Skip to main content

New answers tagged

1 vote

Do sus24 chords exist?

In this context, Gsus24 is a reasonable way of labelling that chord. We might question, however, whether chord symbols are helpful here at all. A very specific voicing is required. And if the writer ...
Laurence's user avatar
  • 93.8k
1 vote

Do sus24 chords exist?

A seventh chord in third inversion is a possibility for this. It could be A half diminished seventh. But for that to be convincing, it would probably need to go to D7. That doesn't happen, so some ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Do sus24 chords exist?

Yes, there can be chords that include simultaneous suspensions of both 4 and 2. They're called "double suspensions" and come in a variety of forms: 6-4, 9-4 (i.e., 4-2), 9-7. Looking only at ...
Aaron's user avatar
  • 90.2k
3 votes

how do you read this chord?

Yes, it's a pedal tone. Formally, pedal tones are sustained, but interpretively and functionally they don't need to be. And in a piece like this in which pedal is almost certainly used, there will be ...
Aaron's user avatar
  • 90.2k
0 votes

Does "falling fifth" pattern follow the bass tone or the chord label in case of inversions?

In the particular case of your example, and generally for any harmony example that is given with Roman numeral root analysis, the interval movement is referring to chord root movement. However, if you ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
0 votes

Does "falling fifth" pattern follow the bass tone or the chord label in case of inversions?

You can assume that the author did not make a mistake and infer that the author is considering the N6 as a ♭II. If you consider the bass note then there is no falling fifth and the author's statement ...
phoog's user avatar
  • 23.3k
1 vote

deciding chord symbols for chords

Not all notes are equally important; choosing which stack of notes to be labeled with a chord symbol should reflect this! The measures quoted is from the beginning of Chopin's Nocturne in A Flat Major ...
GratefulDisciple's user avatar
0 votes

Is there chord V4-3 in classical music?

Yes, but for clarity... 4-3 isn't a chord type, but a suspension type. I first thought you were asking about V43/ii, a second inversion dominant seventh chord. While Roman numeral analysis usually ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
0 votes

what scale is used for solo over bIIIMaj7 when approaching II-7?

In a major-seventh chord, the natural 11th (in this case, the note Ab in an EbM7) sounds particularly bad. The #11th is often used instead. This is true in any key. user1079505's answer showing that ...
nuggethead's user avatar
  • 5,620
0 votes

fully-diminished chord for chromatic modulation

@phoog's answer clarifies much of the confusion with regard to the figured bass analysis, but this may be helpful to know going forward... Any fully-diminished seventh chord can be used to modulate to ...
nuggethead's user avatar
  • 5,620
4 votes

deciding chord symbols for chords

I've talked before about "lenses." If you're doing an assignment for a teacher, they might want a certain level of detail (and hopefully will communicate it well!), but if it's for your own ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
1 vote

Is there chord V4-3 in classical music?

Yes. The two measures taken together are the secondary dominant of B flat with a 4-3 suspension. There is no E♭ in m. 94; the high notes are labeled incorrectly; they are Fs.
phoog's user avatar
  • 23.3k
0 votes

what scale is used for solo over bIIIMaj7 when approaching II-7?

Because the note A is diatonic in the key of C major. It is also shared with the following II-7 chord. This is the raised 4th degree which distinguishes lydian from ionian.
user1079505's user avatar
0 votes

deciding chord symbols for chords

In this case I would say beat 4 is Dbm chord because the Db and Ab are held over and the F is replaced by the Fb. As for the final 8th note, that is probably better interpreted as a melodic passing ...
John Belzaguy's user avatar
0 votes

deciding chord symbols for chords

I would ignore the legato in between because they're not actually chords BUT if the intent is that they are part of the chord, which I would say they are because they don't belong to the next chord, ...
yarns's user avatar
  • 372
0 votes

fully-diminished chord for chromatic modulation

It is indeed an error, likely due to copy and paste. It's also the first time I've seen the diminished circle being used to denote an augmented fourth. The diminished chord, by the way, is a triad, ...
phoog's user avatar
  • 23.3k
5 votes

Can secondary dominant have 2 tritones with addition of b9?

It's the tritone F♯ and C♮ that is operational mainly - leading to the G and the B of, in this case, E minor. Adding the other two notes produces a fully diminished chord (all notes are m3 apart), and ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 194k
7 votes

Can secondary dominant have 2 tritones with addition of b9?

