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14

With a Tritone for the left hand and a major triad for the right… an experienced jazz pianist would immediately recognize this as a rootless upper structure voicing. So without any context, the options are either Db7#9 or G13b9. The next chord (a rootless fourth voicing) helps to narrow it down to G13b9.


9

This technique has a few different names, a pyramid, bell, or cascade chord. It can be considered a classification of arpeggio since sometimes when arpeggios are played the notes are sustained. Here is an excerpt from the “Arpeggio” article in Wikipedia: A bell chord, also known colloquially as "bells", is a musical arrangement technique in which ...


9

But by looking at the chord in isolation (without the context of the following C major chord), can we tell that this is a G7b9? We can't. Without context I could call it E7b9 (although 9 in bass is rather unusual). So is it then not G7b9? This seems to be a demonstration (or transcription, it's from Levine's book, isn't it?) of how an instrument (piano in ...


8

The most basic chords are triads, which have a root note, another note a 3rd above, and another, a 3rd above that. O.k. that last note is really a 5th above the root, but by considering it the former way, we have the start of a stack of 3rds. Those 3rds are usually M3 or m3, so that gives us CEG - M3+m3, or CE♭G - m3+M3, the basic major and minor triads, ...


6

This is Nashville chord notation system https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nashville_Number_System The numbers refer to the scale steps on which the chords are built. The song is in the key of Db major. 1 means chord built on the first step, Db major. 1/3 means Db chord with 3rd scale degree in bass, F. 3m is a minor chord built on the 3rd scale degree, F minor. ...


6

'Stack of thirds' (or 'pile of thirds') is a way of looking at triad-based harmony that analyses every note of a chord as a root plus some kind of 3rd (major or minor), some kind of 5th (perfect, diminished or augmented) etc. continuing with a 7th, 9th, 11th and 13th. It has its uses. It doesn't cover the decorative use of an added 2nd, 6th or 9th. It ...


6

The primary job of a jazz pianist is not to write chord symbols for groups of notes. The primary job of a jazz pianist is to look at already written chord symbols (or even better, know the changes without staring at a music sheet) and make an artistic contribution by coming up with notes. So if the book is about jazz piano, written for aspiring ...


5

The "stack of thirds" is literally that - a stack of notes where each adjacent note in the stack is a 3rd away from its neighbour(s). Not only does this make full versions of extended chords (7th chords, 9th chords, 11th chords, and 13th chords) easier to envision, but this also emphasizes that Western music primarily uses tertian harmony. Tertian ...


5

When talking about chords and chord symbols, the term "stack of thirds" is specifically not about voicing - it's the theoretical model behind traditional Western chordal harmony that's used for reasoning about other properties of chords, excluding voicing. The practice of traditional Western music separates a chord's functional properties from its ...


4

"Music Theory" — or more specifically, "Common Practice" or "Tonal" Theory — isn't designed with popular music in mind, and popular music frequently isn't constructed with music theory in mind. View #1: Voice leading In the case of this particular chord progression, I find it productive to consider it in terms of voice leading. ...


4

If you're doing simple strumming, a root position chord generally sounds best. So this may be the voicing first offered to a beginner. That's all.


4

As you say, C, E, and G make a C major chord. But those notes can be played in any order, and they can appear multiple times, and still be considered a C major chord. E G C is a C major chord; C C G E E G is a C major chord; .... As long as there aren't any notes other than C, E, and G, it's C major. This is true on all instruments, not just guitar. And it's ...


4

The C chord comprises C E and G . That's all. So any strings that make any of those notes will be up for grabs. As you rightly say, some strings need fretting to make those notes, BUT others are already producing those notes while they're open. So why wouldn't they be left open to play as we strum that C chord? OP mentions only 5 strings! A lot of guitar ...


4

An arpeggio is a chord played with the notes in ascending or descending order. A broken chord is a chord played such that not all pitches are sounded at the same time. In this case, it's both an arpeggio and a broken chord — both terms are appropriate to describe the music — but it also happens that each note is sung by a different voice. The multiple voices ...


3

Probably because it came from a jazz resource where authors notoriously combine chord names or Roman numeral analysis with enharmonic misspellings. Second you may not know about rootless chord voicings in jazz. Typically, rootless chord voicings involve the chord root played by some bass instrument, like the piano left hand or an upright bass player, and ...


3

There is no special name. They're not even inversions - unless you want to call root C6 as an inversion of Am7 1st inversion - which it obviously isn't - it's the same chord with the same voicing. The names may well show what particular function one or the other has, as far as analysis is concerned, but in a piece of musc, particularly pop, there's no ...


