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3

Chord symbols are an approximation and simplification of essential harmonic ideas for accompanists, leaving precise details up to players to decide. Whoever wrote the notation, declared that the essential idea is "A7", and playing the notes written on the lower staff is one possible realization of that idea. Chord symbols are a way to describe the ...


1

The picture in the OP has the appearance of coming from an "easy piano" arrangement. In such arrangements, it is not uncommon for the chord notation and staff notation to differ slightly. In the case pictured, the arranger is likely trying to preserve both the voice-leading (as discussed by Michael Curtis) and simplicity of fingering/hand-movement. ...


5

I think your question might be better worded as... why did the composer or arranger of this sheet music use an A7 chord label for chord tones E G #C when the purported chord root A is missing? The simple answer is: in this case the chord is regarded as an incomplete chord. Strictly speaking you would say the first chord is a C# diminished chord in first ...


0

The simple answer is that this isn't actually an A7 chord, it's a first inversion C# diminished chord. When you go back before functional root-based chordal practice, you had basso-continuo-based practices. One of the most common guidelines for harmonizing bass scales was the rule of the octave, which typically prescribed a 6-chord (first inversion triad) ...


10

Arpeggiating isn't an exact science. You could play two notes (or more) during the arpeggio. Chord-wise, the first to be sacrificed is usually the 5 note - in chord C7, for instance, the G would go Think about it - without C, it's not a C chord. Without 3 (E), it's not major, and without 7 it's not a 7th chord. So the same could apply in arpeggios. If ...


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For the basic inversions, work on seeing the thirds and fourths contained. ie-- root is thirds. 1st inversion has third on the bottom, fourth on top. 2nd inversion has fourth on the bottom, third on top. Practice moving the hand between those shapes and simply placing the fingers there. Improve economy of motion to each of those shapes (with very little ...


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These are circle of fifths progressions ending, as in indicated in the OP, with the bII (i.e., tritone substitution for V) moving to I. The sequence is characterized by the bass movement, and in its broadest form goes back at least to the Baroque era. The use of a sequence of dominant seventh chords moving to a tritone substitution cadence is a ...


1

I have an even faster way to do that, which doesn't even require a Circle of Fifths on hand: Find the half-steps! Simply put: Take your chords, set of chords, or scales, and line up all of the notes into one big combined "scale". In this case, enharmonic spelling doesn't matter. Look for any notes that are right next to each other. Each half-step ...


1

The simplest explanation for the use of the diminished row, in terms of both layout and harmonic function, is as the diatonic "ii dim" in minor keys. As such, it is placed in the "subdominant" row, relative to the tonic. You can see and hear this relationship by comparing the major-key progression I-IV-V7-I (C-F-G7-C in C major) with the ...


1

Regarding the question about notation software: This requires a program that allows for multiple voices. Enter the dotted half-note in one voice, then enter the quarter-rest and two staccato chords as a second voice. The software will understand that the two voices are happening simultaneously and format them as desired. For example, here are instructions ...


1

Minor sixth chords are delicious and common in a lot of minor folk musics (and Latin music & swing). Cm6 is C Eb G A. Since the diminished chord buttons drop the 5, you can get that by pressing the minor (C Eb G) and the diminished (A C Eb) button at the same time.


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By asking what key includes a pair of chords, the answers are as previously given. However, there is more flexibility if you ask what scale contains a pair of chords. In that case, 02fentym's answer provides the mechanism. Lay out the notes of your chords in alphabetical order, as indicated. A B C E G# Now you can construct a scale that suits your purposes. ...


1

TL;DR The root of the chord, as given, is B -- thus, a vii chord -- because the resolution of the outer voices dominates the sound. How do we get to a Db (i.e., bII) chord? Voice-leading "rules" In the canonical teaching of functional harmony, there are rules about how certain intervals are required to resolve. In particular: diminished intervals ...


1

This is a genre-specific question, depending a lot on how deep into harmony the music we're talking about is. With pop/rock music, in general, the song is in a key, and the chords and notes are derived from that. As an example, Lynyrd Skynyrd's "Sweet Home Alabama" is arguably in G, and the chords are D, C and G, and the notes you can reach for are ...


1

Now when the song changes chords(from D to F let's say), does the notes adjust themselves(from the D maj scale to the F maj) according to what scale the current chord uses? So after changing chords to F, rather than using the 3rd note in the D scale(which is F) do we use the 3rd note in F(so we play A)? Or do we stick to the D scale and play the F note again?...


0

"Now when the song changes chords(from D to F let's say), does the notes adjust themselves(from the D maj scale to the F maj) according to what scale the current chord uses?” Simple answer: yes. Chords are built according to the scale of the root note, regardless of the key in which the chord is utilized. So an F Major chord is always F, A, C (1, 3, 5 ...