Yes, a dominant chord with b9 has two symmetrically displaced tritones. It it creates an ambiguity which can be used creatively, as you can resolve the chord in 4 different ways: to E (or Em, your ...
user1079505's user avatar
1 vote

Help with "Copacabana" chord progression analysis pls!

If you want to "cheat", owing to the popularity of Barry Manilow's 1978 song Copacabana there are plenty of scores such as this MuseScore orchestration, this MuseScore reduction to bare ...
GratefulDisciple's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

why does this descending whole-tone chord progression work?

It’s a sequence descending by whole step, so it’s easy for the ear to follow. There is a consistent repeating pattern in both melody and harmony — that’s why sequences are effective in general — with ...
Aaron's user avatar
  • 90.2k
1 vote

why does V/iii to IV work?

Stepwise motion, aka parsimonious voice leading. In this example, would be better blended if B->A, D#->C and F#->F - try it! :D
Rodrigo B. Furman's user avatar
-1 votes

How do I convert Piano songs for Guitar?

Heyo 🤗 I am a computer scientist and guitar player and was really annoyed by the lack of tools for turning a piano chord progression into tabs quickly. So I decided to create a tool that does exactly ...
Anonym's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
Accepted

why does V/iii to IV work?

The first observation to make is that the chord being called V/iii is a half-step down from I: e.g., if I is C major, then "V/iii" is B major. A second observation, but a subjective one, is ...
Aaron's user avatar
  • 90.2k
1 vote

What is the value in analysing chords as if they were made up of stacked triads?

I wouldn't call it analysis - I see it more as a way of looking at chords which in some situations might be useful or practical. Jazz pianist would quite often think about the chords in terms of left ...
Jarek.D's user avatar
  • 1,638
2 votes

figured bass question

This isn't figured bass; it's Roman numeral analysis. If it were true figured bass, the figure at the beginning of the measure would be ♭. This indicates that the third of the chord is lowered. The ...
phoog's user avatar
  • 23.3k
1 vote

figured bass question

Your question is really a prompt for a complete overview of figured bass and that is beyond the scope of Q&A at this site. Personally, I think this page https://robertkelleyphd.com/home/figured-...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
1 vote

What is the value in analysing chords as if they were made up of stacked triads?

There really is not much value to thinking of chords this way other than anecdotally or as a different way of visualizing them, or if it helps in conceptualizing or executing things from a players ...
John Belzaguy's user avatar
0 votes

What is the value in analysing chords as if they were made up of stacked triads?

...In general plain majors are strong/simple while minors are sad, but add2 chords or 6th chords can be even sadder than triads with a minor 3rd... I think you are mixing up analysis of chord with ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
1 vote

What is the value in analysing chords as if they were made up of stacked triads?

What is the value in analysing chords as if they were made up of stacked triads? This forms the basis of functional harmonic theory, which holds that C/E has the same tonal function as plain old C (i....
phoog's user avatar
  • 23.3k
0 votes

What is the value in analysing chords as if they were made up of stacked triads?

In my opinion, the primary value of trying to find a stack-of-thirds interpretation for a chord is to get a simple chord symbol name for it. It's a very condensed way of writing down harmony. For ...
piiperi Reinstate Monica's user avatar
1 vote

When chord tones of ii are beamed to IV, is it IV ii or IV with an auxiliary sonority?

It depends what level of harmonic analysis you want to do. There is the deepest, structural level of just analyzing a whole piece - I can't see the beginning, but this one probably included - as Bb: I ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
2 votes

When chord tones of ii are beamed to IV, is it IV ii or IV with an auxiliary sonority?

Short version: Just because some notes line up vertically does not mean we need to explain them as a chord. When we analyze, we have to look at the context, and not just examine each "stack" ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
3 votes

figured bass question

What makes you choose Eb and Db and write 8-7 when there are many other notes? why are Eb and Db chosen to represent the chord?(what makes Eb and Db stand out among other melody notes? Is it because ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
1 vote

What is the value in analysing chords as if they were made up of stacked triads?

In functional harmony, I don't think it's particularly useful to analyze Cm7 as a Cm + Eb polychord, or to feel that it implies two different scales. But a C + D polychord could be a different matter....
Laurence's user avatar
  • 93.8k
0 votes

When chord tones of ii are beamed to IV, is it IV ii or IV with an auxiliary sonority?

