New answers tagged

1

Added tones can be useful in maintaining harmonic density. After e.g. a string of secondary dominants, a plain triad can sound bare. In a Db9-C substitution for a G7-C cadence (that Db9 sounds very like a dense G7+(b9)(b13) chord) it seems only proper to give the C at least an added 6 and 9! Added notes can arise from voice-leading. Or they can just be '...


2

I don't think there are any rules. Or actually, I hope there are no rules, it's just a matter of taste and getting used to. Maybe someone dislikes maj7 chords, because they heard someone else say it sounded like elevator music, in a way which implied that it's a bad thing... and so, "maj7 = bad" for that person. Music students tend to have a period in which ...


0

Overall, it's a root position 7th chord. Taken alone, the upper part is a simple triad, or possibly a 7th chord with the root missing. But it ISN'T alone! The root's in the bass, and is part of the harmony.


1

With my answer I’ll try to make understandable your question for other users. It is a translation of an abstract/thesis: Opening lecture: The logic of chords Prof. Dr. Ingolf Max (Leipzig) I have adapted the example to your question: A logic can be understood as the specification of a set of constitutive rules for a formal game. That these rules set ...


0

That's a major 7th chord in its first inversion. According Jimmy Bruno's approach to studying "jazz" or extended chords on the guitar, if a chord has 4 notes, know that it has 4 inversions, all being; 1-3-5-7 3-5-7-1 5-7-1-3 7-1-3-5 That's it. Unless if you are looking for a different "logic behind".


2

It's a perfectly good and useful chord, and in C major it is as Albrecht Hügli describes. I think most session musicians would quickly work out what was wanted. Bartok used it a great deal. [Though without the chord symbol obviously.]


1

It might be a misprint for F#sus4. It might be a loose description of F(add♯4) or even F(♭5). If you show us the page in question, it might be clear which is intended. As you've seen from answers and comments so far, it's unclear as a chord symbol and therefore its use is not to be recommended.


0

These are the voicings I understand you are using... ...you can call those open voicing as compared to closed voicing where the closed voicing arranges the notes by thirds (or their permutations, ex. GBDF, BDFG, DFGB, etc...) The second chord (F A) doesn't have three tones to make a complete triad. You can call that an implied or incomplete chord. Some ...


2

Chord inversion generally refers to changing the bass note of a chord to something other than the root note of the chord. Thus, if you played G minor chord with the notes G-Bb-D but put the Bb in the bass (so, Bb-G-D or Bb-D-G), then it would be called "inverted". Power chords, meanwhile, tend to refer to open fifth chords. That is, you only have the root ...


3

Adding ♯ to a chord interval indicates augmentation. Thus, sus♯4 means suspension with an augmented 4th (or tritone) instead of a perfect 4th. The chord in this situation is then F B C because B is an augmented 4th above F.


0

Not a chord I've ever come across. If indeed it is Fsus♯4, then its spelling will have to be F B C. As that stands, the B and C will technically be next to each other - otherwise that B would be named as ♯11. It's not, and the 3rd (A) would be retained. Although it wouldn't be the first time a chord has been incorrectly named..! Which I doubt ...


7

Fsus♯4 should be F B♮ C. Fsus4 would be F B♭ C. In terms of the chord/scale system Fsus♯4 would be matched up with some kind of Lydian scale. If F is the tonic and the B actually resolved, I would expect the B♭ to go down to an A and the B♮ to go up to the C. That upward resolution can be called a retardation instead of a suspension. Anyway, in pop and ...


0

Judging from the roots, this is in B flat major... The intro goes like this: Bb - Gm - Gb He starts singing on the turn around - like this (bass enters on the second time through): Eb - Gb - Gm - Gb - Bb Then the verse is: Eb - Gb - Eb - Gb Then back to the turn around: Eb - Gb - Gm - Gb - Bb - Gm - Gb - Eb Those are the chords as analysized up to ...


1

I always thought of them as synonyms, but googling around found that some people see them as different, with the distinctions changing depending on who you ask. Is there a formal distinction between them? If so, what's the difference? Well, people are applying the term "arpeggio" in different ways and that gives food for different thoughts on the ...


0

The second and third chords of your example would work fine as the start of a I6/4 V I cadence in Eb. But to my ears, the Gb-D progression throws off the feeling that it is just an embellishment of a Bb major chord. The leap onto the D makes it sound like the D wants to resolve onto something else. You always need to be careful about a I IV progression, ...


0

First, from your use of a G-flat, I'm going to assume this is intended to be in E-flat minor (with a V-i6/4-V progression) rather than B-flat major. (Please correct me if I've made an inappropriate assumption.) In your case, I would say that, yes, if one had to label this chord, it could be considered a "pedal" 6/4. But the voice-leading is not correct, ...


1

I suppose that is partly because, aside from other reasons proposed by others, in classical/conventional usage, if one wishes to play a B major arpeggio across multiple octaves they would use the fingering as what is given by your teacher. So it would be not only plausible but also convenient to use the same fingerings to play the chord.


