sound that the v, also there will be four different pitches in the seventh chord than in the basic triad. Finally, vii(dim 7) has no tones in common with i, whereas v has one pitch in common with i. So three things you could listen for: relative level of dissonance four distinct pitches vs. three common tone with ...


3

First, note that all overtones are not all octave apart: considering a frequency f, the first overtone (or second harmonic) will have a frequency of 2f, corresponding with an octave, the second overtone will have a frequency of 3f, corresponding to an octave plus a perfect fifth, and so on… About your question, as it is illustrated by the mechanism of "...


3

Answering what I think you're asking: the point of using RN is that it applies to any key. So in key C major, C=I, G=V. In key E major, E=I, B=V. And so on. That's the point. Changing from a major key to a minor key, and expecting to use the same RN, it won't work.In key C major, I=C, and in C minor, i=Cm. After that, there are no real likenesses - with the ...


3

Yes. In Roman Numeral notation, the Roman Numeral used corresponds to the note number counted from the tonic. Individual notes are usually given with Arabic numerals (usually with a caret on top, but I don't know how to generate these easily.) So in the key of C Major, the notes (in order) C-D-E-F-G-A-B or 1-2-3-4-5-6-7; in Eb Major the numbers 1-2-3-4-5-6-7 ...


3

T, S and D represent Tonic, Subdominant and Dominant respectively. I = tonic, IV = subdominant, and V = dominant. As in key C, T=I=C. S=IV=F. D=V=G. The numbers show what the lowest note is - often called its 'inversion'. 1 is root, with the root note (the letter name of the chord) at the bottom. 2 moves everything up, so the third of the chord is at the ...


3

It really doesn't work like that. You can change the key by a number of semitones, and sing the same intervals successively, but that's not what you are asking. You seem to be asking about harmony. Which isn't another voice so many semitones away, singing parallel. The intervals change constantly. Do that and you will sound out of tune with people singing in ...


3

The suggestions to first transcribe the bass line and the melody are spot on. This will often give you the framework of the chord progression, which, along with your knowledge of music theory, will help you work out what chords you're hearing. However, alongside this, you should also learn to hear individual chords in each of their inversions. Here is one ...


3

You are right that the leading tone diminished chord of Bb is A diminished but in this case he is talking about using the leading tone diminished chord of the Cm chord which is B diminished.


3

Tone clusters are chords depending how you define chords. A tone cluster is just a chord made up of mostly seconds. Whether a chord is a tone cluster, a chord by seconds (a chord made by stacking major or minor seconds), or an inverted ninth chord is all dependent on context and can arguably be more than one of those depending what’s going on around it. Tone ...


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