Hot answers tagged

28

No, and for at least three reasons: Assuming "chord" to be a tonal entity, we can explain anything as having alterations, omissions, and extensions. With add11, ♭13, no5, etc., we can make sense of any combination of tones. We can understand harmonies as combinations of chords; such polychords allow any and all possibilities. We have systems of ...


26

Just like piano, you have to know the instrument to comfortably be able to form chords; unlike piano, most notes on the guitar can be played in the same octave at 3, 4, 5 locations on the fretboard. This makes it challenging to develop a mental map of the fretboard, and it may seem like a daunting project at first. Systems like CAGED (which I am frankly not ...


23

No, not if by inferred you mean unambiguously deduced. For example, organists have developed the reharmonization of hymn tunes into a fine art. Yes, if by inferred you mean finding chords that more or less fit. That's because harmonization is possible at all. Some sequences of chords will fit better (by various criteria) than others, of course. ...


21

If you are wanting to stick with standard tuning, then obviously there's no note lower than the low E in the open E chord - but as a chord, this D/F# (or 'first inversion' of D) might give some impression of being lower, partly because two of the strings (A and D) play a note that is a tone lower than in the open E chord: %2/.0/.0/.2/.3/.2/[D/F#] Here's a ...


21

Most instuments have key that are easier to play than others. With brass instruments, you'll see lots of pieces with two or three flats; if you go back to your beginner piano literature, you will find that much will be in C/ Am, or in G/ Em, or F / Dm. With the guitar, the "easy" keys are the ones that have open strings (E A D G b e) in their diatonic chords....


19

The octave your violinist suggested is fine. Another possibility is the following: Why did Beethoven not write the above chord in his piano sonata? Because that major tenth is rather awkwardly wide for a pianist's hand. The chord he did write spans only an octave and so fits the pianist's hand. People writing for the piano prefer what is easier (and prefer ...


19

You are actually playing a Cb major, enharmonic equivalent of B. It sounds good because Cb can be seen as borrowed from the parallel minor (Eb minor), so you get that juicy, unexpected sound. It works because it resolves back to Eb (in second inversion) this way: Gb -> G Eb -> Eb Cb -> Bb You can notate the chord as bVI. Experiment in other keys as well! ...


18

Use a Drop-D tuning along with the traditional open D-major chord. Or alternatively try a DADGAD tuning and finger accordingly.


18

The notes and chord symbols are two separate complementary things. The Dm chord symbol is a short summary, abstraction, description, simplification of the overall harmony which continues until the next chord symbol, and the notes ("dots") are a concrete realization written out as notes. You could ignore the chord symbols and just play the notes, even ...


17

"If I skip any note, its gonna make it another chord..." No. First: despite the 'pile of 3rds' method of constructing chords in our textbooks, in a 13th chord the 5th may be omitted, the 9th is often omitted and the 11th is ALWAYS omitted. (OK, ALWAYS is just asking for people to come up with exceptions. But it's near enough, and we're talking about the ...


15

Never. C° is always C diminished. C major seventh can be signed with a triangle after the C. Bear in mind that half-diminished is signified by a circle with a diagonal line through it. Cmaj7 is C E G B. C°7 is C E♭ G♭ B♭♭. C half dim. is C E♭ G♭ B♭. Note: they all contain C E G B something.


14

A tenth is just a fancy way of saying a third, used when the notes are an octave farther apart than normal. Try counting up from the root C to find the diatonic 10th: C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C-D-E. Notice that going from C to the high E is a distance of 10 (counting the first C as 1, since there's no such thing as a 0th). The tenth takes specific qualities like the ...


14

The bass is the critical part. D means play a D major chord ...and by default the bass should be D the chord's root. D/F# is a so-called slash chord (or an inverted chord is standard music theory) which means play a D major chord ...but play F# - the chord's third - in the bass. NOTE: When the third of a major chord is in the bass, there is a strong ...


13

An awful lot of guitar tutors , books and sites seem to feel that every guitar chord must be played in root position. In fairness, it is the most solid sound of a chord, in comparison to the 1st and 2nd (and 3rd) inversions. The open G shape, and open E shape chords automatically give root positions, and A shape and C shape give root if played from 5th ...