2

There are many plausible ways to see the chords, and all of the interpretations are equally true at the same time. Eb9#11 : can be used like you would use (1) Bbm (or Bbmmaj7) in the key of F major, or (2) tritone substitute dominant A7 going to Dm, or (3) F7 or Cm going to Bb major, ... or maybe (4) like an Eb7 or Eb9 if this was a mixolydian blues/funk/...


4

The song is in F major, so that E♭9♯11 chord is really just an altered ♭VII chord. In music of this style ♭VII is often used as a type of dominant, so measures 5–8 just alternate between tonic and this dominant substitute. As for the Bm7♭5 in m. 9, ultimately it's the start of a larger sequence: notice how m. 9 just moves down a ...


3

Following on Matt's answer. There are several '7th' type chords, which need to be explained. Major 7th - containing major 3rd and major 7th notes. Minor 7th - containing minor 3rd and minor 7th notes. Dominant 7th - containing major 3rd and minor 7th notes. Diminished 7th - containing minor 3rd and diminished 7th notes. Minor major 7th - containing ...


3

Honestly, the best way to write this is with your polychord notation. That's unambiguous and easy to read, plus it shows exactly how the chord resolves. What more could you want from a chord symbol? The only other reasonable solution would be to completely reject chord symbols and write out all the notes on a staff, which I assume you've already ruled out. ...


2

To build a 7th chord, my understanding is that you take the 1st, 3rd, 5th and 7th notes of the major scale. A safer, broader understanding is: to build an xxxxx chord, you take the notes that are w, x, y and z semitones above the root of the chord. Given any name for xxxxx (major, diminished, sesqui-augmented pregnant nineteenth), the values of w,x,y,... ...


7

There are several types of 7th chord. What you've constructed is the Major 7th, using the major 3rd and 7th intervals above the root. When abbreviated to a chord symbol, this is "Maj7" or "M7". There's also the Minor 7th chord, built using the minor 3rd and 7th and abbreviated "Min7" or "m7". The one we abbreviate as just "7" is the Dominant 7th chord, ...


3

"To build a 7th chord, my understanding is that you take the 1st, 3rd, 5th and 7th notes of the major scale." That's true for major seventh chords. However, E♭7 is not a major seventh chord. If the chord symbol is just "7", the chord in question is a dominant seventh. One of the ways to construct this type of chord is to take the notes from the root's ...


1

The notation for jazz chords is a completely arbitrary system. There is no musical justification for the assumption that all chords are constructed from stacks of thirds. There is no musical justification for the arbitrary assumption that the 7th is part of the basic chord but the 9th, 11th, and 13th are somehow different and should be called "tensions." ...


3

There are only 9, 11, and 13 intervals used as tensions. In a G7 cord, 9 is A, 11 is C, and 13 is E. The F in this chord is technically a flat 7. F# is the major 7. If a 14 interval existed, it would be F, which is already covered by the 7. If a 15 interval existed, it'd be G, your root. The distance, diatonically, between a 7 and the root of a scale is a ...


1

I think the best answer to your question is that because ultimately it's the same triad chord E maj (E, G# and B). The same note (G#) he ignored on the 11 fret is still there an octave higher on the 2nd string fret9. But, although he's playing the same chord, it's a different voicing of it. The guy looks like playing 2nd, 3rd and 4th strings on fret 9 which ...


1

An important point to remember when writing out the chord tones is to designate which tones include accidentals. Without the accidentals, we're actually talking about completely different chords and it makes it more difficult to properly analyze. If you refer back to the key signature, it will tell you which notes in the scale are to be flatted or sharped ...


3

Here's a start. First, identify the key: You have already found the key to be Eb major. Then, write the notes in the key/scale: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 Eb F G Ab Bb C D Eb Now, find the primary and secondary triad chords of the scale: I Eb G Bb ii F Ab C iii G Bb D IV Ab C Eb V Bb D F ...


1

As well as the pitches Db G Bb E which you mention, there is also the C in the bass (I see you also notated that as "pedal point"). I agree with Richard that the key is temporarily f minor, and I'd argue that the chord is indeed V7♭9. Arguments in favour of this analysis: the chord precedes i, it has all the pitches of V, and it doesn't have any which ...


4

I would use the partcombine function together with the partcombineChords command this way: { \clef bass \partcombine { \partcombineChords g,4 } { <d c'>2 } \partcombine { \partcombineChords g,4 } { <f b!>2 } } Afterwards you shouldn't forget \partcombineAutomatic if necessary.


1

Harmonic intervals: A chord contains 2 or more intervals. The intervals can be related to the root note of the chord, to the Bass note or to any other tone of the chord. We can say a C maj7 is built by a major third a perfect fifth and a major seventh or we can say it contains 3 thirds (major,minor, major) whereby the highest note is a minor second lower ...


1

An interval is just the difference or distance between two pitches. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interval_(music) Wikipedia differentiates between "harmonic" and "melodic" intervals. If the two notes are played simultaneously, it's a harmonic interval, but if they're played sequentially, it's a melodic interval. A chord on the other hand consists of a ...


