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8

In a word yes! The whole point of the minor blues scale notes is that they produce a 'sweet and sour' effect against the major scale notes. So out of tune that they sound (sort of) right! What happens with good blues players is that sometimes they bend the m3 up to a M3; although they also bend it half-way, and the listener 'hears' it go to M3, which, of ...


5

This chord is called Am maj9 ("A minor major 9"). On a chart it would often be written just a Am maj7, which describes the basic chord quality. The additional tension (9) would be left at the discretion of the musicians. Note that major 7th chords are often written using the triangle symbol Δ. This is also true for minor chords with a major seventh (and a ...


5

There seems to be some confusion based on the comments under the question. The term keyboard in this case is a synthesizer, that means an instrument with lots of sounds, often several hundreds of sounds and lots of different styles for the rhythm box. On such a keyboard the "one finger chords" is a standard option. You start the drum machine and then you ...


5

The first four bars go like this: |Cmaj9 | Gmaj7 |Bbmaj9 | Fmaj7 | G | C/E| Asus | ... with a melodic device in the first two bars on the G major scale that is repeated a whole tone lower (F major) in the next two (like the chords). So you have to see that chord as part of a sequence. So what is happening here is that the melody starts in G major, ...


4

It's very common in guitar chord voicings to omit the fifth without any specific marking for it, these are called "shell chords" (https://www.jazzguitarlessons.net/blog/shell-voicings-jazz-guitar) The fifth isn't a "guide tone," like the root or 3 or 7 which determines the quality of the chord (happy/sad/dominant/dissonant). It's a perfect interval, ...


3

You need to know which convention is being used, because there are more than one. One system simply uses upper case Roman numerals to indicate scale degrees with no reference to chord quality or scale type. For systems that use sharps and flats the basic idea is they alter the referenced scale degree from some prevailing default. In jazz and pop that ...


3

I'll agree with piiperi's answer that the surprise is the A7 chord (as OP suggested in the failure of the D7 to resolve properly), but otherwise I'd analyze the whole thing a bit differently. In particular, I'd say the A7 is actually what makes the song interesting -- what raised it from the pedestrian and turned it into a jazz standard. Perhaps not that ...


3

I don't know if OP is still working on this, but this seems to be a simple error in the formula given in the paper. The OP was on the right track with the "mismatch in domain." That is, the value of alpha (~0.6) that the authors state seems to be based on x and y in their equation being the number of semitones for each interval, as they then use in their ...


3

While a chord's quality (major, minor, diminished, etc.) is the primary factor in determining how it "feels", the context around it also plays a significant role. You are absolutely correct that the Ab, Eb and Db in your example feel a little less bright (a term I greatly prefer over happy) than an isolated major chord, but this has nothing to do with them ...


3

The "moods of keys" (or chords) is a centuries-old superstition in music, with many famous composers claiming to prefer a certain key for inducing certain emotions. This page has a list: https://www.wmich.edu/mus-theo/courses/keys.html I don't have perfect pitch and I can't differentiate between the keys by ear, but I've been told that with modern equal ...


3

Requests for resources are supposed to be off topic, so you got some downvotes. Nevertheless, this is one of my favorite cheat sheet(s) https://tobyrush.com/theorypages/en-uk/index.html


3

In Jazz usage "altered" refers to chords where the 5th or 9th (or both) are raised or lowered. Often a chord will have both raised and lowered notes simultaneously. There are various ways to notate the alterations: either with +/- or #/♭ Examples: C7+5 C7#5 C7♭5 C7+5+9 The notation C(alt) refers to a chord with both raised and lowered 5th and 9th. A ...


3

If you wonder about the Bbmaj7 chord you should also wonder about all the other chords in the intro, because none of them is part of A major. If you just listen to the intro (say, up to the G chord in bar 5), would you know that the song is in the key of A? My guess is that an honest answer would be 'no'. So it's pointless to analyze the intro in the key of ...


2

The term 'altered chord' is sometimes used to label an extended dominant 7th shape where only the 3rd and 7th remain unaltered. The 5th is both raised and lowered, likewise the 9th and 11th.


2

I'm not aware of a term for that exact progression, but it does remind me a bit of the stomp with that #4o7 used to ascend and the dominant being stressed before it repeats.