13

I'd say you haven't looked hard enough. But in guitar based songs (those originally written for the guitar, or for ensembles that prominently feature the guitar) they're going to be a little less common. Any instrument has keys that are going to be more comfortable to play in. For the guitar, those are G, D, A, and E - each of those has very finger-...


13

In that sort of notation, you're supposed to keep playing/strumming the chord until told otherwise. C In this song you play the same chord all the way all the way from beginning to end, hooray all the way


13

This may be helpful. Start by learning to hear the difference between major and minor thirds. Find four songs, one that begins with a rising major third, one with a rising minor third, one with a falling major third and one with a falling minor third. Then you can match an interval that you hear with one of those. So, for example, "Dixieland" begins with a ...


13

Yes, seventh chords are made up using 4 notes. 1,3,5 and 7. That's why they are named 'seventh' chords. But that's going to be too simple! There are quite a few different 7th chords, and the one you're asking about is the dominant seventh.It's actually a chord that belongs to key F, rather than key C. The B♭ note that's added to the basic triad doesn't ...


13

You cannot omit an altered fifth. In other words, you cannot omit the b5 from either a half-diminished chord or a diminished chord, or the #5 from an augmented chord. The omission of the 5th only works for unaltered fifths that are implied by the harmonic overtones of the root.


12

It seems like if I memorized the relative intervals between the notes on each string, it would help a lot with quickly making chords and such. It seems a lot easier than trying to memorize individual notes Yes, of course! The majority of guitarists have a way to think "directly" in relative terms - often using shapes as mnemonic aid. If you think in terms ...


12

If you multiply both sides of the ratio by the same factor, the ratio doesn't change, so 2:3 is the same as 4:6 (just takes twice as long). So, in the time it takes the root to oscillate 4 times, the Major third oscillates 5 times and the perfect fifth oscillates 6 times, giving us a combined ratio of 4:5:6. More generally, we just need to put it in the ...


12

You're still holding the C root at the bottom, so calling it a C chord of some sort is justified. You eventually also hold E (not F), B flat, D, and A at the fermata signs, so calling it a C13 chord (which should contain C, E, B flat, and A at the very least) is also justified. The C13 chord symbol looks fine.


12

A commonly used way to play those chords is: D : play the three-note chord D, F#, A with your right hand, and D with your left hand an octave or two lower. D/F# : play the same three-note chord D, F#, A with your right hand, but F# with your left hand. When your left hand plays low bass notes, the ”inversions” marked using slash chords are right, no matter ...


11

You could make chords out of blue notes, but why would you? In general the blues scale(s) is only applied in certain circumstances: unsurprisingly, in blues music. The best answer to this kind of question, in my opinion, is to observe blues music to determine blues' chords. You certainly could write blues music with chords like the ones you listed above, ...


11

I'm afraid a tendency to work just with 'the changes' and ignore the original melody is endemic in today's jazz world. Particularly if your improvisation technique is based on the chord=scale system. I agree that it's an excellent idea to start of by presenting the original melody. Many players don't. What can I say? You've noticed that your ...


11

My gut assumption given your example lead sheet is that the empty slash presumes that the base chord to the left of it will still be used. For example, in your example, the "A /C#" would mean "A A/C#".


11

The standard tuning of the bass strings are the same as the bottom four of standard guitar tuning - E, A, D, G - but one octave lower. The tones of chords are the same between the instruments except they sound one octave lower on bass. So A2 E3 A3 C#4 on guitar will sound A1 E2 A2 C#3 on bass guitar, and the fretting can be the same. In terms of how to ...


11

You can ask the Greek or look up the theories of Boethius, Glarean, Caspar Printz, Ernst Kurth etc ... The answers will be more traditional than opinion based. But did you look up wikipedia under characteristics / qualities of intervals? I did and couldn’t find much information. The key words are psycological effects of harmonical intervals The idea that ...


11

Don't be so literal minded. This is easy to play, and effective: If the quartet know the original piano version, they can easily simulate the arpeggio simply by violin 2 playing a bit ahead of the beat. Trying to get Violin 1 to play all four notes as written will probably be sound clumsy at this tempo, and it won't be as "ff" as something easier to play ...


11

The piano might not even be playing. If it is, it is indeed probably the best reference. However in other circumstances it is possible that you would play a slightly different pitch for (example) an E natural as the major third on a C chord, compared to the fifth on an A chord. To understand why this is, you need to understand how intervals (like major ...


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