3

By "unique" chord progressions, I would argue that he's saying that they're unique in comparison to other rock musicians. Because most of his progressions are, frankly, relative "classical" in nature. And so this is the trick: knowing that Elton is a classically trained musician, study some of the music that he would have studied to get a ...


2

...my songs are starting to sound alike One comment to start. This notation... ...A typical progression might be ( E / D / A / G ) -> C -> E. ...is a little unclear. I can't tell if E / D / A / G are options and then you continue with C and E power chords. At any rate, I think I get the general idea. Here are a few things to consider: If you always ...


2

E, Bm7, E, Bm7, C#, A#, G, B E Bm7 that's a root progression by fifth, ordinary, just as you said. Eventually the B chord returns to E, and the melody dwells on E. We could say it's nominally in E, but with all the chromaticism, it isn't strictly E major. The progression repeats so write that out for clarity... E Bm7 E Bm7 C# A# G B | E... The progression ...


2

Yes, of course you can put any notes you like in a chord, so the question is more about naming convention. Typically words augumented and diminished are used for triads only (at least in jazz/pop nomenclature). An exception is a fully diminished chord or diminished seventh chord 1 b3 b5 bb7, e.g. Eo7 (E G Bb Db). Extended chords still can have diminished/...


2

The note augmented or diminished in these chords is ^5. So C7+ will be spelt C E G♯ B♭. Cm7♭5 will be C E♭ G♭ B♭ - often referred to as C half-diminished. The same works for 9ths, but it's confusing as the 9th part itself can be seen as diminished - as C7 with D♭ added, or augmented - as C7 with D♯ added (as in the 'Hendrix' chord). Written names will help - ...


2

Option 1 My preference is G♯m♭6. Slimming things down to basic triads, we have A G#m F#m, a perfectly reasonable sequence of descending triads. By naming the chord this way, it best reflects the descending bass line as well as the fact that B and E are present in each chord. Option 2 The chord is EM7/G#, making the overall progression A(add2) EM7/G# F#m7/11....


2

In addition to other good points made: For me, in the context of jazz standards like "What's New?", with the piano left hand in that range, that tritone F B is the dominant feature, with whatever-it-is in the right hand being "just harmonics". Even without seeing the C-chord next (yes, as other have said, a C6/9...), I would wager that ...


2

There's two pairs of chords you're likely to come across doing this, exemplified by C6 / Am7 and Em7♭5 / Bbm6. There's no real confusion between the first two. They do different things - C6 is a tonic with a purely decorative added note, Am7 is likely to be part of a 'cycle of 5ths' sequence like Am7 - Dm7 - G7 - C. You will occasionally see a tonic C6 ...


2

It is indeed the NNS - Nashville Number System. Each chord in a key is given a number, corresponding to the note number in that key. Here, in D♭ - D♭ =1, E♭ = 2, F = 3, G♭ = 4, A♭ = 5, and B♭ = 6. That may seem to be extra stuff for little purpose - just write the perishing chords, please! But, the idea is far reaching. In the recording studio, for example, ...


2

Sounds like your problem is basically you are not good enough or quick enough changing chord shapes. It doesn't matter too much whether those chord shapes are major or minor, but you just happen to be weaker with, I guess, Am, Dm and Em. Which is strange, as all three shapes, on open chords, are actually easier to get to than C, F and G open! If you wish to ...


1

The term arpeggio gets used in two ways, as a type of embellishment of a chord represented by the ways line... ...and also to mean playing the tones of a chord separately in a line... The second mean is often called arpeggiation - as a process, like in composition - and sometimes it's called broken chord. The embellishment is normally played from bottom up,...


1

Yes there is indeed a term for this. This is a very interesting phenomenon of harmony. You have described it well, the same grouping of tones can be interpreted as two different chords depending on how we organize the tones in our mind. Just to make sure we are on the same page. An example could be the following two chords: F-A-C-D D-F-A-C The first chord ...


1

...Minor 6th chord containing the exact same notes as the Minor 7th Flat 5 AKA Half Diminished 7th chord but are in different root positions... Not different "root positions" I think you're looking for the terms "inversion." A min6 chord and min7b5 chord can be inversions of each other. It's funny you brought up the word "root" ...


1

Without knowing the context, such as the key of the song, the rest of the chords and their functions it is difficult to suggest an effective alternative chord progression. One thing I can suggest is a different way to play the C#m, which might make it easier for you to make the switch. Try 6-4-4-4. You can barre the top 3 strings with your 1st finger and ...


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