New answers tagged

8

I‘ve found this picture: I‘ve encountered this picture recently here: https://www.musical-u.com/learn/how-to-use-circle-fifths/ It says: Russian composer and music theorist Nikolay Diletsky set this whole wheel rolling in the late 1670’s. He intended his book Grammatika as a guide to composition, but with the rules of music theory in mind.


7

from the Wikipedia article In the late 1670s a treatise called Grammatika was written by the Ukrainian composer and theorist Mykola Dylets'kiy. Diletskii’s Grammatika is a treatise on composition, the first of its kind, which targeted Western-style polyphonic compositions. It taught how to write kontserty, polyphonic a cappella, which were normally based ...


3

As JimM said in a comment, this piece is not in F♯ but in G♭. The A is thus the scale degree A♭, chromatically raised. It wants to resolve upwards to B♭. If you want more motivation: the last harmony under the A is a chord with pitches (from lowest to highest) C♭E♭F A. Rearranging these to make a stack of thirds: F A C♭E♭. The A is, as I said, just A♭, ...


4

In general, older (like pre 1000AD theorists) counted only intervals from the bass. Thus, a major chord has the ration 4:5:6. This is enough to calculate other ratios though. The musical reason is that intervals against the bass supposedly (I think so too) show up stronger than against other voices. (Thus the dissonance of the fourth against the bass as ...


2

I'll call these other intervals: imaginary intervals Where are these additional ratios within the chord ratio equation? With the ratios 8:10:12:15, it does contain the imaginary interval ratios. As every number is a ratio to each other. For example if you had 5 bananas to 3 apples to 4 pears, there would be the ratios 5 bananas : 3 apples and 5 bananas to ...


9

where are these additional ratios within the chord ratio equation? They're right there, almost in plain sight - all you have to do is simplify the numbers: Major 3rd - C - E - (4:5) = 8:10:12:15 Perfect 5th - C - G - (2:3) = 8:10:12:15 Major 7th - C - B - (8:15) = 8:10:12:15 Minor 3rd - E - G - (5:6) = 8:10:12:15 Perfect 5th - E - B (2:3) = 8:10:12:15 ...


1

The dominant seventh is undeniably relevant, and a diminished chord occurs inside a dominant seventh. For instance in the key of C, the upper triad of the G7th chord (G-B-D-F), is the B diminished chord. The dissonance of that B-F tritone in the dominant seventh is what contributes to its drive to resolution to the tonic. Therefore, the diminished chord is ...


0

I've given this some thought and it occurs to me that diminished chords are actually much more advanced than others and less understood by the lay musician and therefore not used musically as often. But they do have a distinct emotional impact whether used alone or in combination with other chords to convey a musical message, so I believe their value ...


4

The three notes you mentioned (A/A#/B) could be written A/Bb/Cb. And, yes, music for piano that is harmonically adventurous has chords like that in it all the time. Every note can be written several ways. C = B#, Dbb C# = Db, B## D = C##, Ebb etc. When writing music that is not strictly tonal, the rules about how to show tonality are irrelevant. Use the ...


0

Not as technical as the others, and sorry I'm ignoring your "circle of fifths" argument. My answer is: The diminished chord is a weird chord... it's a minor flat 5 with no note being the root because they're all a tone and a half apart. It has no identy so to speak... doesn't sound major, doesn't sound minor, doesn't have that obvious 7th. It's a really ...


3

I’m not sure what instrument could possibly do this, perhaps a piano with five or more people sitting at it, but I would just put a rhythm slash with a note saying “play all the notes available over the range of the instrument.” If you just want a very dense tone cluster, then two separate chord shapes with the appropriate accidental next to each other ...


2

Q: What bass string to use? A: Use the string that has the note you want to play as the lowest note. If you want to play the chord's root note as the lowest note, then use the string that has the root note. If you want to play some other note as the bass note, then use whatever string has that note. The bass note and the root note of the chord are not ...


2

In addition to Your Uncle Bob's very clear answer. There isn't really 'you are supposed to...'. The bass note is often the root, and yes, played with thumb. Main reasons - thumb is just where it needs to be, and the sound is good for a bass note. Fingers can and do go where necessary. That's not always the case then of index here, ring there etc. A lot of ...


3

Latin pop music is to some extent based on interlocking patterns in the rhythm section (piano, guitar, bass, 47,275 drums). The piano part is (in some styles) called a montuno (so is the loud parts of some pieces too). The montuno is generally two measures (or 8 beats depending on how the composer chose the notation) based on another pattern called the clave....


9

Yes, you're right that in many genres of music pianists and guitarists have to spontaneously come up with parts based only on chord symbols (and hopefully also listening to other members of the band). This is called comping. Bass players typically also have to do this too; even if the bassline is written out in that piece that isn't always the case (and if ...


