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15

Never. C° is always C diminished. C major seventh can be signed with a triangle after the C. Bear in mind that half-diminished is signified by a circle with a diagonal line through it. Cmaj7 is C E G B. C°7 is C E♭ G♭ B♭♭. C half dim. is C E♭ G♭ B♭. Note: they all contain C E G B something.


14

The bass is the critical part. D means play a D major chord ...and by default the bass should be D the chord's root. D/F# is a so-called slash chord (or an inverted chord is standard music theory) which means play a D major chord ...but play F# - the chord's third - in the bass. NOTE: When the third of a major chord is in the bass, there is a strong ...


13

Yes, seventh chords are made up using 4 notes. 1,3,5 and 7. That's why they are named 'seventh' chords. But that's going to be too simple! There are quite a few different 7th chords, and the one you're asking about is the dominant seventh.It's actually a chord that belongs to key F, rather than key C. The B♭ note that's added to the basic triad doesn't ...


13

You cannot omit an altered fifth. In other words, you cannot omit the b5 from either a half-diminished chord or a diminished chord, or the #5 from an augmented chord. The omission of the 5th only works for unaltered fifths that are implied by the harmonic overtones of the root.


12

You're still holding the C root at the bottom, so calling it a C chord of some sort is justified. You eventually also hold E (not F), B flat, D, and A at the fermata signs, so calling it a C13 chord (which should contain C, E, B flat, and A at the very least) is also justified. The C13 chord symbol looks fine.


12

A commonly used way to play those chords is: D : play the three-note chord D, F#, A with your right hand, and D with your left hand an octave or two lower. D/F# : play the same three-note chord D, F#, A with your right hand, but F# with your left hand. When your left hand plays low bass notes, the ”inversions” marked using slash chords are right, no matter ...


8

...Are 7th chords made up from 4 notes? The simple answer is yes. C E G Bb is a dominant seventh chord and it has 4 tones. In practice it is common to not play all chord tones - you can call those implied or incomplete chords - and sometimes the root of a chord is not actually play - implied or rootless chords. A little more sophisticated answer is that ...


8

A dominate 7th chord (often written as x7 where x is the root) will contain the Root (1st degree), 3rd, 5th, and flat 7th. Therefor a C7 will be C, E, G and Bb. At times a player can choose to leave out a note, usually the 5th or the root but in those case it is common that the other players will be playing them or that they are implied. The 3rd and 7th ...


6

Work out the chord shape? That's not always possible from piano music to guitar. Work out the chords themselves is easier. First is to establish what key the piece is likely to be in. Here, with 5 flats, it's either D♭ major or its relative B♭ minor. You can read the dots, so in the first bar, there's predominantly B♭ F and D♭ notes. ...


6

Since you can read the notes, you can quickly work out that the first bar is Bbm. Half was through the next bar might just be Ab or potentially Absus4. Then the next bar Gb7. You have to analyse each bar or half bar. There will be passing notes and extra notes that don't need to be included in the guitar chords. You have to decide what sounds right to ...


6

I have never ever seen "o" denoting a major 7 chord. A triangle can be used for maj7 in some books (e.g. the Aebersold play alongs), and 'o' is always diminished. You may also encounter a slashed cirle (ø) for half diminished (min7 b5) chords.


6

It's much easier to play it as a barre chord: use your index finger on all strings on the 2nd fret, and another fingertip for the 4th fret. Wiki has a page on this subject here


5

o a degree sign for diminished triad or o7 for diminished seventh chords. ø7 for half-diminished seventh chords. Δ7 a delta or triangle for major seventh chords. Other signs are used capital M for major or lower case m for minor, etc. You may have been mistaking the delta for a diminished sign.


5

If you're playing from sheet music that's been handwritten, or perhaps photocopied multiple times, it's not uncommon for the small △ symbol, which denotes Maj7 to end up looking like small circle °, which, as you say, denotes Diminished. Or if the copyist isn't particularly careful, the circle and triangle can end up looking similar.


5

Everyone knows what you mean, but really the fifth is the third harmonic. It IS the second overtone though. That fifth harmonic, the major third one, probably does contribute to the instability of a minor chord, and this is no doubt why minor chords weren't seen as completely consonant until hmmm... the end of the C17th, and not everyone agreed even then. ...