2

I think you shouldn't overstate the ease of guitar chords just because you can slide a non-open chord up and down the neck. That certainly is not the whole picture of playing chords on guitar. Similarly don't discount the shape patterns that do exist on the keyboard. There are certain shapes that repeat like E, A & D major or Eb, Ab & Db major, etc. ...


1

As it stands, the question is a little confused, but here goes. Generally speaking, notes in a bar with one chord will reflect the make up of that chord. If they don't, either they or the chord is in the wrong place. Using diatonic notes and diatonic chords - all of which will be made up from purely the notes belonging to that key, there are so many notes ...


2

In addition to Athanasius' great answer is the fact that virtually every chord change involves at least one note which is static. I encourage students to know what that note is for any two chords, and move fingers to the changed notes. Simple example - triads C and F. Common note C. L.H. - C E G, hold on to C, move to C F A. Practise with C on top instead - ...


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It's true that piano doesn't offer the similarity between chord shapes that guitar does, though that's not true of all chords (i.e., those that have open strings). To play the same progression in multiple keys on guitar will also frequently involve rearranging patterns a bit. Anyhow, advanced pianists often spend a lot of time practicing patterns in ...


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Welcome! Notation such as Bb/F is known as lead sheet symbols or chord symbols. For jazz players and musicians with good theoretical knowledge and understanding of chord construction, this notation serves as shorthand and communicates a lot about the song's progression and the nature of each chord. Rather than reading the printed notes verbatim, a pianist ...


2

C or D I suppose. But, particularly if this is on piano, it might actually be HARDER to play in a different key. The 'all the black notes' keys can fall very nicely under the fingers, just as well as an 'all the white notes' one. Self-taught pianists often 'busk' in G♭ and D♭ majors. Maybe you're more scared of D♭ major than the students would be!


0

If you are expecting to build chords in thirds on each scale degree, it will not work as it does for a major scale, because pentatonic scales use steps larger than whole and half steps. That isn't necessarily a problem. You just need to re-orient (no pun intended) your thinking about harmony away from stuff like I V vi IV. One approach is to use drone notes. ...


1

'To preserve the original feeling' - any key. As, on piano, all notes are part of 12tet, and to most people, a transposed piece will sound the same in any key. Most will not include those with absolute pitch, or those who would be aware that it's been transposed by something like half an octave. My suggestion would be to transpose to key D major. In fact, ...


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What instruments? C major is close and has the simplest key signature. D major is also close, and is easy for beginners on stringed instruments because there'll be plenty of opportunities to play notes on open strings (G, D, A, E).


3

Fingerpicking on a guitar could mean several things. It could be fingering a chord shape and playing strings in a pattern. There are many different finger picking patterns most of which use the notes from chords, but they're not strictly going to be arpeggios. They may or may not constitute arpeggios - but could come close. It could also mean simply using ...


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Arpeggio is the instrument non-specific term. To play the tones of a chord separately instead of simultaneously. Fingerpicking is specific to guitar (and other string instruments I suppose) about how to perform the music. Although fingerpicking doesn't necessarily mean arpeggios. You can play full chords with your fingers. Also, some may consider an arpeggio ...


0

Just to avoid confusion, you have a treble clef with two flats so you are in the KEY of B flat. mkorman's answer is good. Another way to describe it is this: Gm7 chords consists of the notes G, Bb, D and F. The G is usually the bottom note. Bb chords consists of the notes Bb D and F, and usually Bb is the bottom note, but because it says Bb/F (B flat chord ...


2

The notation "Gm7 and Bb/F and Eb sus2" is a compact way of notating chords, also called chord symbols. This is very useful for musicians who know how chords are constructed and played in their instruments. As a guitarist, I find then much more useful than reading 6 notes at a time on a stave. The symbols you mention mean this: Gm7 means a G minor (...


0

Traditional Japanese music has no chords. It is monophonic (or more accurately heterophonic - several instruments may play the same line simultaneously but with different ornamentation). Putting chords to traditional Japanese music would be a modern 'Western' addition. Of course you can do that, but you're not going to find guidance on it from any ...


1

First pay attention to the notes which are common or held between chord... ...ideally you don't want to change fingers on those tones unless a change of position is necessary. So, instead of thinking it's three finger placements in the first chord followed by four finger placements in the second chord, think of the first chord as three fingers placed and ...


0

Usethe Arm Movement for chords. Use one finger as the pivot and release the rest of the finger on the notes. If you insist on the same chords, the muscle memory will guide you to the correct keys. Be patient and keep repeating the same chord before going to the next.


2

There may well be an instruction at the top saying capo the 3rd fret. Then you can play the (simple) open chords to accompany the song. Actually Em7 would be even more simple! The other explanation may be that there is a part for a transposing instrument, which would play to provide a key a m3 away, and the bracketed chord would be in tune with that.


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It's not 100% clear, but I'd say that you either use a capo at 3rd fret, and play an Em chord shape, which results in a Gm, or you play Gm with a barre at the 3rd fret. Indeed it could have been explained better...


