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31

It doesn't sound inherently better or worse than the narrow root-3rd-5th voicing, just different. Somewhat palpably, a narrow-voiced chord will tend to sound intimate, focused, unitary, whereas a wide voicing will sound more open, dreamy or adventurous. But the reason for a given voicing of one chord can usually not be reduced to just its sound as such, but ...


28

With all due respect, you are doing your students a grave disservice by not having them read sheet music from the start. Yes, chords and finger patterns are very important, but nobody can become a skilled pianist without being able to read the charts. Not all music is simple folk tunes! Beyond just learning to read notes and chord groups, there's rhythm, ...


28

No, and for at least three reasons: Assuming "chord" to be a tonal entity, we can explain anything as having alterations, omissions, and extensions. With add11, ♭13, no5, etc., we can make sense of any combination of tones. We can understand harmonies as combinations of chords; such polychords allow any and all possibilities. We have systems of ...


26

Just like piano, you have to know the instrument to comfortably be able to form chords; unlike piano, most notes on the guitar can be played in the same octave at 3, 4, 5 locations on the fretboard. This makes it challenging to develop a mental map of the fretboard, and it may seem like a daunting project at first. Systems like CAGED (which I am frankly not ...


24

The flute, like most wind instruments, is considered to be monophonic (as opposed to a piano, which is polyphonic), meaning you can only play one note at a time (within reasonable ability). However, there exist "extended techniques" on the flute that go beyond the standard teachings. In this case, "multiphonics" (which is an odd term, since "multi-" is ...


23

No, not if by inferred you mean unambiguously deduced. For example, organists have developed the reharmonization of hymn tunes into a fine art. Yes, if by inferred you mean finding chords that more or less fit. That's because harmonization is possible at all. Some sequences of chords will fit better (by various criteria) than others, of course. ...


21

From a pedagogical standpoint, consider all of the things an "absolute beginner" would have to learn in order to perform this piece: Note names in treble clef Note names in bass clas Note values of whole, half, quarter, eighth, and sixteenth Dotted note values Rest values of eighth and sixteenth (and result syncopation) Ties Accidentals Fermata Notation ...


21

If you are wanting to stick with standard tuning, then obviously there's no note lower than the low E in the open E chord - but as a chord, this D/F# (or 'first inversion' of D) might give some impression of being lower, partly because two of the strings (A and D) play a note that is a tone lower than in the open E chord: %2/.0/.0/.2/.3/.2/[D/F#] Here's a ...


21

Most instuments have key that are easier to play than others. With brass instruments, you'll see lots of pieces with two or three flats; if you go back to your beginner piano literature, you will find that much will be in C/ Am, or in G/ Em, or F / Dm. With the guitar, the "easy" keys are the ones that have open strings (E A D G b e) in their diatonic chords....


19

As is so often the case in music, a label depends on how something is functioning in context. There are several possibilities for this chord, and they can resolve variously to (at least) chords on B, F, E, or B♭. Prepare for a bit of an onslaught! 1. A French Augmented-Sixth Chord in E Technically speaking, your listing of Root, major third, major second, ...


19

I think the confusion here is that it doesn't matter what order the notes are in. Think of a piano for second...you can pick any D, any F# and any A anywhere on the piano regardless of what order or how much space is in between the notes and you will still have a D major triad. You can also pick 2 or 3 of any notes and you would still have a D triad. Same ...


19

The octave your violinist suggested is fine. Another possibility is the following: Why did Beethoven not write the above chord in his piano sonata? Because that major tenth is rather awkwardly wide for a pianist's hand. The chord he did write spans only an octave and so fits the pianist's hand. People writing for the piano prefer what is easier (and prefer ...


18

Use a Drop-D tuning along with the traditional open D-major chord. Or alternatively try a DADGAD tuning and finger accordingly.


17

"If I skip any note, its gonna make it another chord..." No. First: despite the 'pile of 3rds' method of constructing chords in our textbooks, in a 13th chord the 5th may be omitted, the 9th is often omitted and the 11th is ALWAYS omitted. (OK, ALWAYS is just asking for people to come up with exceptions. But it's near enough, and we're talking about the ...


16

Anything over a 7th must contain that 7th, be it major 7th or minor (b) seventh. It's been well established that the 5th (perfect) can be dispensed with, as its sound is contained in the root note. For me, 9ths must have 1,3,7 and 9 - although if there's an instrument playing the root, such as a bass, it can be pared down to 3,7 and 9. Often in jazz, a four ...


