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9

The piano might not even be playing. If it is, it is indeed probably the best reference. However in other circumstances it is possible that you would play a slightly different pitch for (example) an E natural as the major third on a C chord, compared to the fifth on an A chord. To understand why this is, you need to understand how intervals (like major ...


5

This question is related to many others about leading tones and TET (equal temperament) with good answers and also wikipedia information like this here https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equal_temperament that render excellent explanations with background information so I can give you a short answer without repeating the entire history of music and temperament. ...


5

Assumption: G#,C#,C#,E,A,E = A/G# (A-maj7 in 3rd position) How to read? identify the bass tones (capo fret 4 = Ab/G# and Db/C#) either one or both will be played. capo can be ignored for the other strings! I have not learnt the tones in this high position but its quite easy to recognize that string 1 = octave -> E (string 2 = octave of B minus 2 ...


5

The first four bars go like this: |Cmaj9 | Gmaj7 |Bbmaj9 | Fmaj7 | G | C/E| Asus | ... with a melodic device in the first two bars on the G major scale that is repeated a whole tone lower (F major) in the next two (like the chords). So you have to see that chord as part of a sequence. So what is happening here is that the melody starts in G major, ...


4

If you wonder about the Bbmaj7 chord you should also wonder about all the other chords in the intro, because none of them is part of A major. If you just listen to the intro (say, up to the G chord in bar 5), would you know that the song is in the key of A? My guess is that an honest answer would be 'no'. So it's pointless to analyze the intro in the key of ...


3

This is really going to depend on the music. For example, if you are playing a first-inversion major chord (for example, you have a G♯ in an E-major chord) then your pitch should be lower than it would otherwise be (assuming that the E and B played by the other strings are in tune with the piano). However, nobody will notice this much unless the chord is ...


2

Mozart clearly implies a D7 chord, but if you want to write a C major chord there's nothing to stop you (but maybe you'll hear Mozart turning in his grave). If you do decide to write D7 than you have to make it work by voicing it well. That almost certainly means starting with the root in the bass instruments (including cello/bass). But if a unison C was ...


2

It appears this tune is in A Major. I'm only guessing, but I think this is why you have trouble understanding what's happening. Perhaps you assume that because it's declared in the key signature, the entire song must be in a single key from beginning to end, and so you should be able to apply the same explanation patterns of simple functional harmony ...


1

To me this song feels mostly like A-dorian, but using the major chord for the tonic. That's basically a Picardy third. But the main driving harmonic functional device is the slightly Irish-folksy ♭Ⅶ-Ⅰ, with the rather non-folksy twist that the ♭Ⅶ exploits the Dorian's ♯6 as its maj7 note. Cmaj9 is simply the relative major of A-minor. The chords after it ...


1

The first two bars are a G major chord. The next two are a D7 chord. Nothing ambiguous about that (although, of course, a re-harmonisation is always possible). If your task was to orchestrate, do just that. Keep it as a unison texture. Your job is to choose what instruments to use, not to re-compose it. Mozart filled in the G chord at the beginning. ...


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