2

You would arrange the 4 notes as closely as possible. C, E, G, C. One of these in my picture. Or a further octave transposition to be pedantically complete, but the first one will do for a theory exam question! Despite the 'Piano' tag and the word 'strike' in the question, some people have assumed this MUST be about SATB writing, and have described a ...


0

sus4 chords are even in rock very often resolved to third. An extreme example is Pinball Wizard, the verse of which consists basically only of sus4-major resolutions. Even when they aren't resolved, then they often function as if that would happen, but the third is just not explicitly played. sus2, or rather sus9, chords are a different story: these are best ...


0

I think there is no specific term for a slow arpeggio. The basic arpeggio - as an embellishment - is to hold the notes... ...but there isn't really a standard for how fast to play it. An option is notate the speed you want and use ties... ...from Kornlein, Morgengruss. The separated chord tones in that example anticipate the beat, but you could notate ...


0

An Arpeggio is when the notes of a chord are played (and released) consecutively, (normally low to high): When the played notes in the chord are not released, it called an Arpeggiato: [see Dolmetsch Music Dictionary : Ar - Ar] On a brass or woodwind instrument, you can play an arpeggio but you cannot play an arpeggiato. But on a guitar, glockenspiel, or ...


1

Close position is the correct term. See, for example, here and here. Also, from "The Complete Musician" by Steven Laitz: The third and the fifth of each triad are arranged directly above the root. This tight spacing ... of chordal members is called close position.1 One source of confusion is that "close" and "closed" sound ...


1

I consider jazz symbols as based on a hypothetical dominant 13th chord, in major, with all the extensions and modifications from that point of reference. So, the root is given as the specific pitch F#, then add notation to mod from a dominant seventh chord: drop the seventh, the major third needs to be lowered by two half steps (𝄫3), the perfect fifth ...


0

Playing/hearing the progression is perhaps the best way to understand the "how" of it. In addition to key (C minor, as others have explained), it can be helpful to understand the chords in terms of voice-leading; that is, how one chord voicing proceeds to the next and leads the ear through the progression. For example: Cm9 contains G; Ab9 contains ...


4

Italian Augmented 6th - It6, It+6, or #iv6 - In C Major, spelled Ab7(no 5) German Augmented 6th - Ger6, Ger+6, or Ger65 - In C major, Ab7 French Augmented 6th - Fr6, Fr+6, or Fr43 - In C major, Ab7(#5) and Neapolitan 6th - N6 - In C major, Db/F The last isn't really augmented, but I included to complete the list of unusual chord symbols. What you might be ...


0

Thrown off by the Ab dominant 9th chord, is this chord in the key of C? As long as C stays the home note and C minor stays the home chord, you can consider being in the key of C minor. It really doesn't matter what notes or chords are played, if playing them doesn't disturb your sense of home chord. "This song is in C minor" means three things: (1)...


2

...seems to sound ok ...to resolve if neccessary I think this needs to be explained: a bona fide suspension and its resolution are ideas that come from counterpoint. That's an old practice going back to composers like Bach and Palestrina! The foundation for a suspension is regarding intervals like the second, fourth, or seventh as dissonances (think: sounds ...


0

In fact Ab major lies very much "within" the sound world of C minor and will crop up in many many pieces in C minor. What is unusual is that it is a dominant chord, and so contains a Gb, which is a very "outside" tone in C minor. One illustration of how a plain Ab major would be "within" C minor can be seen towards the end of ...


0

Notes with low integer ratios between them will sound most consonant and pleasing and restful. The notes low in the harmonic series will naturally have this property because they are made by fitting a wave into a particular length of tubing or string an integer number of times. If we look at the key of C we would have the following harmonics C C G C E G B ...


0

I know this would not be the right answer from an expert's eye of view. But this is maybe the right answer for the questioner. Chords can be played in many variations, because if you use only those notes found in your chord, you're technically playing the same chord, even if each note is an octave higher or lower. So you're playing a C if you're using only ...


0

There may well be more emphasis on a note rather than a chord. As mentioned at the end of your question. Modal interchange and parallel keys are both used regularly in pieces, which says one particular note rather than a chord is given more weight. Pieces which use only diatonic notes will more readily be recognisable as being in a key - or two. There's ...


2

If the chords are built strictly on a diatonic scale, then the progression will tend to sound like it's in the key of that scale. How strongly it will tend to sound that way depends on how the chords are used. In your example, if G was a dominant chord, then the progression would more strongly sound as in the key of C. If your G is just a triad, then those 3 ...


2

I would rather analyse the progression in G♯-minor, not B-major. Then it's ⅰ5 - Ⅵ | Ⅶsus9-Ⅶsus4 - ⅴ-Ⅴ/7add4 This is quite similar to ⅰ - Ⅵ | Ⅶ - Ⅴ7 which I'd consider a bit of a film-music-cliché progression. Omitting the minor tonic's third is common for getting a minor key's dramatic properties without bringing in the melancholy ones. The Ⅶ, which ...


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