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All the chords are Bb, Ab, Eb in that order (which eschews a descending fifth progression, common in rock) ...except the one Db which is just interposed between two Eb chords. The only thing you can get from that is a likely key signature of three flats with a Db thrown in. You could label it like a blues turnaround V IV I that would make the tonic Eb and ...


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If you are able to write lyrics and melody, you have written your song. Harmony (chords) actually fall into the category of arranging the song for performance. If you are not a musician you have the option of studying to become one, or finding another musician who can help you develop your song. Another option is to look for an educated arranger who can ...


3

Here are a few general tips: Expand the bassline (e.g., descending whole steps, moving around the circle of fourths, etc.), then harmonize the added bass notes with chords that fit the melody. For example, in m. 1 of Möge, the bass moves from an F to a C. So let's add stepwise chordal movement: F-Eb-Db-C. Now we have to find chords that work with the melody....


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/ Fmaj7 E♭o Gm7 C7♭9 / Dm7 G9 Am7 D9 / B♭ - F - / G Gm7 C7 C+ / Fmaj7 E♭o Gm7 C7♭9 / Dm7 G9 Am7 D9 / B♭ -C7 - / Fsus4 - F A7 / Dm - A7 - / Dm - B♭6 - / Fmaj7 - G9 - / Gm7 Gm7♭5 C7 C+ / The rest is up to you! Ideas behind it are melody notes that are included in the chords, with some ii-V-I sequences. Use of ...


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This is a standard chord progression you’ll find in hundreds of pop- and folk songs. (Pachelbel Canon). There is not much to change here. F Dm Bb will remain the same, the chords between could be replaced by A7 but this won’t make it more jazzy. It is the rhythm and the style of singing (groove) that will give another touch to this song. (Swing, or ...


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Yes, they indicate rhythm. This is hybrid form of tab that combines numeric notation with the rhythmic part of traditional notation.


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Definitions are not always that strictly adhered to, and different authors/sources may use slightly different definitions. It's pretty common usage to define "available tension" just for a certain chord type, without considering a related scale. E.g., a Cmaj7 chord could be used as a I chord in major (where the #11 wouldn't available diatonically), but it ...


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Probably not yet,but in the future... Problem is, given two or three notes from part of a melody may - or may not - fit to one chord. Often there are several choices, which is one reason most melodies can be, and are, particularly in jazz, re-harmonised. Nothing wrong with that, except the options grow in number as any melody progresses. A programmed app ...


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Fortepiano and Sforzando basically mean the same thing in piano scores. Just treat the fp as an sfz(big accent on the first chord, quiet after the chord) and you'll do fine. I go a bit to the extreme with my own interpretation, a forte dynamic followed by a dynamic closer to pianissimo than piano, a mezzo pianissimo in a sense. But, you don't have to do that....


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Not really. To make a chord you need 3 or more (or at least 2) notes. An app may be able to transcribe the melody you're singing, but it will be up to you to choose the other notes to create a chord. If you learn some basic chords, maybe enough to play a few songs in similar styles to the ones you want to write. then you should be able to make a decent ...


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It seems to me that playing 7 chords make mixo easy and a flat 7. I like bouncing modes/ in more of a chord tone type of way. It's like having what I would call pivot points in a song. You can pivot to another mode without traveling. I may start on e minor and pull a major swing out and float on down to mixolydian by using seventh chords and making sure to ...


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Quite simply because what you describe as "stacking the Gmaj7 as 2-3-4-1" is not a viable fingering for that chord at all. Others have described that position as not "comfortable", but I'd go further and say it's not viable at all. You might be able to play it if you slow down and painstakingly place the fingers that way, but it'll be extremely hard, if ...


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In the 2nd bar it doesn't matter as the half note B is hold - like Tim says. But in some other chords with non-chord tones I think the sustain pedal isn't a good solution and I would use it carefully. If you consider the arrangement as a 3 voice piece of the melody and chords in the r.h. and in the left hand you have a bass line and a rhythmic accompaniment ...


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Even if an alternative fingering is possible, I would argue that being able to play a barred chord like this is a skill that is worth learning. I would approach this chord like so: Bar at 5th fret with middle finger on the 6th fret 3rd string and the ring finger on 7th fret 1st string. Pretty straight-forward. Now, how you can prevent accidentally muting ...


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One way to play A9 there is to barre across the four strings, and with careful finger placing it will work. Another is to use four separate fingers - in ascending order - index, ring, middle, pinky. It's not impossible, just a little awkward, like a lot of chords on guitar! The barre version is quite convenient to get to should the previous chord also be ...


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In reality, because the sustain pedal is holding the 1st E, and later in the bar, the B, there's no need to keep a finger on either - the pedal's job takes over. It is often confusing seeing piano music written like this - but consider the stem direction - it's written in parts, as if for two different instruments to play the bass clef notes, and ...