5

...It's said that the P5 can go first due to it still being audible as a harmonic of the root Invert the chord with fifth omitted (E C of a C major chord). The overtone from the bass should be a B, a major seventh relative to the root. This provides no explanation about why the fifth is omittable (although it does provide some explanation of the instability ...


4

Chord symbols are absolute. The set of pitches defined by a chord symbol is not relative to any context like key or scale. If you have an Em9 chord, it means the notes E, G, B, D and F#, and to play it you don't have to look at a key signature or anything. If you're playing an Em9 chord, then you can't be "using" E phrygian, that's a contradiction. It's ...


4

If you want to use a scale, use Mixolydian. But I prefer referencing a chord, a dominant thirteenth chord (from a major scale.) The jazz chord name system doesn't reference any key or scale (the chords are never in major or Mixolydian, or whatever) so I think it's more logical to reference a default chord rather than scale. So the reference chord, the ...


4

The chord you are describing is referred to as a dominant seventh, which flattens the seventh note of the scale. By doing this the chord becomes very useful for resolving back to the tonic of the scale because of the tension caused by the flatted seventh scale degree when it is combined with the other harmonies in the chord. Compare that to the major seventh ...


4

When playing three or four string stops, don't try to play all the strings at once. For a triple stop, you start double on the lower two notes and rotate to the upper two notes during the bow stroke, roughly splitting the duration of the note in half for each double. On a four note stop you play the bottom two strings, then transition to the top two. ...


4

The names Italian, French and German have a sure and certain origin. They were coined by John Wall Callcott in his "A musical grammar", oublished in 1806. Or, better, he quotes the first (italian) from tradition, and coins himself the other two. Very simple!!


4

I wrap my left thumb around the neck, so that is how I would play it. Most people will reject the whole concept. But consider - I don't have to play the six note barred F chord!


4

Quite often the most important note of a "m7-5" chord is the "-5", and leaving that out spoils its harmonic effect more than leaving out some other note. If you have to leave something out, ditch the seventh or maybe even the third. This is one reason why it's better to look at "Bm7-5" as Dm6/B. In the contexts where it's commonly used, there are two ...


4

When we talk about chords, we're typically talking in a tonal context with certain assumptions. One of assumptions is what intervals affect the overall harmony. If we focus on simple chords for now triads and 7ths, the major flavors of the chord tend to come from the 3rd and the 7th. It's viewed from this perspective that the 5th dose not bring out the ...


3

The left hand part is just power chords (= root + fifth) so you can probably get away with just playing the root note (since the fifth is implied by being present in the overtones). If you want to play full triads, then look to the key signature and the melody to find whether it's a major or minor chord.


3

"I saw in some website, that it's made up from "B♭". Let's get that out of the way for a start! Yes, a B♭ does come into it, but that statement, as it stands, is nonsense. Carry on... Yes, a major chord has three notes. If we consider the lowest note to be the root of a major scale (yes, if you want to understand theory you'll need to know ...


3

The "m" only modifies the third of the chord and it does absolutely nothing to any other note of the chord. Chord symbols are used to describe chords, not scales. In Cm, "m" makes the third an Eb instead of E. When counting the steps, major scale based on the root note is assumed, except that "7" means minor seventh by default, and "maj7" is a major seventh. ...


3

The P5 from the root of a major or minor chord can be omitted because that sound is already heard in a harmonic from the root note, albeit more quietly than if it was played as a saparate note. The diminished chord has 1, ♭3 and diminished 5. That dim.5 is not contained in the harmonics of ,well, either note from that chord. So leaving it out means ...


3

I really don't know the answer and this is largely speculation, but it won't fit in a comment. What are chords? What are triads? IMO, they are commonly known and used building blocks for shaping harmony quickly and effectively. An abstraction like Michael Curtis says in a comment. But you can define and shape harmony even with sequences of single notes. Who ...


3

One way to look into this is to consider the actual harmonic frequencies that would be present. If we have a note at 100Hz, and assume it has perfectly harmonic overtones, then it will have harmonics at: 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900.... Hz. The (justly-intoned) perfect fifth up would be at 150Hz. So it would have harmonics at 150, 300, 450,...


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