4

Barre chords are transpositions of open chords; the root note stays on the same string: An open E chord has the root on the 6th string, and so does any E-shape barre chord. An open A chord has the root on the 5th string, and so does any A-shape barre chord. An open D chord has the root on the 4th string, and so does any D-shape barre chord. Any ...


6

Pianists and guitarists in these styles are expected to be able to play from chord names and bass lines. If you cannot find an Fm6 in a heartbeat then this means more practice. As for the comping style, this varies between players and genres and is up to you. On the guitar it may be just four downstrokes per bar, a funky cross-rhythm in the style of Nile ...


3

A chord progression is a list of chords. A chord's voicing is the arrangement of notes within that chord. But you seem to be asking about something else, the rhythmic element of 'comping' in various styles. Yes, different comping styles for different musical styles. For a low-down blues you might simply play basic close-position chords 4-to-the-bar. In ...


1

I haven't seen the sheet music but it sounds and looks like C#/G#-F#/C#. The lowest notes are G#-C# (leapibg doen a fifth or up a fourth).


5

This is one of the most common misconceptions in aspiring musicians. Saying that because D♯ and E♭ (or any pair of "enharmonic" notes) sound the same, therefore you can choose either one is like saying that because "they're" and "there" sound the same, you can use either spelling. They have the same sound, but differing semantics. There are ...


0

Diminished chords (triads) are made up from a root note, a m3 and a diminished 5. Therefore, using A as the root, the m3 will be C natural, and the D5 E♭. That's how it's spelled. Yes, on a lot of instruments you could play A, C D# notes, and it would sound exactly the same. But that's not the point. The point is it's called A diminished for a reason. ...


2

The first is C♯ major triad.In 2nd inversion. But needs spelling G♯ C♯ E♯. There's no F as such - just sounds like it! The other is fine as is. F♯ major triad in 2nd inversion.


3

I agree with Timinycricket that this is most likely just a notation-mangled C♯ major chord in second inversion. However, it could also be something different where the note names are actually correct: a G♯ diminished seventh chord in the key of A major. The C♯ would in this case be a non-chord tone, which is possible if it's part of a melodic voice, ...


3

That is a C sharp major chord and an F sharp major chord with an incorrectly named third on the C sharp chord. And yes they are in second inversion if left to right is ascending.


-1

I am not a violinist. If anyone can correct me, please do so and I will update this answer as necessary: Play the chord as is. It isn't impossible to quadruple stop, just hard. Because the bridge is curved, in order to strike all four strings simultaneously, you need to physically bend the two strings in the middle. This detunes the notes on those strings ...


0

I'm a bit attached to the dramatic effect of having the first real chord of the piece - FORTISSIMMO - there... I would suggest a more radical change: 0) Transpose the whole piece up a whole step, so that for the string quartet, you're writing in g minor. (Beethoven arranged exactly one of his piano sonatas for string quartet, Op. 14 No. 1 - the piano ...


-1

Don’t draw attention to it. Don’t make it stick out and ungainly. It’s a detail leading to a cadence . You are pedantically stuck trying to translate piano into violin. It’s the leading (note of a short phrase)soon forgotten


1

To play a chord on a bowed string instrument, even if by necessity of string crossings it is a spread chord (i.e. arpeggiated), the key point is that you want to be able to put all of your fingers in the necessary positions at the same time. That is impossible for the four note chord written. It would be possible to rewrite the chord to be playable, by ...


12

Don't be so literal minded. This is easy to play, and effective: If the quartet know the original piano version, they can easily simulate the arpeggio simply by violin 2 playing a bit ahead of the beat. Trying to get Violin 1 to play all four notes as written will probably be sound clumsy at this tempo, and it won't be as "ff" as something easier to play ...


19

The octave your violinist suggested is fine. Another possibility is the following: Why did Beethoven not write the above chord in his piano sonata? Because that major tenth is rather awkwardly wide for a pianist's hand. The chord he did write spans only an octave and so fits the pianist's hand. People writing for the piano prefer what is easier (and prefer ...


9

Disclaimer: I'm not a violinist. What follows is all head-knowledge, not practical experience. As you know, since a violin bridge is curved, no more than two strings can sound at a time, so any chord will of course need to be arpeggiated. This isn't that big a deal, and is part of the characteristic sound of violin stops. However, you also need to consider ...


4

Your arpeggiated chord is perfectly fine. All four notes can be played in 2nd position on the A and E strings only (not as a quadruple stop). It could also be played in 3rd position on the D, A and E strings. Of course only the top C note will be sustained, but the effect will still be there.


0

You might be able to meet in the middle and use a triple grace note, like in the next measure, only on C-F-A. Only having to sustain the high C might take it from impossible to challenging, while still maintaining all the notes from the original in some form. That said, I'm not a violinist and have no clue if this would actually work, so definitely run this ...