The harmony in bar 6 is B&flat major, and the majority of the previous bar 5 is F the V of said B♭. So it's a perfect cadence there. But also in question is the start of bar 5, so IVmaj7 >V ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 194k
1 vote

figured bass question

The score shows figured chords, Ebm for the first two quarter notes (I assume the eight notes are triplets), then Ebm7 for the last one. So the "other notes" are just figured chords. Number ...
user1079505's user avatar
1 vote

When chord tones of ii are beamed to IV, is it IV ii or IV with an auxiliary sonority?

7-8 and 5-6, called retardations (upward-resolving suspensions), and are "legit" if less common than the usual 8-7 or 6-5 resolutions. I would interpret this passage as ii[6-5] - V, ...
Aaron's user avatar
  • 90.2k
0 votes

Is a “minor Seventh Chord” basically just a combination of a “minor Triad” and its Relative “Major Triad”?

I think there are two main ways to think of the generation of seventh chords, including minor seventh chords. Stacking thirds, and the basic stacks are diatonic. This would be the vertical or ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
1 vote

Is a “minor Seventh Chord” basically just a combination of a “minor Triad” and its Relative “Major Triad”?

Yes. Take any m7 chord in its most basic version. Remove the bottom note, you have a major chord, remove the top note you have a minor chord. Maj7 chords work similarly but backwards.
SzymonD's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes

Question about the iii chord found in the major key

Your question is worded unclearly, but I think I get the general idea: why does the progression work? Why does the progression feel different if you change the chords? I assume the progression repeats....
Michael Curtis's user avatar
2 votes

How do you read chords with beams?

I'll give an even simpler answer: These are eighth notes: So are these: They're all eighth notes because they have only one (horizontal) beam line. Even though they look different, they would sound ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
3 votes

How did tetrachords become whole and half steps?

I'll try to summarize the main bits of this development. First, let's note that our modern idea there were only three types of tetrachord (diatonic, chromatic, enharmonic) is oversimplified and really ...
Athanasius's user avatar
  • 12.7k
0 votes

How do you read chords with beams?

It took me a while, but I think I understand your confusion. The eighth notes are beamed into groups of four eighth notes per beamed group. If you though beam group is meant to group notes by chord, ...
Michael Curtis's user avatar
0 votes

How do you read chords with beams?

A chord change may come at any time (even mid-beat, though that isn't exactly common). The notes are grouped to the beams based on timing (first and second beat: one beam, third and fourth beat: one ...
Divizna's user avatar
  • 2,574
0 votes

Is a “minor Seventh Chord” basically just a combination of a “minor Triad” and its Relative “Major Triad”?

A minor seventh chord is nothing more than just a minor triad with a minor seventh added to it. So a root note, minor third, perfect fifth, and minor seventh.
Neil Meyer's user avatar
0 votes

Is there a way to describe this type of non-functional music?

I’m not aware of a technical term to describe this type of repetitious non-functional harmonic progression. It cerriainly is not unique. There are actually a lot of other 2 chord songs but most of ...
John Belzaguy's user avatar
0 votes

How do I read inversions fast?

I feel like a comment by Aaron deserves expanding into an answer. picture above is D minor in 1st inversion Is it, though? It's true that if you were to walk up to me and ask "what do you call ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
0 votes

Is a “minor Seventh Chord” basically just a combination of a “minor Triad” and its Relative “Major Triad”?

All minor seventh chords are transpositions of one another, so let's take Am7 for an example. It just looks more intuitive with letters rather than numbers. The Am7 chord consists of A, C, E, G. (Root,...
Divizna's user avatar
  • 2,574
1 vote

Is a “minor Seventh Chord” basically just a combination of a “minor Triad” and its Relative “Major Triad”?

I think a m7 chord is 'basically' an extended minor triad. The fact that the upper structure coincides with the relative major's tonic triad is interesting, but not particularly important.
Laurence's user avatar
  • 93.8k
1 vote

Is a “minor Seventh Chord” basically just a combination of a “minor Triad” and its Relative “Major Triad”?

Let's take actual notes to explain. We'll be in key C, with its relative minor Am. The triad notes of Am are A C and E. The triad notes of C major are C E and G. Playing all four notes will produce ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 194k

Top 50 recent answers are included