2

"Acceptable" doesn't matter in the following sense: unless you are using equal temperament, there will be an interval (or more than one) with two differing ratios. (You can prove this by the pigeonhole principle.) Whether one finds a mode in better or worse tuning than other modes on the same set of notes doesn't matter much either; once the basic intervals ...


2

In classical theory, an "altered chord" usually refers to a chord that contains non-diatonic notes, which are chromatically raised or lowered by a semitone from the usual notes of the scale. This encompasses a wide variety of possible chords, and many would even speak of altering the root of a chord, if it is a non-diatonic note within the local key/scale. ...


2

Mozart clearly implies a D7 chord, but if you want to write a C major chord there's nothing to stop you (but maybe you'll hear Mozart turning in his grave). If you do decide to write D7 than you have to make it work by voicing it well. That almost certainly means starting with the root in the bass instruments (including cello/bass). But if a unison C was ...


2

It can be sometimes that music which is unfamiliar to us in style doesn't sound like "music". What "sounds like music" to people is often that which is familiar to them, and often in a style that they heard a lot when quite young. (When I was young I became a jazz fan by listening to older style artists like Louis Armstrong and Count Basie - but the first ...


2

First off - the song is actually Isham Jones (lyrics Gus Kahn) and the song is a "jazz standard", and a stalwart of the gypsy jazz world (there are a heap of versions by Django and just about every guitarist in that genre knows it). Here's the Django version. It dates from 1923, and it is not unusual to see clever and creative chord sequences that don't ...


2

IMO the weird thing about it is not the D7, but the A7. It's clearly going to do a run-of-the-mill Cm6/A - D7 - Gm or G ... but instead of the expected G-based chord, it gives you an A7?? Why... to make an awkward transition to the Dm. I think that's the freaky part, like a third arm on a beauty queen. Maybe the composer or arranger ran out of time, they had ...


2

I've seen formatting like Gma7(no5) in guitar tabs. No idea if its standard or used in other contexts.


1

Yiruma is the 'River flows in you' guy? Sure, you can have lots of fun playing in that style. But, as you've discovered, that's just one small area of what a piano can do. If the dramatics of Beethoven or Chopin don't attract you, how about Debussy? Or the elegant simplicity of Mozart? ...


1

There are varying opinions on this But I think we have to keep numeral notation absolute, same as letter notation. Music doesn't stay neatly in one key or mode. It's bad enough having to establish where the tonic is at any time, without having to state whether you're numbering according to major, harmonic minor, melodic minor, natural minor, Dorian.. In ...


1

The first is correct: i VII VI V. Just make sure you clearly indicate that you're analyzing the passage as being in C minor. The context takes care of the rest. If, for argument's sake, the passage was otherwise in C major but those same Bb and Ab chords came up, then you would mark them as being flat: bVII bVI. Source: Tonal Harmony 5th Edition by Kostka ...


1

To try to answer your questions: (1) I don't know what you mean by "acceptable." Many just intonation scales use various types of modifications to generate flats and sharps. Sometimes they use the same modification everywhere; sometimes not. Sometimes they use both, creating two different accidentals, such as a different tuning for C-sharp vs. D-flat in ...


1

not all alterations make a chord an "altered" chord ... So which alterations don't make an altered chord? The German Wiki-page is different from the English version: It says altering the prime will be a different chord as the chord is named by the root note: e.g. Bb in C is a borrowed chord. Altering the 3rd will change the mode from major to minor and ...


1

There are some contexts where the phrase "dominant seventh" is used with a purely functional meaning, to refer strictly to a major-minor seventh built on the fifth scale degree, i.e., a V7*: the demand of the V7 for resolution is, to our ears, almost inescapably compelling. The dominant seventh is, in fact, the central propulsive force in our music; ...


1

In popular music they are typically considered interchangeable, so do whatever and likely no one will care. In classical music, chords should always be named according to their function. Determining a chord's function requires looking at the chords before and after it. In other words, context is everything. A "rule" of classical music is that dissonances ...


1

There are no rules to do it this way or that way. They are really almost exchangeable. When I remember how I "discovered" the ♭VI chord - before this I used to play IV - iv - and compared with this "new" ♭VI-chord I found this one less boring, more interesting, as the other one was somehow corny. (Today probably both are ;) Well, it must have been a gut ...


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