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8

...or take a C7 chord and add a diminished ninth to it... A diminished ninth is actually enharmonically equal to an octave. So adding a diminished ninth actually just results in the same chord C7. Obviously they mean add a minor ninth to a dominant seventh chord. You can call that a dominant seventh, flat nine chord and it gets the symbol 7♭9. The word &...


7

Your confusion is understandable; there is certainly a gray area between tone clusters and extended chords where a group of notes could be viewed as both. Since you've been looking for definitions already, I'll try to supply one of my own. To me, a tone cluster is a collection of three or more pitches that includes at least two consecutive half-step ...


6

Simple answer: Written as F#9 it is most likely an F sharp chord with a ninth. An F chord with a sharp nine would probably be a dominant chord and be written as F7#9. Elaboration: Thanks for the comments! So just as F#13 is short for F#7,13, an F#9 can indeed be short for F#7,9. In my practice, I have rarely seen it abbreviated like that – maybe because of ...


3

Tone clusters are chords depending how you define chords. A tone cluster is just a chord made up of mostly seconds. Whether a chord is a tone cluster, a chord by seconds (a chord made by stacking major or minor seconds), or an inverted ninth chord is all dependent on context and can arguably be more than one of those depending what’s going on around it. Tone ...


3

I was able to google the book (see the image), but this doesn't help me to understand it. Perhaps it's a mistake, or they refer to the X7b9 chord symbol? Anyway, it X7b9 is a popular chord that can be played basically on any instrument capable of playing chords. Also the chord symbol is universal, nothing specific to piano about it. Later in the book (...


3

Just seeing F♯9, I'd play F♯, A♯, C♯, E and G♯, producing a dominant 9th on F♯. Context usually helps, though, and the following chord would be a big clue. If it was B♭, then the chord in question would most likely be F7♯9.


2

Just to add a bit to @Richard's answer. In common tonal harmony you often have intervals of harmonic seconds from things like inverted seventh chords or types of suspensions. For example V2/4 moving to I6, or a suspension like C F G resolving to C E G. But, notice how the seconds resolve to thirds. This provides tonal clarity so that the seconds sound like a ...


2

It is a poorly written passage. Some texts will take care to suggest specific voicings (different arrangements of notes in any given chord) for keyboard textures because realizing harmony on a keyboard has been such a big part of learning music. The other texture and usually the primary one harmony texts address is choral, but then one person cannot play the ...


1

Wouldn't that diminished chord be G♯ diminished, in key A? In which case, its notes will be G♯, B and D. So there's no problem - all those notes are diatonic anyway. The times notes may be written differently would be when there is a modulation, but generally, in sharp keys it's traditional (and clearer) to stick with sharps whenever possible.


1

Chord names will never occur isolated! Context would help like Tim says. The writing with the computer keys is F# 9 = Fsharp 9 or F #9 = F7 #9, but normally the printing of a notation program or professional layout should be F# (sharp=subscript)and 9 or F (#9=superscript). Everything else (as asking without context) is just confusing or fishing for ...


1

Tone cluster, note cluster, pitch cluster To add further to answers... and not a conclusive answer... ... the term tone cluster occurs in phonology (seems to be about different vowel sounds in a multi-syllabic words. e.g. to—ma—to has a tone cluster, ga—ga doesn't ). Maybe the term is borrowed from phonology. It occurs notably in piano music and I'd imagine ...


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