15

It's actually a suspension, which is to say that the actual chord is F Minor (F, A-flat, C, in first inversion) but the G and B-flat are held over from the previous chord before moving to F and A-flat. Dissonant suspensions resolving to consonant chords are very common in Baroque music. In jazz, 9th chords are treated as normal chords, so a G#maj9 might ...


15

A tenth is just a fancy way of saying a third, used when the notes are an octave farther apart than normal. Try counting up from the root C to find the diatonic 10th: C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C-D-E. Notice that going from C to the high E is a distance of 10 (counting the first C as 1, since there's no such thing as a 0th). The tenth takes specific qualities like the ...


14

Of course, In the key of G major the following chords are part of the scale: G Maj, A min, B min, C Maj, D Maj, E min, F# dim. That pattern is valid for any Key, {I, IV, V} are Maj, {ii, iii, vi} are minor, vii is diminished. Your progression is a I --> vi --> V --> ii. On another note you can use any chords you want if they sound cool.


14

To answer the question of whether the C chord is "really" V of V, you need to remember one simple fact about music. When you listen to music, you hear it progressing in time. Therefore, analysing any chord in terms of "what comes after it" by looking at the score is just an intellectual exercise, if it has no relationship to what the music actually sounds ...


13

All scales? Majors, minors (x3), pentatonics, blues, modes, chromatics, whole tone, diminished?!! In reality, now's a good time to learn how to read yourself. Being serious - one of the best ways to learn something is to teach it. At the level of your student, you'll be ahead of him, and while you're learning about it yourself, showing him will help you. ...


13

Yep, it is! G♯ is the root, and B, D, and F are the third, fifth, and seventh, respectively. Notice that, since B is in the bass, this is in first inversion, so it's a vii°6/5. As it often the case with the vii°6/5, it resolves to tonic in first inversion so that the diminished fifth B–F can resolve inward, with the B resolving up the tonic's chordal third ...


13

You wouldn't be able to play the D and the F# at the same time because they are on the same string. The only way to play both notes would be to play the D on the 5th fret of the A string, resulting in this chord: This is far more difficult to play and the sound of the chord is arguably very similar.


13

An awful lot of guitar tutors , books and sites seem to feel that every guitar chord must be played in root position. In fairness, it is the most solid sound of a chord, in comparison to the 1st and 2nd (and 3rd) inversions. The open G shape, and open E shape chords automatically give root positions, and A shape and C shape give root if played from 5th ...


13

I'd say you haven't looked hard enough. But in guitar based songs (those originally written for the guitar, or for ensembles that prominently feature the guitar) they're going to be a little less common. Any instrument has keys that are going to be more comfortable to play in. For the guitar, those are G, D, A, and E - each of those has very finger-...


13

In that sort of notation, you're supposed to keep playing/strumming the chord until told otherwise. C In this song you play the same chord all the way all the way from beginning to end, hooray all the way


13

This may be helpful. Start by learning to hear the difference between major and minor thirds. Find four songs, one that begins with a rising major third, one with a rising minor third, one with a falling major third and one with a falling minor third. Then you can match an interval that you hear with one of those. So, for example, "Dixieland" begins with a ...


12

This is just poor notation, plain and simple. My guess is that you're supposed to play the D and A♭ below middle C here, with both pitches in the right hand. Do you have a recording of this piece? If so, your best bet is to listen to the recording and see if that is in fact D/A♭ there. Otherwise, perhaps there's a system in place at musicnotes.com that ...


12

I think this excerpt is just wrong. As I read the score (page 96), it is in fact just this (transposition resolved to concert pitch): X:1 L:1/8 M:3/4 K:Dm %%score Fl Ob Cl Bn Hn1 Hn2 Trp Tpn V:Fl clef=treble name="Flutes" V:Ob clef=treble name="Oboes" V:Cl clef=treble name="Clarinets" V:Bn clef=bass name="Bassoons" ...


12

You could make chords out of blue notes, but why would you? In general the blues scale(s) is only applied in certain circumstances: unsurprisingly, in blues music. The best answer to this kind of question, in my opinion, is to observe blues music to determine blues' chords. You certainly could write blues music with chords like the ones you listed above, ...


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