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The definition and history allows two derivation and associations that are covering our sensation when we are using the term pad and are congruent with the answers we have already got: So I try and additional answer: A pad in music can be for instance a string pad or synth pad. and now the association: something soft (soft pad) to lay on! The melody lays ...


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What is a secondary dominant chord? There are two parts to the question: what is a dominant chord? secondary to what? In major/minor tonal system the tonic and dominant chords are the two most important chords which define a key. A tonic chord can be any major or minor triad. The tonic chord is the "home" chord of the key, the principle chord of ...


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What is a secondary dominant chord? Let's say we are in C: V7-I => G7 = dominant7 of C: G7 - C V7/V => D7 secondary dominant of C: D7 - G (spelling D-seven is five seven of five of C) etc. following the circle of 5ths and "running" counter clockwise back to C Example 1 : V7/V (five seven of five) C => B7-E7-A7-D7-G7-C = I-V7/V7 (B7-E7)-V7/V7 (E7-...


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Just re-wording from existing answer and comments... Enharmonically respell Gdim7 to A#dim7 as A# C# E G The D#dim7 is D# F# A C Extend that with the part @piiperi hinted at: some theory treats leading tone diminished seventh chords as incomplete dominant ninth chords. If we put the supposed root of those incomplete dominant ninths in parenthesis we ...


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Why? Because new players are likely to have no strength in their pinky. As a beginner player, I somewhat ran into this today while learning G. My first reaction after struggling to even get it with my ring finger was to use the pinky. Seems much easier overall, but then again I've only had my guitar for 4 days so that's just my initial impression. It's a ...


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That "A# in a C#m chord" would perhaps be better considered an inverted viidim7/V. Then when the A# appears again, it is in a V/V. Both of these uses of secondary dominance in the 2nd ending make for a very dramatic half-cadence in the music. It may even trick the listener into thinking the key has changed. However, going on into the next measure, we are ...


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There is no need of key change here. This is a half cadence. You’ll find this quite often in the first ending of a repeated phrase. The progression I vi V/V can also be analyzed as I (ii V)/ V and we speak of an extension to to the dominant. The 1st bar after the double barline is still in the dominant and the piece continues in E major.


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I think we can safely ignore the 9's in all the chords--I don't believe they affect harmonic function here. G dim 7 is enharmonically equivalent to A♯ dim 7, which is a secondary dominant chord in the context of E minor. Specifically, it's vii°7/V in E minor. The A♯ dim 7 chord leads to a dominant-function D♯ dim 7 9 chord. Then we're ...


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I think you want to look at more than chord names like E, C#m and label your Roman numerals with keys as well as pay attention to phrase endings. It's important that the section you posted has a second ending volta. It looks like you are at the end of a musical period (two-part phrase group) that modulated to the dominant, and after the double bar the B ...


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For those examples - where the chords are diatonic, belonging to one key - you can call them relative major and minor. Usually the usage is one chord referring to the other: "Am is the relative minor of C major" or "C major is the relative major of Am." There is another kind of chord pairing where the roots are a third apart but not in the same key, and ...


1

We really need to stop considering 'a key' as purely diatonic notes and chords. Straying into harmonies that are on each side of the 'keys'' place on the circle of 4/5s is so commonplace it doesn't raise much of an eyebrow. As in 'key E', there will be places where F♯ harmony or D harmony crops up in many pieces. When they do, it's often in an ...


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Just take a look at what he's doing. What he's saying is that you don't want to pluck the string by pulling it up and away from the top of the guitar. The initial action of the finger on the should be such that you feel the strings pushing your hand away slightly, like a spring. You push in a little. The follow through is along an arc that eventually ...


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The action your fingers should take is a curling or an uncurling, not a push in towards the guitar as such. So for that stroke you can use the same action shown in the video - your fingernail or fingertip should be moving parallel to the surface of the guitar, either towards the lower strings or the higher strings. Curl and uncurl your fingers while moving ...


4

There is not one absolute standard. But Kostka/Payne's system in Tonal Harmony will allow you to write a unambiguous symbol for any of the four triad types (major, minor, diminished, augmented) on all twelve possible roots within any major or minor key signature. It will also handle diatonic seventh chords and at least a large variety of non-diatonic seventh ...


2

Excellent question! Unfortunately, there does not appear to be a universal standard within the musical community at large. Even looking around this site will give varying systems of notation. However, allow me to provide an argument for the system I prefer: I tend to favor the system labelled above as "traditional" (defining every symbol relative to the ...


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There isn't a 'general standard'. Hence the confusion. I prefer the system ('traditional' according to Wikipedia) where scale degrees are related to the major scale and minor/major chords are lower/upper-case. Minor or major dominant chords are v or V respectively. (Does a 'natural minor' v deserve the functional label 'dominant' anyway?) But the other ...


1

In a minor key, the subtonic triad is usually represented by VII. In a harmonic minor context, it becomes necessary to use an accidental to modify the root of this chord into the leading tone. Some authors prefer to write this as ♯vii°, with the ♯ "sharpening the subtonic into the leading tone. Personally, I prefer to write this as ♮vii°, using the natural ...


