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3

I don't think there is one specific term to apply, but there are several to consider. The terms are about inversion (which chord tone is in the bass) and the voicing (the spaced between chord tones.) But your question complicates the matter, because of the way the two hands overlap in the top image. As notated the top image is... ...where I notated the &...


2

Here are some exercises by Nahre Sol. They focus on ii-V-I, but her ideas could be adapted to any chord changes you wanted to work on. Another exercise I like is to play four (or more) notes at random and try to resolve the resulting chord. This can be done looking at the keyboard or purely by ear/feel. Both are useful You might consider the book "...


2

A lot of things are going on in the song! The verse is in A minor, it starts with a simple Am/E vamp. Then it plays Dm/ Bb/D / C / G. The only "strange" chord is Bb/D, Bb in first inversion that is. It is the bII chord of the A minor scale and is called the neapolitan chord. It creates a very beautiful sound, because it encloses the A note between ...


2

Surprised that no-one has yet mentioned that VIIdim7 is a rootless (roll eyes) V7b9 chord. Many jazz players would consider that functionally there is no difference between V7 - I and VIIdim7 - I – if you have a functional cadence then any and all alterations are on the cards, to taste. Picking out whether the root is actually present or not seems like a ...


1

The name of a chord depends on the musical context. Out of context, they're identified by the pitches they contain. So your first example is a C#-minor chord in first inversion, and the second is an Ab-minor chord missing the fifth. This second chord, especially, as it is incomplete (only two distinct pitched), would need more context to give a definitive ...


1

Don‘t use the chord and rhythm mode. You’re a human and not a computer. The latter is over- exactly. May be this the problem, as you say you know the chords well.


1

Probably not what you want to hear, but tons of practice is the correct answer, and this goes for almost anything with music. From my experiences playing any instrument (and really anything in life that requires practice), you start slow and don't speed up until you can play it perfectly at a slow tempo. In the case of piano, I personally would section up ...


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