1

A great question which needs answers! No, they're not the same. Intervals are not chords, and chords are not intervals. They do, however, have a sort of relationship, but it can get confusing - hence the question! An interval - any interval - is defined as the space between two notes. It also needs the names of those two notes to be classified. To clarify ...


4

Your guess is correct about the meaning of the notation. Usually, for strings this implies that you play the lower note briefly at the beginning and then play the double-stop with the upper two notes and hold that for the rest of the duration. For Lilypond, I can immediately think of two common ways to do something like this. (1) The simplest is to tweak ...


1

They are not the same, but they are deeply linked. Think of a card game like poker. An interval is the value of the card in relation with another card: queen and king have an interval of one, jack and king an interval of two, and so on. A chord is a collection or a group of cards: a hand, the turn flop and river, a deck, a stack, etc. In short, an interval ...


3

Music doesn't have to change chords, but such music is comparatively rare. Why does most music change chords, why does Amazing Grace change chords? Amazing Grace is a hymn, and the phrasing of hymns is rooted in classical harmony where cadences typically mark the end of phrases. By definition a cadence requires a two chord movement. So, to the extent that ...


1

You need to change chord in the same way as you need to change pitches and note lengths! That is, you don't HAVE to, and there might even be a certain minimalistic charm to a piece consisting of a string of identical notes. But it's not the general plan.


0

By now you should be convinced that the #9 in a chord with root E is an F## (or Fx), which is enharmonically equivalent to a G. However, I think the real question is whether that chord should be called E7(#9) - as is very common, at least in the English speaking part of the world -, or if it should be called E7(b10), which is also used, and definitely not ...


2

As the other answers point out, that 'G' is in fact Fx. Given the fact that the chord is called E7♯9, and the 9th note in E is F♯, then that note gets sharpened again. thus F♯♯, or Fx. I think the misnaming comes from the fact that m3 is used a lot in Blues (and jazz), and that actually is called 'G'. Since in 12tet it sounds exactly ...


2

Are you sure you mean F♯ minor, or did you just mean F minor? Although the key signature has one sharp, the music at this point is clearly setting up a big dominant of F. Above the pedal point C, the E♭ G B♭ D♭ that you mention is an E fully diminished seventh chord, which is a viio7 chord in the key of F minor. Some would choose to include the bass ...


3

This has already been answered correctly twice, so I will instead try to add a new perspective. Yes it is technically inaccurate to perceive the #9 as a minor 3rd scale degree, and so F## or Fx is how I teach it to my students. However, the G is practical. Many accomplished Blues and Jazz players will spell it [as a G] to ease real-time improvisation, ...


5

E7#9 should have (E, G#, B, D, F##), in general (1, 3, 5, b7, #9). It has an F##, or Fx. Many music students equate enharmonic tones but the fact is this is not always correct. It works in Equal Tempered Tuning but not all tuning systems. A proper music text should not equate these. The #9 is not the same thing as a b3. My question to you would be ...


10

An E9 would have an F♯ in it. An E7♯9 doesn't have a G in it, it has an F𝄪 (double sharp) rather than a G. While those are enharmonic equivalents, they are very different in connotation. When double sharps are introduced, there are some lines of thought where it's better to write an enharmonic equivalent that may be less accurate that go into ...


3

It's pretty clearly a Gmaj7 chord with fingering (from low E to high e): X X 5 4 3 2 It's the IV chord of the key, coming from a Dmaj7 chord.


1

Difficult to make out exactly with the microphone in the way, but the position of the pinky especially makes it look like a loosely-barred "open-C" pattern starting at the second fret, which would make it a D. But it looks like he is muting with the index finger, and possibly leaving the G string open, more like: The internet says that the song is in D. ...


0

He does look like he is using the 11th fret. In the TAB the lowest line is the low E string. In other words the strings are "upside down" in comparison to how they would be if you are looking at the guitar in someone else's hands. As you look down at your guitar neck while you hold it the strings should appear in the order shown in the TAB. The "first" ...


2

It’s likely you mean the I is minor, thus i-, bVI, bIII, bVII. This is a very popular progression (turnaround) in disguise. It is the same as vi, IV, I, V when you make the bIII the I. For example, the progression for the verses of Bob Marley’s “Is This Love?” is F#-, D, A, E. The key signature has three sharps which could make the song either in F# ...


3

That's the normal way to play a repeated note when the notation doesn't call for sustained notes or legato. Note that on, say, a piano, if you play a chord twice, there will be a silence because when you lift your hand, the dampers will kick in. To prevent that, you can use the sustain pedal. Then that becomes somewhat like the effect of strumming a guitar'...


1

Well, it's possible with a bit of ingenuity, or disingenuity: Add Stave text for the letter (attached to the note) and move it so it's positioned correctly. Add a figured bass (Add ▸ Text ▸ Figured bass, or Ctrl-G) to the note — you can use a carriage-return to put numbers below others, and + and - appear correctly. ...


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