0

I have found that some pitch recognition software has trouble identifying sung notes - especially if you have a "rich/complex" voice. I think maybe because the 2nd harmonic (or higher ones) can be in fact louder than the "actual" note sung and it gets confused? Not sure. But I have seen it happen. A progam I like to see what note you are singing is ...


1

Yes, it's possible, like Tim says. In early counterpoint it was even the rule that the final chord has no 3rd - in purpose to end in a perfect tonic. Even by Bach we can find still this practice. There are 2 voice-canons missing the full harmony if sang without accompaniment like this one: youtube.com/watch?v=AGrsasgsFuQ My question is: do we still speak ...


2

For a start, if a chord has only two notes it isn't a triad. It might IMPLY a particular triad, or be viewed as an incomplete triad. But a triad has three notes. The example you give is certainly possible. In an F major context he bass notes - G, C - clearly outline a ii, V cadence all by themselves. Omitting the 3rd of the first chord means it isn't ...


3

It may be that you're singing 'in the cracks'. It may be that you have an idea of the shape of your melody but are singing each phrase in a different key due to vocal limitations. Or it may be something else. But without actually hearing you we're just guessing. Maybe, if you posted a recording of you singing we could help more. But ideally arrange a ...


0

For definite you're not singing a tune that would be considered chord like as to my knowledge, we don't sing in multiple pitches simultaneously. I think i have seen people sing maybe in two pitches simultaneously but it is a very fine skill and not an accidental one, plus it still wouldn't be a chord but an interval. Even singing out of tune, doesn't ...


1

For the cadence from Gmin to Cmaj: Ommiting the third (Bb) of Gmin would make it Gind as it is "indeterminate". It is arguable whether a cadence can have the third ommitted because it makes it extremely weak. I could also find no cases of such a cadence. Furthermore, this would mean that it is also not an imperfect cadence. So while this is possible, its ...


4

I agree with Albrecht's answer that you should record yourself then transcribe what you are singing. But I will also add this. The human voice can sing a continuum of tones and most modern instruments, especially the piano, cannot! You may be singing notes that simply do not exist in 12TET tuning. This is not a bad thing as plenty of cultures, e.g. India,...


10

Your playing needs to be in the same key you're thinking about i.e. singing in, and there are basically two different approaches to do the coordination. A: playing adjusts to singing: find the key you're singing in B: singing adjusts to playing: give yourself a harmonic reference before starting to sing, in order to try and force the singing to be in a key ...


1

You could „record“ your song with help of a notation program (singing and converting wave to midi, and try to let it harmonize by the software and show the sheet music. But you will be more successful learning the fundamentals of harmony and chord progression and improve your music knowledge, ear training, solfège, chords etc.


2

because the guitar's potential is best exploited by arranging for it in keys more natural to the guitar, that means keys up to three sharps such as G, D, and A, or one flat, such as F, and all the relative minor keys of those keys. It's like any other string instrument: it is best exploited by using keys that use open strings. However, that doesn't mean ...


1

audio signal may mean you’re looking for a wave to midi converter? Finale has one built in but it works only for a single voice. A midi converter usually is not useful to analyse and transcribe chords into midi data.


3

Question 1 This question revolves around finding the formula of a chord ratio when i utilise not only 2 or 3 intervals but 4,5,6,etc. Answer 1: The more intervals you introduce the more difficult this becomes. The process, however, is exactly the same, just with more numbers. This is the general formula: A1:B, A2:C, A3:D Now we need A1, A2 and A3 ...


3

The key signature shown there doesn't affect the notes in the triad, as you've correctly worked out. It's just there because it's the signature for the key of F major. The author has just chosen to show the one flat of F major because that's the key they're talking about: it might be confusing to see the F major triad in a C major key signature. It doesn't ...


1

Triads are indeed formed from 1, 3 and 5 of a key, or the scale from that key. So in key C, 1 3 and 5 are C E and G, as you state. On to the F triad. Exactly the same idea - but now we count from F. 1 3 5 is F A C. Do the same for G, if you like - G B D. It all works as simply as that. However (there's often a however!) sharps and flats in certain keys ...


2

From a legal basis, who knows. Well, maybe the people at https://law.stackexchange.com/ do, but as there has been at least one court case that has found an artist guilty of copying the "feel" of another song, It doesn't seem that you'd ever be totally safe legally re-using a more tangible element such as a chord progression. From a moral standpoint - again,...


1

What key you are in, depends on where you feel the home note ("tonic") is, and that depends on how you play the melody. The chords Am7 - Gm7 - C7 - F could just as well be in a passage that's "in C", or one that's "in F", or many other things. Where's your home note, what note feels like being a natural ending? Here are two examples of how to use the same ...


3

You absolutely CAN improvise in Am over the Am chord and then, when the F chord comes, improvise in F. There's no musical rule that all chords in a song, or even a section of a song, must fit into the same scale. But, in this case, you might find it useful to think of the song being in F major.


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