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The notated tones of the penultimate chord are F# A# D# - D# minor - and the final chord is E B E. If the D# chord were diatonic is would simply be a viio6/3, D# diminished in first inversion, spelled F# A D# with an A natural. For the Roman numeral I would think it should be lower case vii for a minor chord, but some systems just use upper case for all ...


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Just guessing doesn't make much sense here. In such a case it's usually wise to actually listen, it's music after all! And listening reveals that the chord is actually an Eb7(#9,b5). You can hear the transition from the #5 in the previous chord to the b5 pretty clearly. So the previous chord actually also has a #5 (or b13): Eb7(#9,#5) Eb7(#9,b5) So what ...


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The link says: *...construed with the chord symbols VII♯6 3-I (if the final is taken as a Lydian-mode tonic) or III6 3-IV (if the final is taken as a scale degree 4 in major). This must be clear. It is not VII# refers to the example in E, 6/3 means 1st inversion. The VII degree of Em is D. VII# = D#. So III63-IV is analog to VII#63 - I ... But if we are ...


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It seems a slightly unusual way to write out chord symbols in my experience. However, guesswork says that Dm7♮ will be 'D minor, major seventh'. Made up from - D F A C♯. Sometimes written as DmM7. The E♭9+11- should be 'E flat sharp nine flat eleven', containing E♭ G, B♭ D♭ F♯, A♭♭. Which doesn't make a ...


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I was going to suggest something slightly opposite of Lee C. I've found chords provide something of a shorthand which enables the dot information to actually be consumed faster, particularly when sight reading. When Dm appears above the staves, one doesn't have to read each individual dot but only recognize the particular pattern in which the D minor dots ...


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Dm7♮ may be D minor/maj7. The second one is Eb#9b11, i.e. Eb G Bb F# Abb Proper voice-leading notation with the 3rd (G) on top would be better though.


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The dim vii is also considered as an incomplete V7 (without root tone), it was used before the the dominant7 chord came up (in 1st inversion like in your example). Doubling the 3rd and also the 5th is practical and I can't see anything wrong in your solution. As there is no tension of the 7th (A-G) there is no need to resolve G to F#.


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The way the E is doubled you do need to move the voices in contrary motion to avoid parallel octaves to D. Considering that it seems OK. Maybe their expectation is to double the tonal degree G so the outer voices are E C# to D D. The doubled G then moves by contrary motion to the inner voices F# A. Like this: When it comes to the question of double ...


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everyone. I am from the country where Sakamoto was born. I suppose that Gm9->Dm9 should be interpreted as IIm->VIm in F Major, not in C Maj! Besides, Gm9->Bm7->E7 should be as IIm(in F Maj)->IIm(in A Minor)->V7(in A Minor) Hope this helps.


-1

I've actually created this exact thing you're looking for https://www.solfej.io/chords


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When playing sheet music as written, you play the notes that are shown. At the start of the passage you showed, the F and A above middle C are written, and the D below middle C is written. Therefore you should be playing those three notes at the start of that measure. How you play the notes is your business. I would play (and hold) the two notes in the ...


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how to interpret musical notation involving chords You'll have to understand that sheet music of Pop songs never can represent the original performance. They can give you the idea of the notation of the tune (the pitch will be correct but the rhythm is hard to notate) and also the notation of the chords is mostly an idea what a piano reduction could look ...


2

Piano players using the music will play in one of two ways. The basic way is to play the notes shown on the treble clef with r.h., and those shown on the bass clef with l.h. Very straightforward. The chord symbols shown are there for guitar as much as any, as a guitarist would probably play chords and read those letter names. A piano player might use the ...


4

Since you're playing piano, you would normally ignore the chord symbols. Your right hand plays the notes in the upper staff, and your left hand plays the notes in the lower staff. The practice of printing chord symbols in sheet music was originally for the benefit of people playing guitar or banjo or ukulele or autoharp or the like: chord instruments that ...


6

Play what is notated. The chord symbols describe the harmonic basis of what you WILL be playing. Sometimes you'll see music that has just a melody line and chord symbols. In that case you'd be expected to make up a LH part similar to what is written. But in this case, if you're playing this keyboard arrangement ON a keyboard, you play what it says. ...


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The notes and chord symbols are two separate complementary things. The Dm chord symbol is a short summary, abstraction, description, simplification of the overall harmony which continues until the next chord symbol, and the notes ("dots") are a concrete realization written out as notes. You could ignore the chord symbols and just play the notes, even ...


0

Richard explained the whole thing pretty well in his answer, but there are a few things I'd like to add. A scale has stable and unstable notes. In a C major scale, the stable notes are C, E and G. The rest of them - D, F, A and B - are unstable. For reasons, it's desirable to choose an axis that makes every note keep it's stability property. And there's ...


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